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But there’s one choice you can make that can be relatively easy: reinvesting stock dividends. It’s simple to reinvest dividends — you just need to sign up for a dividend reinvestment plan (DRIP). Once you do, you won’t receive dividends directly as ...
Moapa Valley Progress · 12/11/2013
But you don't need access to vast wealth to increase your share ownership – you just need to consistently reinvest your stock dividends. Just how important are reinvested dividends to wealth accumulation, as compared to capital gains (the increase in ...
North Jersey · 11/18/2011
PLANS through which shareholders can automatically reinvest their dividends in a company's stock instead of receiving cash have been a fixture on the American business scene for more than 15 years. But a slowing growth rate for the plans has spurred ...
New York Times · 4/6/1985
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But you don't need access to vast wealth to increase your share ownership; you just need to consistently reinvest your stock dividends. Just how important are reinvested dividends to wealth accumulation, as compared to capital gains (the increase in stock ...
San Antonio Express-News · 9/29/2011
Q. Nine months ago, I put some of the individual retirement account funds I have at a brokerage house into a utility stock with a 7.62 percent dividend yield. I did this after making sure all dividends would be reinvested to buy more shares. The statements ...
SunSentinel · 5/25/1992
In this installment of our "Ask a Fool" series, Fool contributor Dan Caplinger answers a reader's question about when you shouldn't reinvest dividends. Dan notes that reinvesting dividends can work out badly if a stock stumbles, and so you should closely ...
Daily Finance · ByDan Caplinger · 5/27/2013
We're @FairfaxMoney Even if you're comfortable that a stock is cheap, it may not be the best use of your funds. So happy in fact that some retail investors have encouraged the company to reinstate its dividend reinvestment plan (DRP). And Telstra has …
Sydney Morning Herald · 2/23/2015
Your cost basis, or just plain basis, in a stock is what you've paid for the investment, including commissions and any reinvested dividends. The basis is important because it's used to calculate what you owe in capital gains taxes, which is probably why so ...
usatoday30.usatoday.com · 7/14/2009
Finally, there is a place for investors who want to fill their own retirement accounts with dividend reinvestment stocks that they buy directly without brokers or commissions. Investors have always been able to buy stocks from the 1,000 or so companies ...
Orlando Sentinel · 11/2/1995
Take two stocks in the same industry. One has zero capital costs. It's a royalty firm, in one form or another. The other is a typical corporation that continues to reinvest its profits in capital projects. After all, almost all …
Daily Wealth · ByPorter Stansberry · 6/25/2015