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Travel blog — May 2011

  • May
    31

    12 beautiful lakes

    I must confess a freakish fascination with lakes. One night at the tender age of 10, I dreamed I would swim out to the middle of Lake Candlewood in Connecticut. The next day, I did. In 2009, I decided to swim across Lake Washington near Seattle as part of the Swim for Life charity event. It was 2.5 miles, and it took me 2.5 hours. I’m now in training to do it again in August. What is it about lakes that draw me and countless others to their shores? Whether it’s Crater Lake in Oregon, Taal Lake in the Philippines or Lake Atitlán in Guatemala, these sparkling bodies of water seem to have a serenity that cannot be measured. In a new slide show on Bing Travel, our partner Budget Travel presents The 12 Most Beautiful Lakes in the World . These dozen lakes go to all the right extremes — highest, deepest, clearest — and showcase nature at its most spectacular. You can soak up the views from a boat, a cable car, a trailhead or a castle tower. What’s your candidate for most beautiful lake in the world? Share your thoughts with other travelers below. I must confess a freakish fascination with lakes. One night at the tender age of 10, I dreamed I would swim out to the middle of Lake Candlewood in Connecticut. The next day, I did. In 2009, I decided to swim across Lake Washington near Seattle as part of the Swim for Life charity event. It was 2.5 miles, and it took me 2.5 hours. I’m now in training to do it again in August. What is it about lakes that draw me and countless others to their shores? Whether it’s Crater Lake in Oregon, Taal Lake in the Philippines or Lake Atitlán in Guatemala, these sparkling bodies of water seem to have a serenity that cannot be measured. In a new slide show on Bing Travel, our partner Budget Travel presents The 12 Most Beautiful Lakes in the World . These dozen lakes go to all the right extremes — highest, deepest, clearest — and showcase nature at its most spectacular. You can soak up the views from a boat, a cable car, a trailhead or a castle tower. What’s your candidate for most beautiful lake in the world? Share your thoughts with other travelers below.
  • May
    27

    America’s must-see Civil War sites

    This Memorial Day weekend, Bing Travel takes a closer look at some of the most intriguing Civil War sites around the country. One hundred fifty years ago, the United States was plunging inexorably into the Civil War, in which more than 600,000 Americans died — almost as many as all other U.S. wars combined. Timed to coincide also with the sesquicentennial events that kick off this month all around the park system, this new slide show by Eric Lucas starts, appropriately, in Washington D.C.: “There is no more meaningful place to start — or finish — measuring the weight of America’s worst war than the beautiful monument to Abraham Lincoln that anchors one end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C. And to consider Lincoln’s charge at Gettysburg, which still rings today: “…To be dedicated to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus nobly advanced.” This Memorial Day weekend, Bing Travel takes a closer look at some of the most intriguing Civil War sites around the country. One hundred fifty years ago, the United States was plunging inexorably into the Civil War, in which more than 600,000 Americans died — almost as many as all other U.S. wars combined. Timed to coincide also with the sesquicentennial events that kick off this month all around the park system, this new slide show by Eric Lucas starts, appropriately, in Washington D.C.: “There is no more meaningful place to start — or finish — measuring the weight of America’s worst war than the beautiful monument to Abraham Lincoln that anchors one end of the National Mall in Washington, D.C. And to consider Lincoln’s charge at Gettysburg, which still rings today: “…To be dedicated to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus nobly advanced.”
  • May
    27

    Fun family reunion destinations

    Is a family reunion in your travel plans this summer? Talk about a challenging trip to plan: You have to find a place that satisfies multiple generations and multiple interests. The kids want a pool and horseback riding; the adults want great food and a spa. Grandma and grandpa want sightseeing -- the list goes on. Pauline Frommer, a regular contributor to Bing Travel, has created a slide show that will give reunion planners some great options around the country that will satisfy even the pickiest family members. From dude ranches to Disney World, these destinations sometimes even have a special reunion coordinator to help organize activities and accommodations for large groups. See her top 12 choices in the new slide show Fun Family Reunion Destinations , now live on Bing Travel. What’s the best reunion resort you've visited or trip you’ve taken? Leave a comment below. Is a family reunion in your travel plans this summer? Talk about a challenging trip to plan: You have to find a place that satisfies multiple generations and multiple interests. The kids want a pool and horseback riding; the adults want great food and a spa. Grandma and grandpa want sightseeing -- the list goes on. Pauline Frommer, a regular contributor to Bing Travel, has created a slide show that will give reunion planners some great options around the country that will satisfy even the pickiest family members. From dude ranches to Disney World, these destinations sometimes even have a special reunion coordinator to help organize activities and accommodations for large groups. See her top 12 choices in the new slide show Fun Family Reunion Destinations , now live on Bing Travel. What’s the best reunion resort you've visited or trip you’ve taken? Leave a comment below.
  • May
    26

    Dr. Beach’s Top 10 Beaches

    Memorial Day weekend is here, and it’s time again for Stephen Leatherman, aka “Dr. Beach,” to announce his annual list of Top 10 Beaches . This year’s winner may surprise you. Leatherman, the director of Florida International University’s Laboratory for Coastal Research, has chosen Siesta Beach in Sarasota, Fla., as his No. 1 pick based on 50 measurable criteria. It’s ironic, given that this strip of sand, along with many other Gulf Coast beaches, saw tourism plummet after the BP/Deep Horizon oil spill dumped 5 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico last year. As Leatherman notes, however, that visitation drop was unwarranted. He predicted that a Gulf of Mexico phenomenon known as the Loop Current would prevent oil from washing ashore on Siesta Beach, and he predicted correctly. Yet, visitors stayed away. We’ve seen this tourism fallout before. When the Exxon Valdez oil spill happened in 1989, people stopped going to Alaska. TV ads at the time provided a powerful visual: An extreme close-up of Marilyn Monroe’s face that made her beauty mark fill the entire TV screen. Just as one could not fault the Hollywood icon for... Read More Memorial Day weekend is here, and it’s time again for Stephen Leatherman, aka “Dr. Beach,” to announce his annual list of Top 10 Beaches . This year’s winner may surprise you. Leatherman, the director of Florida International University’s Laboratory for Coastal Research, has chosen Siesta Beach in Sarasota, Fla., as his No. 1 pick based on 50 measurable criteria. It’s ironic, given that this strip of sand, along with many other Gulf Coast beaches, saw tourism plummet after the BP/Deep Horizon oil spill dumped 5 million gallons of oil into the Gulf of Mexico last year. As Leatherman notes, however, that visitation drop was unwarranted. He predicted that a Gulf of Mexico phenomenon known as the Loop Current would prevent oil from washing ashore on Siesta Beach, and he predicted correctly. Yet, visitors stayed away. We’ve seen this tourism fallout before. When the Exxon Valdez oil spill happened in 1989, people stopped going to Alaska. TV ads at the time provided a powerful visual: An extreme close-up of Marilyn Monroe’s face that made her beauty mark fill the entire TV screen. Just as one could not fault the Hollywood icon for... Read More
  • May
    26

    Don’t let GPS help you get lost

    Travelers should never rely solely on technology for navigation, especially in the western United States, authorities remind us. Sure, technology is wonderful and helpful and even fun, but it also can be trouble. A particularly tragic example: Rita Chretien, a woman from Penticton, British Columbia, who survived seven weeks alone in rugged, isolated mountains in Nevada, told her pastor that her new global positioning device was the reason she and her husband, Albert, got lost. Her husband has not been seen since March 22, when he set out on foot to find help—even though he entered his plan in the GPS device. According to CBC News , Neil Allenbrand told the Penticton Herald that Chretien said the GPS in the couple's vehicle sent them in the wrong direction. “She said to me: ‘When we first went off the road, we thought it would just be a short road and we'd be back to the main road right away. The next thing we know, we turned down the wrong road and we were where we shouldn't be and it's dark and we can't find a way to turn around.’” Law enforcement and search-and-rescue officials said that too many travelers were letting technology give them a false sense of security, MSNBC reported... Read More Travelers should never rely solely on technology for navigation, especially in the western United States, authorities remind us. Sure, technology is wonderful and helpful and even fun, but it also can be trouble. A particularly tragic example: Rita Chretien, a woman from Penticton, British Columbia, who survived seven weeks alone in rugged, isolated mountains in Nevada, told her pastor that her new global positioning device was the reason she and her husband, Albert, got lost. Her husband has not been seen since March 22, when he set out on foot to find help—even though he entered his plan in the GPS device. According to CBC News , Neil Allenbrand told the Penticton Herald that Chretien said the GPS in the couple's vehicle sent them in the wrong direction. “She said to me: ‘When we first went off the road, we thought it would just be a short road and we'd be back to the main road right away. The next thing we know, we turned down the wrong road and we were where we shouldn't be and it's dark and we can't find a way to turn around.’” Law enforcement and search-and-rescue officials said that too many travelers were letting technology give them a false sense of security, MSNBC reported... Read More
  • May
    26

    Bing Travel Updates Have Arrived

    Over the past few weeks, we have released a bunch of new features to Bing Travel. As we highlighted last week, we are adding great social functionality to ensure your friends are part of your travel planning experience, but we also wanted to highlight some other features you can take advantage of in this release. Updated Places Pages We’ve continuously improved our Bing places pages, which pull together everything you need to know about a destination or your very own home. In this release we’ve improved the page layout and updated parts for weather, flights, related destinations, and local listings. This is your new one-stop-shop for cities, states, countries, and islands around the world. In addition, we’ve added new ways to get to the places pages from Bing.com. Our new instant answer even shows your friends who live in or near a city you’ve searched for. As with other social features, you will need to be logged into Facebook and have allowed Instant Personalization. Bing Travel Wish List Another exciting way to use our places pages is to add them to your Bing Travel Wish List in Facebook. Once you’ve chosen your dream destination... Read More Over the past few weeks, we have released a bunch of new features to Bing Travel. As we highlighted last week, we are adding great social functionality to ensure your friends are part of your travel planning experience, but we also wanted to highlight some other features you can take advantage of in this release. Updated Places Pages We’ve continuously improved our Bing places pages, which pull together everything you need to know about a destination or your very own home. In this release we’ve improved the page layout and updated parts for weather, flights, related destinations, and local listings. This is your new one-stop-shop for cities, states, countries, and islands around the world. In addition, we’ve added new ways to get to the places pages from Bing.com. Our new instant answer even shows your friends who live in or near a city you’ve searched for. As with other social features, you will need to be logged into Facebook and have allowed Instant Personalization. Bing Travel Wish List Another exciting way to use our places pages is to add them to your Bing Travel Wish List in Facebook. Once you’ve chosen your dream destination... Read More
  • May
    23

    More travelers in the sky this Memorial...

    As the long Memorial Day weekend draws near, I’m mourning a decision my husband and I finally made last week: We canceled our road trip to Eastern Washington for an event called Revelry on Red Mountain , which promises panoramic valley views and some of the best food and wine in the region. It’s a destination we’ve long intended to visit, and this event seemed the perfect opportunity. Alas, after tallying up expected costs for gas, lodging and a weekend baby sitter, we decided the trip fell into the indulgent column of our budget. Instead, we’re staying home and saving our travel dollars for family vacations to Napa and Chicago later this summer. Happily for the travel industry, we seem to be in the minority. According to AAA’s annual Memorial Day survey , more Americans will travel this holiday weekend than last year. It’s a slight increase – just 0.2 percent to 34.9 million – but still encouraging considering recent high gasoline prices and airfares. AAA attributes the gain to an 11.5 percent increase in air travel and an overall improved economy. Indeed, the number of travelers expected to drive to their destination declined slightly... Read More As the long Memorial Day weekend draws near, I’m mourning a decision my husband and I finally made last week: We canceled our road trip to Eastern Washington for an event called Revelry on Red Mountain , which promises panoramic valley views and some of the best food and wine in the region. It’s a destination we’ve long intended to visit, and this event seemed the perfect opportunity. Alas, after tallying up expected costs for gas, lodging and a weekend baby sitter, we decided the trip fell into the indulgent column of our budget. Instead, we’re staying home and saving our travel dollars for family vacations to Napa and Chicago later this summer. Happily for the travel industry, we seem to be in the minority. According to AAA’s annual Memorial Day survey , more Americans will travel this holiday weekend than last year. It’s a slight increase – just 0.2 percent to 34.9 million – but still encouraging considering recent high gasoline prices and airfares. AAA attributes the gain to an 11.5 percent increase in air travel and an overall improved economy. Indeed, the number of travelers expected to drive to their destination declined slightly... Read More
  • May
    23

    Changing views on Mexico

    The Mexican Tourism Board wants people in the U.S. to stop canceling trips to its country, while the U.S. State Department continues to issue warnings about travel there, and many Americans simply don’t heed travel warnings. Mexico is highlighting its ancient ruins and lovely beaches in a multimillion-dollar ad campaign to persuade Americans to stick with their plans for Mexican vacations. Print media and billboards are extolling the wonders of the country. The idea is to show that Mexico might have gruesome, drug-related violence but there are plenty of places that are not affected at all. An article by Reuters on MSNBC quoted Mexico Tourism Board CEO Rodolfo Lopez Negrete, “Those travel alerts that were headlining, ‘If you want to stay alive, don’t travel to Mexico,’ we felt they were not only totally inaccurate but irresponsible.” No doubt, the number of reports and the hideous details of the level of violence are daunting and could lead to the assumption that the country is in chaos. The State Department reissued its general warning about travel in Mexico, noting that “many people travel to Mexico without problems,” then added, “Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur... Read More The Mexican Tourism Board wants people in the U.S. to stop canceling trips to its country, while the U.S. State Department continues to issue warnings about travel there, and many Americans simply don’t heed travel warnings. Mexico is highlighting its ancient ruins and lovely beaches in a multimillion-dollar ad campaign to persuade Americans to stick with their plans for Mexican vacations. Print media and billboards are extolling the wonders of the country. The idea is to show that Mexico might have gruesome, drug-related violence but there are plenty of places that are not affected at all. An article by Reuters on MSNBC quoted Mexico Tourism Board CEO Rodolfo Lopez Negrete, “Those travel alerts that were headlining, ‘If you want to stay alive, don’t travel to Mexico,’ we felt they were not only totally inaccurate but irresponsible.” No doubt, the number of reports and the hideous details of the level of violence are daunting and could lead to the assumption that the country is in chaos. The State Department reissued its general warning about travel in Mexico, noting that “many people travel to Mexico without problems,” then added, “Crime and violence are serious problems and can occur... Read More
  • May
    19

    The world’s most colorful places

    When I visited Campeche, Mexico, about 10 years ago, I remember being overwhelmed with color. The houses and storefronts lining the streets of this seaside city are painted with cheery shades of yellow, red, blue and green, all reflecting the bright Caribbean sunlight like a living prism. I learned from talking to locals that the tradition of painting houses started during colonial times when the port was regularly attacked by pirates hoping to score some of the valuable porcelain, marble and linens flowing into Mexico. If your house looked wealthy, it was a natural target. So, the residents opted to use color as a more democratic – and safer – decoration. Campeche is one of the cities I chose to feature in the new Bing Travel slide show: The Most Colorful Places on Earth . As you’ll see, regardless of country, the tradition of painting houses bright colors often stems from colonial influence. Other times, ship paint was the only paint available to early settlers, so they used what was on hand and it stuck. Regardless, today these cities and towns are all fascinating destinations in their own right – the colors are just a bonus. If you’ve been to... Read More When I visited Campeche, Mexico, about 10 years ago, I remember being overwhelmed with color. The houses and storefronts lining the streets of this seaside city are painted with cheery shades of yellow, red, blue and green, all reflecting the bright Caribbean sunlight like a living prism. I learned from talking to locals that the tradition of painting houses started during colonial times when the port was regularly attacked by pirates hoping to score some of the valuable porcelain, marble and linens flowing into Mexico. If your house looked wealthy, it was a natural target. So, the residents opted to use color as a more democratic – and safer – decoration. Campeche is one of the cities I chose to feature in the new Bing Travel slide show: The Most Colorful Places on Earth . As you’ll see, regardless of country, the tradition of painting houses bright colors often stems from colonial influence. Other times, ship paint was the only paint available to early settlers, so they used what was on hand and it stuck. Regardless, today these cities and towns are all fascinating destinations in their own right – the colors are just a bonus. If you’ve been to... Read More
  • May
    17

    Travel during the school term

    A friend of mine recently jetted off to Spain for a two-week jaunt to Madrid and the Spanish coast. I’m completely jealous of her trip of course, and can’t wait to hear about her experiences. At the same time, I privately questioned the timing of her trip. Along with her husband, my friend is traveling with their two kids: a son in first grade (and my son’s best school pal) and a daughter in fourth grade. The kids will miss two weeks of school and return with just two weeks remaining before summer dismissal. I wondered: Won’t they miss some key learning? Will they fall behind their classmates, only to fall further behind during the long summer break? My son’s elementary school discourages family vacations during the school year. As the school handbook states: “Student achievement and classroom attendance are positively related. We cannot duplicate what happens in the classroom by only making up written work.” (Their underscore.) The school does not impose a penalty for missing school due to family vacations, but “catching up” is clearly up to the students – not the school. A recent report from TripAdvisor found that nearly half of parents in Britain have taken their families on holiday... Read More A friend of mine recently jetted off to Spain for a two-week jaunt to Madrid and the Spanish coast. I’m completely jealous of her trip of course, and can’t wait to hear about her experiences. At the same time, I privately questioned the timing of her trip. Along with her husband, my friend is traveling with their two kids: a son in first grade (and my son’s best school pal) and a daughter in fourth grade. The kids will miss two weeks of school and return with just two weeks remaining before summer dismissal. I wondered: Won’t they miss some key learning? Will they fall behind their classmates, only to fall further behind during the long summer break? My son’s elementary school discourages family vacations during the school year. As the school handbook states: “Student achievement and classroom attendance are positively related. We cannot duplicate what happens in the classroom by only making up written work.” (Their underscore.) The school does not impose a penalty for missing school due to family vacations, but “catching up” is clearly up to the students – not the school. A recent report from TripAdvisor found that nearly half of parents in Britain have taken their families on holiday... Read More
  • May
    16

    Gulf coast beaches: The coast is clear

    Five million barrels. That’s how much oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico last year after the disastrous BP oil spill. That’s 210 million U.S. gallons. It’s also the equivalent of 318 Olympic-sized swimming pools full of oil dumped into the Gulf. Beach lovers with skeptical minds are probably wondering: How on earth could it be safe to go back in the water? In a new article on Bing Travel, freelance contributor John Rosenthal answers that question. It’s called Gulf Coast Beaches: Swim, Dine, Fish. And Thank the Loop Current. Rosenthal, an avid fisherman, interviews scientists, tourism officials and fishing experts to conclude: “Visitors should feel confident relaxing on the beach, swimming in the water, fishing in the Gulf and eating the local seafood.” He even describes his recent haul of 16 redfish and 14 speckled trout during a Louisiana fishing expedition. Have you visited a Gulf Coast beach since the BP oil spill, and what was your experience? Share your thoughts with other travelers. Five million barrels. That’s how much oil spilled into the Gulf of Mexico last year after the disastrous BP oil spill. That’s 210 million U.S. gallons. It’s also the equivalent of 318 Olympic-sized swimming pools full of oil dumped into the Gulf. Beach lovers with skeptical minds are probably wondering: How on earth could it be safe to go back in the water? In a new article on Bing Travel, freelance contributor John Rosenthal answers that question. It’s called Gulf Coast Beaches: Swim, Dine, Fish. And Thank the Loop Current. Rosenthal, an avid fisherman, interviews scientists, tourism officials and fishing experts to conclude: “Visitors should feel confident relaxing on the beach, swimming in the water, fishing in the Gulf and eating the local seafood.” He even describes his recent haul of 16 redfish and 14 speckled trout during a Louisiana fishing expedition. Have you visited a Gulf Coast beach since the BP oil spill, and what was your experience? Share your thoughts with other travelers.
  • May
    13

    Rules of the load

    I’d bet that at least once, while you were standing in line to board an airplane, you thought, “There must be a better way.” Well, there is, and you can thank mathematics for it. Jason Steffen, a German astrophysicist, agreed with you and set about finding the best way to load a plane. In his book, “100 Essential Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know: Math Explains Your World,” John D. Barrow explains what happened. Steffen used “a simple computer simulation that could accommodate changes in boarding strategy and add in as many random variations that perturb the best-laid plans.” “If passengers in all even-numbered rows with window seats board first, they have a clear row of aisle space in front and behind and don’t get in each others’ way while stowing bags. Everyone can load bags at the same time. If anyone needs to pass, then there are spare aisles to step into. By beginning from the back, the need to pass other passengers is avoided again.” Once those folks are aboard, the people sitting in the middle seats, then the aisle seats follow. Then people in the odd-numbered rows follow the same pattern. “The computer model showed that over hundreds of trials with different small variations... Read More I’d bet that at least once, while you were standing in line to board an airplane, you thought, “There must be a better way.” Well, there is, and you can thank mathematics for it. Jason Steffen, a German astrophysicist, agreed with you and set about finding the best way to load a plane. In his book, “100 Essential Things You Didn’t Know You Didn’t Know: Math Explains Your World,” John D. Barrow explains what happened. Steffen used “a simple computer simulation that could accommodate changes in boarding strategy and add in as many random variations that perturb the best-laid plans.” “If passengers in all even-numbered rows with window seats board first, they have a clear row of aisle space in front and behind and don’t get in each others’ way while stowing bags. Everyone can load bags at the same time. If anyone needs to pass, then there are spare aisles to step into. By beginning from the back, the need to pass other passengers is avoided again.” Once those folks are aboard, the people sitting in the middle seats, then the aisle seats follow. Then people in the odd-numbered rows follow the same pattern. “The computer model showed that over hundreds of trials with different small variations... Read More
  • May
    05

    All aboard, ‘trainiacs’

    You know who you are! Conductor’s hats off to anyone who’s ever taken a train trip just for fun. Saturday, May 7, is National Train Day and the 40th anniversary of Amtrak, so to mark the occasion, Bing Travel has just posted a new article by a confessed trainiac that outlines some of the most beautiful railroad routes in America, for both day trippers and those seeking a longer journey. Check it out at America’s Greatest Train Trips . It’s hard to believe that America lags so far behind Europe, Asia and other parts of the world when it comes to railroad infrastructure. Currently, America has only one high-speed rail line, the Acela, running from Boston to Washington, D.C. President Obama’s $8 billion proposal to build high-speed rail across the country could be a boon to leisure and business travelers – especially at a time when gas prices are topping $4 a gallon and airlines are starting to pass along fuel costs to passengers. Not only that, but building more national railways could create much-needed jobs. What’s not to love? What do you think? Tell us by leaving a comment below. You know who you are! Conductor’s hats off to anyone who’s ever taken a train trip just for fun. Saturday, May 7, is National Train Day and the 40th anniversary of Amtrak, so to mark the occasion, Bing Travel has just posted a new article by a confessed trainiac that outlines some of the most beautiful railroad routes in America, for both day trippers and those seeking a longer journey. Check it out at America’s Greatest Train Trips . It’s hard to believe that America lags so far behind Europe, Asia and other parts of the world when it comes to railroad infrastructure. Currently, America has only one high-speed rail line, the Acela, running from Boston to Washington, D.C. President Obama’s $8 billion proposal to build high-speed rail across the country could be a boon to leisure and business travelers – especially at a time when gas prices are topping $4 a gallon and airlines are starting to pass along fuel costs to passengers. Not only that, but building more national railways could create much-needed jobs. What’s not to love? What do you think? Tell us by leaving a comment below.
  • May
    05

    14 bizarre museums

    Yearning to see Picassos, dinosaur bones or World War II airplanes? No problem. Visit the stately Louvre in Paris, the vast Smithsonian Institution complex in Washington, D.C., or the Museum of Flight in Seattle. What if you’d rather see Mae West’s chauffeur-driven lounge car, a cockroach dressed like Liberace or a totally awesome collection of barbed wire? In that case, you’ll want to peruse Bing Travel’s newest slide show, 14 Bizarre Museums . It’s a pictorial essay of stellar destinations such as the RV Hall of Fame and Museum, the Museum of Bad Art, the Barbed Wire Museum and the Cockroach Hall of Fame and Museum. And yes, the latter actually has a tiny specimen named “Liberoachi.” You’ll find him a few antennae lengths from “Marilyn Monroach.” Do you have a favorite bizarre museum? Give other travelers a laugh. Post a comment below. Yearning to see Picassos, dinosaur bones or World War II airplanes? No problem. Visit the stately Louvre in Paris, the vast Smithsonian Institution complex in Washington, D.C., or the Museum of Flight in Seattle. What if you’d rather see Mae West’s chauffeur-driven lounge car, a cockroach dressed like Liberace or a totally awesome collection of barbed wire? In that case, you’ll want to peruse Bing Travel’s newest slide show, 14 Bizarre Museums . It’s a pictorial essay of stellar destinations such as the RV Hall of Fame and Museum, the Museum of Bad Art, the Barbed Wire Museum and the Cockroach Hall of Fame and Museum. And yes, the latter actually has a tiny specimen named “Liberoachi.” You’ll find him a few antennae lengths from “Marilyn Monroach.” Do you have a favorite bizarre museum? Give other travelers a laugh. Post a comment below.
  • May
    04

    Pa. town changes name to movie title

    Flying to Central Pennsylvania in the next 60 days? Make your reservation not for Altoona but for “POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.” (Airport code still to come; perhaps NUTS.) Can this be for real? Let’s separate fact from fiction. The city earned $25,000 (real) for changing its name to the title of Morgan Spurlock’s most recent documentary (real), which makes a mockery of how almost anything in America can have a commercial sponsor; he sold several companies the rights to appear in the film. Now, in a version of shaking the pom-poms for the movie, the city’s public trucks are all in the shop, having their new name stenciled on the doors (no, not real). This is not a formal change. The deal for naming rights was brokered with the help of the Sheetz convenience store chain, an Altoona-based company that paid what could total $250,000 (depending on the film’s revenue) for a role, The Associated Press reported. (Seems unreal, but it’s real). Spurlock, after savoring a delicious taste of the city, planned to be at the local premiere on May 4. -posted by Joanne Garrett, Bing Travel Flying to Central Pennsylvania in the next 60 days? Make your reservation not for Altoona but for “POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold.” (Airport code still to come; perhaps NUTS.) Can this be for real? Let’s separate fact from fiction. The city earned $25,000 (real) for changing its name to the title of Morgan Spurlock’s most recent documentary (real), which makes a mockery of how almost anything in America can have a commercial sponsor; he sold several companies the rights to appear in the film. Now, in a version of shaking the pom-poms for the movie, the city’s public trucks are all in the shop, having their new name stenciled on the doors (no, not real). This is not a formal change. The deal for naming rights was brokered with the help of the Sheetz convenience store chain, an Altoona-based company that paid what could total $250,000 (depending on the film’s revenue) for a role, The Associated Press reported. (Seems unreal, but it’s real). Spurlock, after savoring a delicious taste of the city, planned to be at the local premiere on May 4. -posted by Joanne Garrett, Bing Travel