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Remote-controlled aircraft were developed for military purposes and are a controversial tool in U.S. anti-terrorism campaigns, but the technology's falling price means it is increasingly used for civilian and commercial projects around the world.
Reuters · ByMitra Taj · 8/26/2013
LIMA, PeruDrones sent up to study the Nazca Lines in Peru show that a protest against global warming by the environment action group Greenpeace permanently damaged an area around the famed geoglyphs, the government said. Culture Minister Diana …
Wall Street Journal · ByRobert Kozak · 12/15/2014
Peru has turned to drones to survey its vast wealth of archaeology sites and ancient ruins, thousands of which have yet to be mapped and excavated. The unmanned aircraft typically smaller from the ones employed in military actions or anti-terror strikes.
Sky News HD · 8/25/2013
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It makes sense that Brazil may take a lead in this endeavor, as it already produces drones, but other countries, including Argentina, Colombia, Chile, Ecuador, and Peru, can provide technological expertise due totheir own production and usage of drones.[
Eurasia Review · 1/13/2015
Last week, amid the United Nations’ climate talks in Lima, Peru, members of Greenpeace made a serious pro-sustainability statement. They arranged huge yellow letters to form the message “Time for change! The future is renewable. Greenpeace.”
Slate · 12/17/2014
Last week, Greenpeace activists provoked international outrage when they undertook a publicity stunt, trespassing on the Nazca Lines World Heritage Site. Newly released done footage shows how much damage they left behind. As PBS Newshour reports …
Io9 · 12/16/2014
Drones are most often associated with assassinations in remote regions of Pakistan and Yemen but in Peru, unmanned aircraft are being used to monitor crops and study ancient ruins. Forget Reapers and Predators -- the drones used here are hand-held ...
Yahoo! · 8/15/2013
In Peru, home to the spectacular Inca city of Machu Picchu and thousands of ancient ruins, archaeologists are turning to drones to speed up sluggish survey work and protect sites from squatters, builders and miners. Remote-controlled aircraft were ...
News Max · 8/27/2013
LIMA — In Peru, home to the spectacular Inca city of Machu Picchu and thousands of ancient ruins, archaeologists are turning to drones to speed up sluggish survey work and protect sites from squatters, builders and miners. Remote-controlled aircraft were ...
The Columbus Dispatch · 9/15/2013
Peru, home to the spectacular Inca city of Machu Picchu and thousands of ancient ruins, archaeologists are turning to drones to speed up sluggish survey work and protect sites from squatters, builders and miners. Remote-controlled aircraft were developed ...
CBC · 8/27/2013