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NASA and Verizon are ... avoidance - both between drones and between UAVs and buildings - and flight priority, but also include more complex functionality. For instance, UAVs could automatically be grounded in poor weather conditions, while certain areas ...
SlashGear · 6/4/2015
However, NASA has told the New York Times that actual ... For one, a decent gust could easily push a drone into a building and crash it, so tracking weather would be a must, adding a layer of complexity. Maintaining separation between low-flying drones ...
Engadget · BySteve Dent · 9/2/2014
NASA is considering monitoring drones with a range of sensors including radar, orbiting satellites and cellphone signals. The UTM system is also likely to be cloud-based, meaning that drones will need an internet link to download information about weather ...
Gizmodo · ByJamie Condliffe · 6/4/2015
A new air traffic control system announced today by Exelis Inc. offers just that option. The drone autopilot company has partnered with NASA to create a system of ... terrain below and information about the weather. With this information, the FAA would ...
Popular Science · 3/11/2015
NASA drones will fly this August to investigate hurricane ... "African Saharan dust suppresses tropical development," said AccuWeather Senior Meteorologist Bob Smerbeck. "It's hard to produce anything in African dust." Every summer, impulses come …
AccuWeather · 8/2/2013
The weather agency issued warnings for flooding ... they are the size of large commercial jets and are flown remotely from a NASA base on the Virginia coast. The drones are capable of flying for 30 hours at an altitude of 21,000 meters (69,000 feet ...
Space Daily · 9/15/2013
and even the ability to ground drones because of bad weather. They system could also potentially prioritize air traffic in high-density areas. (Unfortunately, NASA and Verizon's system probably would not have saved Enrique Iglesias from his drone-related ...
Slate · 6/4/2015
The two Global Hawk drones are a central part of NASA's five-year HS3 (Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel) Mission investigating why certain weather patterns become hurricanes, and why some hurricanes grow into monster storms. The massive drones ...
NPR News · ByJon Hamilton · 9/13/2013
Why do some hurricanes intensify very rapidly while others do not? That’s the big question that NASA scientists are grappling with – and they’ve launched a set of repurposed military surveillance drones to find answers. In order to better understand ...
Inhabitat · ByHelen Morgan · 12/9/2013
and what the weather will be like in a given area," said Parimal Kopardekar, manager of NASA's Safe Autonomous Systems Operations project, in the press release. The system NASA is working on would allow many commercial uses, like Amazon's drone
Fierce Mobile T · 6/11/2015