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Maps Blog — Jan 2014

  • January
    23

    Make Clickable Shapes in the Native Bing...

    The native Bing Maps Windows Store control has two types of shapes: polygons and polylines. These shapes are great for representing areas and paths on the map. Often it is useful to be able to associate some information or metadata with these shapes. In past versions of Bing Maps we could easily store this information in the Tag property of the shape. This makes it easy to retrieve this data when a shape is clicked or tapped. Unfortunately,the MapPolygon and MapPolyline shapes in the native Bing Maps Windows Store control do not have a Tag property. Recently on the Bing Maps forums, one of our Bing Maps engineers pointed out that the MapPolygon and MapPolyline classes are both DependancyObjects . This means that we could create a DependencyProperty which adds a “Tag” property to these shapes. In this blog post we are going to see just how easy this is to do. To get started, open up Visual Studio and create a new project in either C# or Visual Basic. Select the Blank App template, call the application ClickableShapes, and press OK . Add a reference to the Bing Maps SDK. To do this, right click on the References folder and press Add Reference . Select Windows → Extensions , and then select... Read More The native Bing Maps Windows Store control has two types of shapes: polygons and polylines. These shapes are great for representing areas and paths on the map. Often it is useful to be able to associate some information or metadata with these shapes. In past versions of Bing Maps we could easily store this information in the Tag property of the shape. This makes it easy to retrieve this data when a shape is clicked or tapped. Unfortunately,the MapPolygon and MapPolyline shapes in the native Bing Maps Windows Store control do not have a Tag property. Recently on the Bing Maps forums, one of our Bing Maps engineers pointed out that the MapPolygon and MapPolyline classes are both DependancyObjects . This means that we could create a DependencyProperty which adds a “Tag” property to these shapes. In this blog post we are going to see just how easy this is to do. To get started, open up Visual Studio and create a new project in either C# or Visual Basic. Select the Blank App template, call the application ClickableShapes, and press OK . Add a reference to the Bing Maps SDK. To do this, right click on the References folder and press Add Reference . Select Windows → Extensions , and then select... Read More
  • January
    15

    Map-Driven Search in Windows Store Apps

    The Bing Search API gives developers the ability to incorporate search results powered by Bing into applications and websites. In addition to web search results, we can also retrieve images, videos and news results, and embed them in apps based on query terms, location information and other filter criteria. Traditional search experiences involve capturing user search intent via typed text input, but in this post, we will build an app in which the user can retrieve search results based on their navigation and interaction with a dynamic Bing Map. We will build a Windows Store App (C# and XAML) using Bing Maps for Windows Store Apps and the Bing Search API . App Concept The purpose of our application is to enable our users to explore location-centric search content through an intuitive map-based UI. To do this, we leverage the rich event model exposed by the Bing Maps for Windows Store Apps control to signal location-based search intent as the user interacts with the dynamic map. The specific events that we will use to trigger a search will be: Double-tap - When the user double-taps the map at any time, we will override the default zooming behavior, and instead will retrieve contextual... Read More The Bing Search API gives developers the ability to incorporate search results powered by Bing into applications and websites. In addition to web search results, we can also retrieve images, videos and news results, and embed them in apps based on query terms, location information and other filter criteria. Traditional search experiences involve capturing user search intent via typed text input, but in this post, we will build an app in which the user can retrieve search results based on their navigation and interaction with a dynamic Bing Map. We will build a Windows Store App (C# and XAML) using Bing Maps for Windows Store Apps and the Bing Search API . App Concept The purpose of our application is to enable our users to explore location-centric search content through an intuitive map-based UI. To do this, we leverage the rich event model exposed by the Bing Maps for Windows Store Apps control to signal location-based search intent as the user interacts with the dynamic map. The specific events that we will use to trigger a search will be: Double-tap - When the user double-taps the map at any time, we will override the default zooming behavior, and instead will retrieve contextual... Read More
  • January
    08

    Capture Addresses from Artifacts Using...

    One of the most intriguing capabilities that Bing offers for empowering always-connected devices is the ability to visually recognize and understand artifacts in the real world. This is made available to developers via the Bing Optical Character Recognition (OCR) control for Windows 8.1 store apps. This control enables text from the outside world to be read by taking a picture from an on-device camera and analyzing the picture via a web service, with text and position information returned for interpretation. In this post, we will leverage the Bing OCR control to capture addresses from real-world artifacts, and will geocode the addresses with Bing Maps REST Locations API to enable us to obtain accurate coordinates and other metadata, as well as visualize the locations using Bing Maps for Windows Store Apps . The prerequisites for building and successfully testing our application include: Windows 8.1 and Visual Studio 2013 A Windows 8.x certified device with a built in rear facing camera that supports 1280x720 or 640x480 resolution in photo mode The Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps The Bing OCR Control A subscription to the Bing OCR Control in the Windows Azure Marketplace Registration... Read More One of the most intriguing capabilities that Bing offers for empowering always-connected devices is the ability to visually recognize and understand artifacts in the real world. This is made available to developers via the Bing Optical Character Recognition (OCR) control for Windows 8.1 store apps. This control enables text from the outside world to be read by taking a picture from an on-device camera and analyzing the picture via a web service, with text and position information returned for interpretation. In this post, we will leverage the Bing OCR control to capture addresses from real-world artifacts, and will geocode the addresses with Bing Maps REST Locations API to enable us to obtain accurate coordinates and other metadata, as well as visualize the locations using Bing Maps for Windows Store Apps . The prerequisites for building and successfully testing our application include: Windows 8.1 and Visual Studio 2013 A Windows 8.x certified device with a built in rear facing camera that supports 1280x720 or 640x480 resolution in photo mode The Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps The Bing OCR Control A subscription to the Bing OCR Control in the Windows Azure Marketplace Registration... Read More