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To respond, Peru is creating a drone air force to map, monitor and safeguard its endangered treasures. Read the article and answer the news questions below. In “New to the Archaeologist’s Tool Kit: The Drone,” William Neuman and Ralph Blumenthal ...
New York Times Blogs · ByMichael Gonchar · 8/15/2014
Remote-controlled aircraft were developed for military purposes and are a controversial tool in US anti-terrorism campaigns, but the technology's falling price means it is increasingly used for civilian and commercial projects around the world. Small ...
The Malaysian Insider · 8/25/2013
Recently-released drone footage shows just how bad Greenpeace’s recent stunt caused to the ancient Nazca lines in Peru, and authorities are saying it may be hundreds or even thousands of years before the damage is done. Last week, according to this ...
The Inquisitr · 12/16/2014
Drones have seen a lot of bad press and idiotic hype that has ... A great example of that is work being done by the Amazon Basin Conservation Association in Peru, as detailed by NPR. Using a custom UAV, the group is scanning large sections of the rain ...
Engadget · BySteve Dent · 6/8/2015
DRONES ARE MOST often associated with assassinations in remote regions of Pakistan and Yemen but in Peru, unmanned aircraft are being used to monitor crops and study ancient ruins. Forget Reapers and Predators – the drones used here are …
thejournal.ie · 8/18/2013
Archaeologists in Peru are using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), or drones, to map and protect the ruins of Inca and over 13,000 ancient sites across the South American country. Originally designed for military warfare, they have been deployed to attack ...
International Business Times · 8/26/2013
Lima - In Peru, home to the spectacular Inca city of Machu Picchu and thousands of ancient ruins, archaeologists are turning to drones to speed up sluggish survey work and protect sites from squatters, builders and miners. Remote-controlled aircraft were ...
Independent Online · 8/26/2013
Small drones have been helping a growing number of researchers produce three-dimensional models of Peruvian sites instead of the usual flat maps - and in days and weeks instead of months and years. Speed is an important ally to archaeologists here.
Chicago Tribune · 8/25/2013
Forest guardians can't be everywhere at once, and that's why drones are coming in to help. It might be illegal to cut down a tree in certain parts of Peru's Amazon rainforest, but that doesn't mean it's hard to do. With limited resources, official patrols ...
Co.EXIST · 6/3/2015
There is debate within the archaeological community over whether civilizations ever ... A famous example of a geoglyph in Peru that resembles a hummingbird (Dennis Jarvis/Flickr) He and his colleagues plan to fly a drone, which looks like a miniature ...
The Atlantic · 3/7/2015