NEW YORK (AP) -- Never mind the 40-foot snake that menaced Jennifer ... The discoverers of the snake named it Titanoboa cerrejonensis ("ty-TAN-o-BO-ah sare-ah-HONE-en-siss"). That means "titanic boa ...
The lifelike model is on loan from the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service through March 17. Can't catch it in Utah? Check out Titanoboa at the New York/New Jersey Mineral, Fossil, ...
New York commuters arriving at Grand Central Station were greeted by a monstrous sight: a 48-foot-long, 2,500-pound titanoboa snake. The good news: It's not alive. Anymore. But the full-scale replica ...
It is the biggest snake to have ever roamed the planet, and it is coming to New York City. Titanoboa is 48' long, dates to the Paleocene epoch more than 60 million years ago, and can be seen for the ...
And for the past two years, a full-scale replica of the giant snake has been on tour, with stops in New York City, Washington, D.C., and Gainesville, Fla. On Saturday, the "Titanoboa: Monster Snake" ...
The film has been promoted with a life-size statue which was on show in New York's Grand Central. Dr. Jonathan Bloch, a paleontologist and curator at the Florida Museum of Natural History was part of ...
“To bring titanoboa home is fantastic. This is the high point for me,” Head said.The exhibit has already made stops in New York, Washington, D.C., and Florida.Head hopes the snake teaches people about ...
NEW YORK – A strange sight accosted visitors at Grand Central Station last week: a gigantic snake. A life-size model of the 60-million-year-old Titanoboa has taken stage at the train terminal, an ...
NEW YORK, N.Y.—A prehistoric monster snake is making a quick stopover in New York City’s Grand Central Terminal. The full-scale replica of the Titanoboa was unveiled Thursday as a promotion for an ...
Don't look now but another snake is on the loose in New York City, but this one didn't escape from the Bronx Zoo. The Smithsonian Channel brought a 48-foot long replica of the Titanoboa to Grand ...
Turns out, it belonged to a snake that the researchers now call Titanoboa. At more than 40 feet long and weighing ... got his big break in 1977 while he was performing at a small New York club for ...
New York commuters arriving at Grand Central Station were greeted by a monstrous sight: a 48-foot-long, 2,500-pound titanoboa snake. The good news: It's not alive. Anymore. But the full-scale replica ...