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Japanese robonaut prepares to go where no robot...
Meet Mirata and Kirobo, a pair of Japanese robots who could help shape the future of space exploration. The robots stand 34 centimetres (17 inches) tall and weigh around one kilogram (2.2 pounds) each. Kirobo, whose name is derived from the Japanese word for hope, has the capacity to function in space. The robot astronaut is scheduled to travel onboard the Kounotori 4 cargo spacecraft due to launch from the Tanegashima Space Centre on August 4, on a mission to the International Space Station. Meanwhile, back-up crew member Mirata will be based on land. The robots are able to engage in converation and developers hope that they will one day be able to assist astronauts working in space. "The Russians were the first to go into space. The Americans were the first to land on the moon. I want Japan to be the first country to send a communication robot astronaut to space," said Yorichika Nishijima of Dentsu Inc, an advertising company collaborating on the project. Source: APTN Get the latest headlines http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ Subscribe to The Telegraph http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=telegraphtv Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/telegraph.co.uk Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/telegraph Follow us on Google+ https://plus.google.com/102891355072777008500/ Telegraph.co.uk and YouTube.com/TelegraphTV are websites of The Daily Telegraph, the UK's best-selling quality daily newspaper providing news and analysis on UK and world events, business, sport, lifestyle and culture.
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Japanese robonaut prepares to go where no robot has gone before: space
Meet Mirata and Kirobo, a pair of Japanese robots who could help shape the future of space exploration. The robots stand 34 centimetres (17 inches) tall and weigh around one kilogram (2.2 pounds) each. Kirobo, whose name is derived from the Japanese word for hope, has the capacity to function in space. The robot astronaut is scheduled to travel onboard the Kounotori 4 cargo spacecraft due to launch from the Tanegashima Space Centre on August 4, on a mission to the International Space Station. Meanwhile, back-up crew member Mirata will be based on land. The robots are able to engage in converation and developers hope that they will one day be able to assist astronauts working in space. "The Russians were the first to go into space. The Americans were the first to land on the moon. I want Japan to be the first country to send a communication robot astronaut to space," said Yorichika Nishijima of Dentsu Inc, an advertising company collaborating on the project. Source: APTN Get the latest headlines http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ Subscribe to The Telegraph http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=telegraphtv Like us on Facebook http://www.facebook.com/telegraph.co.uk Follow us on Twitter https://twitter.com/telegraph Follow us on Google+ https://plus.google.com/102891355072777008500/ Telegraph.co.uk and YouTube.com/TelegraphTV are websites of The Daily Telegraph, the UK's best-selling quality daily newspaper providing news and analysis on UK and world events, business, sport, lifestyle and culture.
Date: 6/26/13
Views: 1331
Video by:  YouTube
 
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