This is something college football has and will keep going through. In the 1990s, if Luke Gifford made the same hit he made on Fresno State’s quarterback Chase Virgil, it would have been a good hard hit. Times have changed. Gifford got tossed …
The targeting call has been the center of much debate in college football circles. In an age where concussions are front and center on the football forefront, the targeting rule was created to protect “defenseless” ball carriers from vicious …
College football coaches don't have to worry about the death of the hurry-up offense, as it turns out. Additionally, the upheaval over 15-yard penalties from overturned targeting calls will end as well. ESPN's Brett McMurphy tweeted …
Targeting
The NCAA Football Rules Committee proposed an alteration involving the instant-replay review on targeting fouls during its Feb. 11-12 meeting in Indianapolis, which includes the ejection of the player committing the foul along with a 15-yard …
Berry Tramel breaks down targeting and the details of the NCAA's rules on targeting. The only difference in targeting rules for the 2013 college football season is the enforcement. Players penalized for targeting now must sit out the rest …
Oklahoma
A proposed NCAA rule change could reduce the number of targeting ejections in college football in 2017. According to a CBS Sports report, the NCAA will consider ejecting players only after a targeting call has been confirmed after review. …
College football
One spectator sees an egregious foul. Another sees incidental contact. One sees the receiver duck his head toward the incoming collision. Another sees the safety launching like a torpedo. And sometimes, no one sees what the official …
The NCAA changed the wording to its targeting rule Friday in direct response to the helmet-to-helmet hit sustained last week by Stanford receiver Francis Owusu. Owusu suffered a concussion when he collided with UCLA’s Tahaan …
Not so fast, college football offenses. A proposed change by the NCAA football rules committee would prohibit offenses from snapping the ball until at least 10 seconds had run off the 40-second play clock, slowing down the up-tempo, no …
It’s not hyperbole to suggest that no issue threatens college football’s long-term viability – not conference expansion, or the oft-rumored breakaway of the Power Five, or even shifting spectator demographics – more than that of player safety.