Not unlike a mummy, the reanimated corpse of a bad bill that just doesn ... the depth and breadth of NSA snooping have given rise to a tide of talks about privacy rights. That, too, might change some of the feeling behind CISPA this time …
Given the revelations attributed to National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden starting ... about the communications of American citizens — an attempt to pass a CISPA-like bill in both chambers of Congress could be …
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once the government gets expansive national security authorities, there's no going back. We encourage the Senate to let this horrible bill fade into obscurity." The Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT), whose initial opposition …
Privacy groups also objected to the bill because they said it would give the National Security Agency a front-row seat in analyzing data from private computer networks. The bill doesn't address the NSA's role specifically, but it's presumed …
Next up: CISPA, a bill that would essentially nullify current privacy laws and set companies up to share data about users with the government without the need for court orders. CISPA would amend the National Security Act of 1947 — …
But now an even scarier Bill has just been passed by the ... of the “unofficial” Jewish Caucus members pushing CISPA in the House of Representatives and Senate that have control of the national security and intelligence committees …
Mike Rogers, a Michigan Republican and then chair of the House's Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, put forward a bill ... CISPA also contains language prohibiting the Department of Defense, intelligence community and …
Sponsors of the controversial Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA ... The bill, HR 3523, aims to broaden the means for communication between private companies and the federal government on issues of cybersecurity and …
Backers expect CISPA to pass ... your personal information with the National Security Agency and the CIA, as long as that information is deemed to pertain to a cyber threat or to national security. How does the bill define "cyber threat"?
"CISPA does not authorize the government to monitor your computer or read your emails, Tweets and Facebook," he says. "It's clearly what the bill does not do ... As usual, the government is using national security concerns to justify the …