The clock, which uses atoms of the rare earth element ytterbium, is being built by researchers led ... and the only southern hemisphere based clock in the international Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) project. ACES is …
... precise than the caesium atomic clocks which presently determine time. The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is even working on several of such optical clocks simultaneously. The model with one single ytterbium ion …
This is not the first time a cesium-alternative atomic clock has made headlines for record-breaking feats. In August 2013 the NIST reported a pair of Ytterbium atomic clocks set records for being the most stable time-keeping devices ever. …
The more stable the clock, the better its measurement power. The new ytterbium lattice 'double clock' is the most …
Every single GPS satellite is home to a family of atomic ... comes lots of new opportunities for discovery and applications. Here at the University of Western Australia our research group is building an optical lattice clock based …
US scientists said Thursday they have built the world’s most precise clock, whose ticking rate varies less than two parts in one quintillion, or 10 times better than any other. The clock, made from the element ytterbium ... But the new
they introduced another atomic clock based on the element ytterbium that performs similarly to the strontium clock. “Exquisitely precise timing is built into every aspect of modern infrastructure,” NIST official Thomas O’Brian told the …
As reported in Physical Review Letters, an experimental atomic ... ytterbium clock gives the time standards community more options in the ongoing development and comparisons of next-generation clocks, says NIST physicist Chris …
The new clock can beat the cesium clock, a type of atomic clock that an international body of experts has used to define the unit of one second. It is about 9.19 billion oscillations. The oscillations per second in the ytterbium clock
Another check involves comparing the ticking of different types of atomic clocks. The NIST scientists and colleagues at JILA, a research institute down the road in Boulder, are doing just that, comparing the ytterbium ... agree on a new