There's no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, but I'm generally a big fan of dividend reinvestment plans (DRIPs) and enroll every dividend stock that I buy. As the name implies, a DRIP is designed to allow investors to use their dividends …
The investment staff of the $300 billion California Public Employees’ Retirement System fund is urging the board to reverse its long-standing policy and invest pension money into tobacco stock ... out in a letter opposing reinvestment that …
However if the cost of keeping tax records on all your reinvestments is going to be prohibitive, or you think your stock is overvalued, then perhaps you should avoid reinvesting. Essentially, a dividend reinvestment plan is a low cost way …
U.S. multinationals have as much as $1.8 trillion in what are called "permanently reinvested earnings" offshore ... that tax holiday in net terms funded shareholder dividends and stock buy-backs, not structural investments in the U.S. real …
In their most basic form, dividend reinvestment plans -- also called DRIPs -- allow investors to purchase shares of stock and reinvest their dividends for additional shares, which compound over time. "These plans are a terrific way to …
According to data from S&P Capital IQ presented in The Wall Street Journal, corporate profits are increasingly being directed back to shareholders as dividends or stock buybacks instead of being reinvested into the businesses as …
With price consciousness and diversification so vital to investors in an uncertain year, dividend-reinvestment plans fit right in. DRIPs, as they are commonly called, are company-run plans that allow you to invest in a firm's stock with a modest …