A new research study combining marine physiology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and behavioral psychology has revealed a surprising outcome from increases of carbon dioxide uptake in the oceans: anxious fish. Scientists have shown for …
The temperature and acidity in the Mediterranean Sea are rising, and researchers are worried it will lead to extinction of native species. Villefranche-sur-Mer oceanographic laboratory in the south of France released a study that said the …
The third in a series. To see the first two parts, click here and here. Many of the projected effects of climate change on the world's oceans are already visible, such as melting polar ice caps and rising sea levels. But invisible changes may be …
Increasing levels of carbon dioxide in our atmosphere are changing ocean chemistry, making seawater more acidic. This poses a potential threat to some sea life as it creates conditions for animals to take up more coastal pollutants like …
Matt Huelsenbeck is a marine scientist for the climate and energy campaign at Oceana. This article was adapted from one that first appeared on The Beacon. Huelsenbeck contributed this article to LiveScience’s Expert Voices: Op-Ed & …
The panel, comprising 155 scientists from 26 countries and other international groups, is not the first to point to growing ocean acidity as an environmental threat. For example, a group of eminent scientists convened by The Nature …
So, how do scientists know that the observed decrease in average ocean pH - or rising acidity - over the past two hundred years is the direct result of human activities? The short answer is because theory (i.e., the laws of physics and …
Rates of ocean acidification ever 10 years since 1800 and projected through ... He likened it to the Keeling Curve, which has charted the rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide since 1957. But while the baseline might be a jackpot for scientific …
Climate change’s oft ignored twin, ocean acidification, is usually thought of as a biological rather than a climatic problem. They’re seen as parallel (carbon dioxide emissions are a cause of each) but separate (the effects of ocean
The acidity level of the world's oceans continues to rise at an unprecedented rate and could more than double by 2100, according to a new study. The seas have already acidified by 26 percent since industrialization began two centuries …