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They concluded that there could be as many as 400 billion of these wandering planets, far outnumbering main-sequence stars such as our Sun. Their work is published today in Nature 1. Study author Takahiro Sumi, an astrophysicist at Osaka University in ...
Nature · 5/20/2011
Try "ineligible retriever downfield." But there's no comparable Super Bowl penalty for one of the most common calls in the Puppy Bowl. "Fornication was outlawed by Animal Planet," Schachner said. "It happens, and we …
The Sun-Times · 16 hours ago
But, so far, no large planets beyond Pluto have been found ... objects beyond Pluto must have a semi-major axis – the axis which defines a planet’s farthest point from the sun – with a value close to 150 AU (or 150 times the distance between the ...
EarthSky · 1/15/2015
That’s two to the power of 64 planets, which Sean tells us would take about five billion years to explore if you spent one second on each; and that's with no bathroom breaks. Given that the Earth’s sun has about 4.6 billion years of fuel left before it ...
IGN · 8/15/2014
because no such planets were observed in the Kepler data. Based on extrapolations from only the 10 planets found orbiting 42,000 stars they contend that about 22 percent of sun-like stars observed by Kepler have earth-size, potentially habitable planets.
World · 11/26/2013
Artist's drawing of a trans-Neptunian object, far beyond the Sun ... planets would need, except to say they would need “at least several Earth masses” to affect the TNOs. Again, the evidence they present is interesting, maybe even compelling, but it by ...
Slate · 1/21/2015
more stable orbits around the Sun. And if we were unlucky, they’d collide with each other, forming a new super-sized Earth, killing everything on both planets, obviously.” A Nemesis star would fare no better, according to researchers. In order to avoid ...
The Inquisitr · 2/23/2015
But beyond that — in addition to the stars — there are hundreds of billions of planets with no central stars at all ... Not only are M-class stars — stars between 8% and 40% of the Sun’s mass — the most common type of star in the Universe ...
ScienceBlogs · 9/12/2013
As Pluto is no more counted as a planet, Neptune is the last planet in our solar system. It is 30,775 miles (49,528 km) in diameter, and is located at a distance of 30.06 AU from the Sun. It has 13 moons and rings around it, and is mostly made up of ice ...
Buzzle · 7/26/2010
There's no way these overlapping paths should remain stable ... who was not involved in the new study. Planet Nine may have formed closer to the sun but was hurled out of the area thanks to the gravitational influence …
Sci-Tech Today · 1/25/2016
Planet