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Maps Blog

  • December
    09

    How to Create a Speech-Powered Geocoding...

    In a previous post , we saw how to incorporate speech into a JavaScript-based Windows Store app. In this post, we will speech-enable a XAML-based Windows Store app to provide a speech-driven geocoding and routing experience. Two very common activities in map-based applications include searching for locations, and obtaining driving directions. In many scenarios, it can be more convenient and faster for users to provide the input for these activities via speech rather than keyboard, especially when using devices in which a full keyboard is not present. In this post, we will enable speech-based geocoding and routing using Bing Maps for Windows Store Apps , the Bing Speech Recognition Control for Windows 8.1 , and the speech synthesis capabilities of the Windows 8.1 SDK. The prerequisites for building our application include: Windows 8.1 Visual Studio 2013 The Windows 8.1 SDK The Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps The Bing Speech Recognition Control for Windows 8.1 A subscription to the Bing Speech Recognition Control in the Windows Azure Marketplace Registration of your application in the Windows Azure Marketplace We can refer to the Bing Speech Recognition Control documentation for... Read More In a previous post , we saw how to incorporate speech into a JavaScript-based Windows Store app. In this post, we will speech-enable a XAML-based Windows Store app to provide a speech-driven geocoding and routing experience. Two very common activities in map-based applications include searching for locations, and obtaining driving directions. In many scenarios, it can be more convenient and faster for users to provide the input for these activities via speech rather than keyboard, especially when using devices in which a full keyboard is not present. In this post, we will enable speech-based geocoding and routing using Bing Maps for Windows Store Apps , the Bing Speech Recognition Control for Windows 8.1 , and the speech synthesis capabilities of the Windows 8.1 SDK. The prerequisites for building our application include: Windows 8.1 Visual Studio 2013 The Windows 8.1 SDK The Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps The Bing Speech Recognition Control for Windows 8.1 A subscription to the Bing Speech Recognition Control in the Windows Azure Marketplace Registration of your application in the Windows Azure Marketplace We can refer to the Bing Speech Recognition Control documentation for... Read More
  • December
    05

    Introducing the Bing Maps Preview App for...

    Today we announced the release of the Bing Maps Preview app built for Windows 8.1. As a first look at the next generation of the Bing Maps app, it offers a beautiful 3D experience designed for touch that brings the best of Bing and Windows together. Get all the details in the official announcement on the Bing Blog and let us know what you think. Today we announced the release of the Bing Maps Preview app built for Windows 8.1. As a first look at the next generation of the Bing Maps app, it offers a beautiful 3D experience designed for touch that brings the best of Bing and Windows together. Get all the details in the official announcement on the Bing Blog and let us know what you think.
  • November
    20

    How to Extend Your App with Talking Maps

    In a previous blog post we had a lap around the new support for Custom Geospatial Data in the Bing Spatial Data Services (SDS). This time around we will build upon that tutorial and extend the app so that we can talk to it and have it talk back. Check out the video to see and hear what we’re going to build. In order to achieve this, we leverage the Bing Speech Recognition Control for Windows 8.1 as well as the Windows 8.1 SDK for speech synthesis. The documentation for the Bing Speech Recognition Control contains detailed instructions on how to register and install the control and how to enable a project for speech recognition so we won’t dive too deep into this. Instead we start with our previous project assuming that You signed up for the Bing Speech Recognition Control in the Windows Azure Marketplace You registered an application and created a Client ID and Client Secret in the Azure Marketplace You downloaded and installed the Bing Speech Recognition Control You downloaded and installed the Windows SDK for Windows 8.1 Speech-Enabling Our Project Once we are all set up, we open the project that we created for the previous blog post... Read More In a previous blog post we had a lap around the new support for Custom Geospatial Data in the Bing Spatial Data Services (SDS). This time around we will build upon that tutorial and extend the app so that we can talk to it and have it talk back. Check out the video to see and hear what we’re going to build. In order to achieve this, we leverage the Bing Speech Recognition Control for Windows 8.1 as well as the Windows 8.1 SDK for speech synthesis. The documentation for the Bing Speech Recognition Control contains detailed instructions on how to register and install the control and how to enable a project for speech recognition so we won’t dive too deep into this. Instead we start with our previous project assuming that You signed up for the Bing Speech Recognition Control in the Windows Azure Marketplace You registered an application and created a Client ID and Client Secret in the Azure Marketplace You downloaded and installed the Bing Speech Recognition Control You downloaded and installed the Windows SDK for Windows 8.1 Speech-Enabling Our Project Once we are all set up, we open the project that we created for the previous blog post... Read More
  • November
    13

    Introducing Support for Custom Geospatial...

    The Bing Spatial Data Services (SDS) have always supported the management and retrieval of your points of interest (POI). You can upload text or XML-files with addresses or GPS-locations and batch-geocode or reverse geocode them, you can store them in the cloud and query your points of interest in a radius around a location, in a bounding box, or along a route. The SDS also provides access to categorized POI in North America and Europe as well as traffic incidents . Back in June, we added a preview of a GeoData API , which allows the retrieval of boundaries for countries, administrative regions, postcodes, cities and neighborhoods. With the latest release, we have now added additional features that allow you to upload your own geospatial data of type POINT, MULTIPOINT, LINESTRING, MULTILINESTRING, POLYGON, MULTIPOLYGON and GEOMETRYCOLLECTION. We have also extended the Query API and added an additional spatial-filter parameter to retrieve geographies that intersect with another geography or just those parts that represent the intersections. These new features enable you to store and retrieve parcels, flood-plains, trails, power-lines, school-districts, sales-regions or other geospatial... Read More The Bing Spatial Data Services (SDS) have always supported the management and retrieval of your points of interest (POI). You can upload text or XML-files with addresses or GPS-locations and batch-geocode or reverse geocode them, you can store them in the cloud and query your points of interest in a radius around a location, in a bounding box, or along a route. The SDS also provides access to categorized POI in North America and Europe as well as traffic incidents . Back in June, we added a preview of a GeoData API , which allows the retrieval of boundaries for countries, administrative regions, postcodes, cities and neighborhoods. With the latest release, we have now added additional features that allow you to upload your own geospatial data of type POINT, MULTIPOINT, LINESTRING, MULTILINESTRING, POLYGON, MULTIPOLYGON and GEOMETRYCOLLECTION. We have also extended the Query API and added an additional spatial-filter parameter to retrieve geographies that intersect with another geography or just those parts that represent the intersections. These new features enable you to store and retrieve parcels, flood-plains, trails, power-lines, school-districts, sales-regions or other geospatial... Read More
  • November
    11

    Complex Polygons in Bing Maps

    In Bing Maps we can easily create simple polygons. Simple polygons consist of a single exterior ring of coordinates. However, in more advance applications it is useful to be able to draw more complex polygons. Take for instance the borders of Lesotho, which is a land locked country within the main exterior borders of South Africa. In this case to properly represent this country’s borders we would need to have a hole in the polygon. In this blog post we are going to see how you can create complex polygons such as MultiPolygons and polygons with holes using both JavaScript and .NET code in Windows Store Apps. Complex Polygons in the JavaScript API The Bing Maps JavaScript controls, both for the web and for Windows Store apps support complex polygons. To enable this support you first need to load the AdvancedShapes module into your application. This module updates the definition of the Polygon and EntityCollection classes. The new Polygon class is initialized with an array of rings, where each ring is an array of locations. The changes to the EntityCollection are simply to allow it to support the updated complex polygon class. To implement complex polygons, first create... Read More In Bing Maps we can easily create simple polygons. Simple polygons consist of a single exterior ring of coordinates. However, in more advance applications it is useful to be able to draw more complex polygons. Take for instance the borders of Lesotho, which is a land locked country within the main exterior borders of South Africa. In this case to properly represent this country’s borders we would need to have a hole in the polygon. In this blog post we are going to see how you can create complex polygons such as MultiPolygons and polygons with holes using both JavaScript and .NET code in Windows Store Apps. Complex Polygons in the JavaScript API The Bing Maps JavaScript controls, both for the web and for Windows Store apps support complex polygons. To enable this support you first need to load the AdvancedShapes module into your application. This module updates the definition of the Polygon and EntityCollection classes. The new Polygon class is initialized with an array of rings, where each ring is an array of locations. The changes to the EntityCollection are simply to allow it to support the updated complex polygon class. To implement complex polygons, first create... Read More
  • October
    15

    Clustering Pushpins in Windows Store Apps

    Clustering of pushpins in Bing Maps consists of grouping together nearby locations into clusters. As the user zooms in, the clusters break apart to reveal the individual locations. The goal of this process is to reduce the number of pushpins that are displayed on the map at any given time. This results in better performance of the map control and also a better experience for the user, as they will be able to see the map and not have pins hiding behind other pins. I wrote my first clustering algorithm in the fall of 2007 for version 5 of the Bing Maps AJAX control. This was later turned into an MSDN article which is still available. Over the years this algorithm has evolved. It was added to v6.3 , and later turned into a module for v7 . The original algorithm used a grid-based system that updated every time you moved the map. This was fast, but also had a small side effect in that even the slightest pan of the map caused the data to re-cluster. Since the grid was based on the current map view, it would sometimes cause data points to move from one grid cell to another, which resulted in pins jumping around. A couple years ago I created a new point-based clustering algorithm . This... Read More Clustering of pushpins in Bing Maps consists of grouping together nearby locations into clusters. As the user zooms in, the clusters break apart to reveal the individual locations. The goal of this process is to reduce the number of pushpins that are displayed on the map at any given time. This results in better performance of the map control and also a better experience for the user, as they will be able to see the map and not have pins hiding behind other pins. I wrote my first clustering algorithm in the fall of 2007 for version 5 of the Bing Maps AJAX control. This was later turned into an MSDN article which is still available. Over the years this algorithm has evolved. It was added to v6.3 , and later turned into a module for v7 . The original algorithm used a grid-based system that updated every time you moved the map. This was fast, but also had a small side effect in that even the slightest pan of the map caused the data to re-cluster. Since the grid was based on the current map view, it would sometimes cause data points to move from one grid cell to another, which resulted in pins jumping around. A couple years ago I created a new point-based clustering algorithm . This... Read More
  • October
    03

    Updated Bing Maps SDKs for Windows Store...

    Today we are announcing the availability of updated Bing Maps SDKs for Windows Store apps for both Microsoft Windows 8.0 and 8.1 in the Visual Studio Gallery. The Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps update for Microsoft Windows 8.1 , which consists of the Bing Maps SDK for JavaScript (for JavaScript Developers) and Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store apps (for Visual Basic, C# and C++ Developers), has been updated for the Microsoft Windows 8.1 release. The SDKs also contain bug fixes and the new Bing logo that was announced on September 16, 2013. Note that the Windows 8.1 release of the Bing Maps SDK is only compatible with Microsoft Windows 8.1 RTM or later, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 RC or later. Windows 8.1 RTM and Visual Studio 2013 RC are only available to MSDN Subscribers until Windows 8.1 GA later in October. In order to submit apps developed using this release to the Windows 8.1 Store, the apps will need to be rebuilt using Microsoft Windows 8.1 GA and Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 RTM or later, when released. Developers using the Preview release of Microsoft Windows 8.1 should continue to use the Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store apps (Beta for Windows 8.1 Preview... Read More Today we are announcing the availability of updated Bing Maps SDKs for Windows Store apps for both Microsoft Windows 8.0 and 8.1 in the Visual Studio Gallery. The Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps update for Microsoft Windows 8.1 , which consists of the Bing Maps SDK for JavaScript (for JavaScript Developers) and Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store apps (for Visual Basic, C# and C++ Developers), has been updated for the Microsoft Windows 8.1 release. The SDKs also contain bug fixes and the new Bing logo that was announced on September 16, 2013. Note that the Windows 8.1 release of the Bing Maps SDK is only compatible with Microsoft Windows 8.1 RTM or later, and Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 RC or later. Windows 8.1 RTM and Visual Studio 2013 RC are only available to MSDN Subscribers until Windows 8.1 GA later in October. In order to submit apps developed using this release to the Windows 8.1 Store, the apps will need to be rebuilt using Microsoft Windows 8.1 GA and Microsoft Visual Studio 2013 RTM or later, when released. Developers using the Preview release of Microsoft Windows 8.1 should continue to use the Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store apps (Beta for Windows 8.1 Preview... Read More
  • October
    03

    Draggable Pushpins in Bing Maps (.NET)

    When building a Bing Maps application, you may want to give the user the ability to drag a pushpin. In the JavaScript version of Bing Maps this can be done by setting the draggable property of a pushpin to true, but the Pushpin class in the .NET version does not have this property, so what can you do? In this blog post, I’ll show you how to create a reusable user control that gives you draggable pushpins, plus a lot more flexibility in terms of customization. Some common uses for draggable pushpins include: Allowing the user to edit locations on the map by moving pushpins. Using draggable pushpins as handles for data points in drawing tools. Creating the user control To get started, open Visual Studio and create a new project in C# or Visual Basic. Select the Blank App (XAML) template, name the application and then press OK. Next, add a reference to the Bing Maps SDK. Right click on the References folder and press Add Reference . Select Windows → Extensions , and then select Bing Maps for C#, C++ and Visual Basic . If you do not see this option, be sure to verify that you have installed the Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store apps. While you are here, also add a reference to the Microsoft... Read More When building a Bing Maps application, you may want to give the user the ability to drag a pushpin. In the JavaScript version of Bing Maps this can be done by setting the draggable property of a pushpin to true, but the Pushpin class in the .NET version does not have this property, so what can you do? In this blog post, I’ll show you how to create a reusable user control that gives you draggable pushpins, plus a lot more flexibility in terms of customization. Some common uses for draggable pushpins include: Allowing the user to edit locations on the map by moving pushpins. Using draggable pushpins as handles for data points in drawing tools. Creating the user control To get started, open Visual Studio and create a new project in C# or Visual Basic. Select the Blank App (XAML) template, name the application and then press OK. Next, add a reference to the Bing Maps SDK. Right click on the References folder and press Add Reference . Select Windows → Extensions , and then select Bing Maps for C#, C++ and Visual Basic . If you do not see this option, be sure to verify that you have installed the Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store apps. While you are here, also add a reference to the Microsoft... Read More
  • September
    06

    Bing Maps Publishes 13 Million Square Kilometers...

    This month, we are excited to announce 13 million sq km, or 315.92 terabytes, of new aerial imagery from around the world. Click on the links below to explore the new and exciting imagery from Bing Maps . Satellite High-resolution nadir or "straight down" orthophotographs taken by aircraft or satellite We routinely refresh our imagery and are happy to announce this latest update. The map below shows the coverage and location of the aerial imagery recently published: Ísafjarðarbær, Iceland Bing Maps Link Maritimes Alps, France Bing Maps Link Rio De Janeiro, Brazil Bing Maps Link Hugh Town, Scilly Isles, England Bing Maps Link Additional Highlights View additional imagery from around the world below: Quebrada Cahiza, Chile Yukon Delta Refuge, Alaska Coastline, Fiji West West of Suzhou, China Harbour Island, Cape Town - Bing Maps Team This month, we are excited to announce 13 million sq km, or 315.92 terabytes, of new aerial imagery from around the world. Click on the links below to explore the new and exciting imagery from Bing Maps . Satellite High-resolution nadir or "straight down" orthophotographs taken by aircraft or satellite We routinely refresh our imagery and are happy to announce this latest update. The map below shows the coverage and location of the aerial imagery recently published: Ísafjarðarbær, Iceland Bing Maps Link Maritimes Alps, France Bing Maps Link Rio De Janeiro, Brazil Bing Maps Link Hugh Town, Scilly Isles, England Bing Maps Link Additional Highlights View additional imagery from around the world below: Quebrada Cahiza, Chile Yukon Delta Refuge, Alaska Coastline, Fiji West West of Suzhou, China Harbour Island, Cape Town - Bing Maps Team
  • August
    22

    Localizing Custom Mapping Data With Bing...

    The Bing Maps for Enterprise platform offers extensive localization capabilities for map navigation, map labels, directions, and geocoding results in the AJAX v7 map control , Windows Store map control , and REST Services . Typically, you will also have your own custom data that you will be displaying within your mapping application. In this post, we will show how you can use another of the Bing Developer Services – the Bing Translator Control and Microsoft Translator API – to localize your own custom content within your Bing Maps applications. We will use the Microsoft Translator API to demonstrate how we can localize custom content in a web application using our AJAX v7 map control, and we will also use the Bing Translator Control to show how we can localize custom content in native Windows Store apps. Prerequisites for building our applications include: Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 The Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps Signing Up for Microsoft Translator on Windows Azure Marketplace As outlined in the Bing Developer Center , the Translator Service offers easy access to robust, cloud-based, automatic translation between more than 40 languages. But before we can get started... Read More The Bing Maps for Enterprise platform offers extensive localization capabilities for map navigation, map labels, directions, and geocoding results in the AJAX v7 map control , Windows Store map control , and REST Services . Typically, you will also have your own custom data that you will be displaying within your mapping application. In this post, we will show how you can use another of the Bing Developer Services – the Bing Translator Control and Microsoft Translator API – to localize your own custom content within your Bing Maps applications. We will use the Microsoft Translator API to demonstrate how we can localize custom content in a web application using our AJAX v7 map control, and we will also use the Bing Translator Control to show how we can localize custom content in native Windows Store apps. Prerequisites for building our applications include: Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012 The Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store Apps Signing Up for Microsoft Translator on Windows Azure Marketplace As outlined in the Bing Developer Center , the Translator Service offers easy access to robust, cloud-based, automatic translation between more than 40 languages. But before we can get started... Read More
  • August
    21

    How the New Japan Geocoder Can Help You

    We are pleased to announce a new Japan geocoder that improves how you search for a Japanese address on http://www.bing.com/maps and how you geocode a Japanese address using the Bing Maps APIs. In this post, we will introduce you to the new features of this geocoder and show you how to use these new features with the Bing Maps REST Services API . We’ve received more than a few inquiries about Japanese address geocoding, so we decided to write a detailed post. You can also find details about Japanese geocoding using the Bing Maps APIs on MSDN . Let’s start with some background. The Bing Maps geocoder is a global geocoding service, but there are many system components that are responsible for geocoding individual markets. One such component is the Japan geocoder, which resolves Japan in-market queries. The Japan geocoder is rooftop based, and relies on Zenrin data provider address points. Zenrin has phenomenal coverage over Japan (99.6%), with the exception of a few offshore islands. Statistically, there’s about a total of 36.1 million rooftop address points that are geocodable. Also, we use more than 250,000 geocodable places of interests. Japanese address... Read More We are pleased to announce a new Japan geocoder that improves how you search for a Japanese address on http://www.bing.com/maps and how you geocode a Japanese address using the Bing Maps APIs. In this post, we will introduce you to the new features of this geocoder and show you how to use these new features with the Bing Maps REST Services API . We’ve received more than a few inquiries about Japanese address geocoding, so we decided to write a detailed post. You can also find details about Japanese geocoding using the Bing Maps APIs on MSDN . Let’s start with some background. The Bing Maps geocoder is a global geocoding service, but there are many system components that are responsible for geocoding individual markets. One such component is the Japan geocoder, which resolves Japan in-market queries. The Japan geocoder is rooftop based, and relies on Zenrin data provider address points. Zenrin has phenomenal coverage over Japan (99.6%), with the exception of a few offshore islands. Statistically, there’s about a total of 36.1 million rooftop address points that are geocodable. Also, we use more than 250,000 geocodable places of interests. Japanese address... Read More
  • August
    05

    Advance Spatial Queries using Entity Framework...

    Recently we published a blog post titled “ How to Create a Spatial Web Service That Connects a Database to Bing Maps Using EF5 .” This post showed how to create a web service that connected Bing Maps to a database using the spatial functionality in Entity Framework 5 (EF5). In that example we only implemented a basic nearby search query. In this post, we are going to expand upon that application and add in more advance spatial search queries such as find in polygon, find in bounding box and find along a route. You can download the full source code and sample database here . Some of these spatial queries are going to require more advanced spatial functionalities than what is available through EF5. The Entity Framework exposes only a subset of the spatial functionalities available in SQL Server. Fortunately all the spatial functionality in SQL Server is available as a .NET library that we can use in our application. If you don’t already have SQL 2008 or above installed locally, get an express version of SQL 2012 . Once installed you should be able to add a reference to the Microsoft.SqlServer.Types.dll which is located in the Assemblies -> Extensions . Add Queries To The Service The... Read More Recently we published a blog post titled “ How to Create a Spatial Web Service That Connects a Database to Bing Maps Using EF5 .” This post showed how to create a web service that connected Bing Maps to a database using the spatial functionality in Entity Framework 5 (EF5). In that example we only implemented a basic nearby search query. In this post, we are going to expand upon that application and add in more advance spatial search queries such as find in polygon, find in bounding box and find along a route. You can download the full source code and sample database here . Some of these spatial queries are going to require more advanced spatial functionalities than what is available through EF5. The Entity Framework exposes only a subset of the spatial functionalities available in SQL Server. Fortunately all the spatial functionality in SQL Server is available as a .NET library that we can use in our application. If you don’t already have SQL 2008 or above installed locally, get an express version of SQL 2012 . Once installed you should be able to add a reference to the Microsoft.SqlServer.Types.dll which is located in the Assemblies -> Extensions . Add Queries To The Service The... Read More
  • July
    31

    How to Create a Spatial Web Service That...

    Entity Framework is a quick and easy way to connect a database to your application. It provides a set of tools that allow you to auto generate your classes for your database tables. Also, it provides you with easy-to-use functionality for connecting and querying your data using LINQ. When Entity Framework was originally released, it simplified my life when it came to connecting a database to Bing Maps via a web service. Unfortunately, it didn’t support the spatial functionalities in SQL 2008, so my new found love for Entity Framework quickly came to an end. In May of 2012 a pre-release version of Entity Framework 5 (EF5) was made available which added support for spatial types when using it in .NET 4.5. I quickly tested it out and wrote a blog post titled Entity Framework 5 & Bing Maps WPF . Since writing that blog post, EF5 has been officially released. I haven’t had much time to play with it, but have since noticed that I get regular questions from people on how to connect a database to Bing Maps. So with that in mind, this blog post will show how to create a spatial web service that connects a database to Bing Maps using Entity Framework 5 . Creating a Spatial Database The first... Read More Entity Framework is a quick and easy way to connect a database to your application. It provides a set of tools that allow you to auto generate your classes for your database tables. Also, it provides you with easy-to-use functionality for connecting and querying your data using LINQ. When Entity Framework was originally released, it simplified my life when it came to connecting a database to Bing Maps via a web service. Unfortunately, it didn’t support the spatial functionalities in SQL 2008, so my new found love for Entity Framework quickly came to an end. In May of 2012 a pre-release version of Entity Framework 5 (EF5) was made available which added support for spatial types when using it in .NET 4.5. I quickly tested it out and wrote a blog post titled Entity Framework 5 & Bing Maps WPF . Since writing that blog post, EF5 has been officially released. I haven’t had much time to play with it, but have since noticed that I get regular questions from people on how to connect a database to Bing Maps. So with that in mind, this blog post will show how to create a spatial web service that connects a database to Bing Maps using Entity Framework 5 . Creating a Spatial Database The first... Read More
  • July
    29

    Heat Maps in Windows Store Apps (JavaScript...

    Heat maps are an effective means of visualizing geography-based trends by showing the relative density of location-based data. We can see where we have ‘hot spots’ in our data, and use this insight to drive better decisions for application users. In this blog post, we will show how you can visualize location data in the form of a heat map within Windows Store apps, pulling in both public points-of-interest data sources available within Bing Maps, as well as custom data sources containing your own data. We will use the Bing Maps Windows Store JavaScript API and a Heat Map Module to create our visualization, and we will pull in our data via the Bing Maps Spatial Data Query API . The full source code for the application is available in the Visual Studio Samples Gallery . To run this application, you must install the Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store apps and get a Bing Maps key for Windows Store apps. You must also have Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012. Instantiating Our Map We will create a JavaScript file for our project in which all of our custom JavaScript code for the app will reside. Within this file, we will include initialization logic to populate a dropdown with available data sources... Read More Heat maps are an effective means of visualizing geography-based trends by showing the relative density of location-based data. We can see where we have ‘hot spots’ in our data, and use this insight to drive better decisions for application users. In this blog post, we will show how you can visualize location data in the form of a heat map within Windows Store apps, pulling in both public points-of-interest data sources available within Bing Maps, as well as custom data sources containing your own data. We will use the Bing Maps Windows Store JavaScript API and a Heat Map Module to create our visualization, and we will pull in our data via the Bing Maps Spatial Data Query API . The full source code for the application is available in the Visual Studio Samples Gallery . To run this application, you must install the Bing Maps SDK for Windows Store apps and get a Bing Maps key for Windows Store apps. You must also have Windows 8 and Visual Studio 2012. Instantiating Our Map We will create a JavaScript file for our project in which all of our custom JavaScript code for the app will reside. Within this file, we will include initialization logic to populate a dropdown with available data sources... Read More
  • July
    19

    Address and Location Capture in Dynamics...

    With the Polaris release of Dynamics CRM Online, Bing Maps has been integrated directly into the Process forms for Accounts, Contacts and Leads. The integration is quite basic, however; the existing address details associated with the entity are geocoded when the form is displayed, and the results are used to show a map of the location. No additional data can be overlaid in the map, feedback on the quality of the geocode match are not provided, nor are the geocoded coordinates able to be refined and saved. In this post, I will demonstrate how we can extend beyond the basic ‘out of the box’ solution using Bing Maps, and also extend it to on-premises CRM deployments as well as online. We will add additional geo-location values to CRM, using the Bing Maps for Enterprise developer APIs to enhance our ability to capture address data quickly and accurately, visualize it on maps, manually adjust latitudes and longitudes with Bing Maps imagery, and use reverse geocoding to find approximate nearby addresses to a given point. This post will provide an additional Bing Maps for Enterprise + Dynamics CRM integration scenario beyond the two previous posts: Heat Maps with Bing Maps and Dynamics CRM... Read More With the Polaris release of Dynamics CRM Online, Bing Maps has been integrated directly into the Process forms for Accounts, Contacts and Leads. The integration is quite basic, however; the existing address details associated with the entity are geocoded when the form is displayed, and the results are used to show a map of the location. No additional data can be overlaid in the map, feedback on the quality of the geocode match are not provided, nor are the geocoded coordinates able to be refined and saved. In this post, I will demonstrate how we can extend beyond the basic ‘out of the box’ solution using Bing Maps, and also extend it to on-premises CRM deployments as well as online. We will add additional geo-location values to CRM, using the Bing Maps for Enterprise developer APIs to enhance our ability to capture address data quickly and accurately, visualize it on maps, manually adjust latitudes and longitudes with Bing Maps imagery, and use reverse geocoding to find approximate nearby addresses to a given point. This post will provide an additional Bing Maps for Enterprise + Dynamics CRM integration scenario beyond the two previous posts: Heat Maps with Bing Maps and Dynamics CRM... Read More