Aired 12/20/11 on KPBS News. The burning of fossil fuels is causing a rise of acid levels in the ocean, and it may be harming sea life, according to a new study by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The …
Fossil fuel
Rising ocean acidity is now considered to be just as much of a formidable threat to the health of Earth’s environment as the atmospheric climate changes brought on by pumping out greenhouse gases. Scientists …
Rivals
in length and is a bait popular with anglers − is being affected by rising levels of acid in the coastal seas. The acid is reported also to be affecting sea urchins. This is further confirmation that ocean acidification is …
Ecology
An ocean made of acid that corrodes the shells of sea life seems like an image out of science fiction. Sadly, it’s becoming just science. The acidity of the world’s oceans is increasing at an unprecedented pace and is …
Major
The problem is with the water, of course—its pH had dropped too much—but ... with an emphasis on how the global carbon cycle and ocean ecology respond to natural and human-driven climate change. Funding for …
PBS3y
The Arctic Ocean’s acidity level is rising at an alarming rate due to changes in the global carbon cycle. Scientists with the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme in Oslo, Norway are concerned about the …
Ocean acidification caused by increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is eating away at the shells of marine snails known as “sea butterflies”, the researchers said. © David Liittschwager Rising amounts of …
The Independent
Ocean acidification is often referred to as ‘the other carbon dioxide problem’. We’re all quite rightly concerned about the effects that rising atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may have on climate, and the potential …
Ocean acidification
There, carbon dioxide turns into carbonic acid. And that turns ocean water corrosive, particularly to shellfish and corals. Biologists are now coming to realize that rising acid levels in the ocean can affect many other forms …
NPR
A new research study combining marine physiology, neuroscience, pharmacology, and behavioral psychology has revealed a surprising outcome from increases of carbon dioxide uptake in the oceans: anxious fish. A growing …