The burning of fossil fuels is causing a rise of acid levels in the ocean, and it may be harming sea life, according to a new study by researchers at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The burning of fossil fuels is causing a rise of acid
There, carbon dioxide turns into carbonic acid. And that turns ocean water corrosive, particularly to shellfish and corals. Biologists are now coming to realize that rising acid levels in the ocean can affect many other forms of sea life as well.
The shells of some marine snails in the seas around Antarctica are dissolving as the water becomes more acidic, threatening the food chain, a study published in the journal Nature Geoscience said on Sunday. The tiny snails, known …
Portner, is a meta-analysis looking at the specific effects rising acid levels are likely to have on specific categories of ocean life: corals, echinoderms, molluscs, crustaceans and fishes. Every category is projected to respond poorly to …
SYDNEY—Oceansrising acid levels have emerged as one of the biggest threats to coral reefs, acting as the “osteoporosis of the sea” and threatening everything from food security to tourism to livelihoods, the head of a U.S. …
The findings, published in the journal Science, shed light on the dangers of rising ocean acidity – a phenomenon ... which are closely linked to levels of ocean acidification, as well as certain carbon isotopes, which are often used to study …
It emerges that all the oceans, which together absorb close to one quarter of the CO2 emissions generated by human activity, have experienced an overall 26 percent rise in acidity since the dawn of the industrial age. Twenty-four million …
A new report from the UN Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) meeting in South Korea says that ocean acidification has risen ... said the ocean’s pH level was falling — a benchmark of rising acidity — and the consequences would be …
IN the week of Scott Morrison’s first budget, 330 scientists in Hobart were focusing on the astonishingly rapid shift in global ocean chemistry. The fourth international conference on “the ocean in a high-CO2 world” looked at how rising carbon ...
WASHINGTON — With the oceans absorbing more than 1 million tons of carbon dioxide an hour, a National Research Council study released Thursday found that the level of acid in the oceans is increasing at an unprecedented rate and …