Silent Film Actress

Ethel Grandin

  • Mar 03, 1894 - Sep 28, 1988 (age 94)
  • 4' 11" (1.50 m)
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1988
Ethel Grandin
PersonalSeptember 1988

Ethel Grandin

Ethel Grandin passed away.
1922
A Tailor-Made Man
en.wikipedia.org
MovieAug 1, 1922

A Tailor-Made Man

John Paul Bart is mistaken for the arbitrator in a big steamship …
John Paul Bart is mistaken for the arbitrator in a big steamship labor case when in actuality he is a lowly pants presser. When the truth comes out, he proves that he is not merely an impostor but a young man of promise. He sets out to win legitimately the position he had held by mistake.
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1921
The Hunch
MovieNov 28, 1921

The Hunch

The Hunch released.
1916
The Crimson Stain Mystery
en.wikipedia.org
MovieAug 21, 1916

The Crimson Stain Mystery

In attempting to develop a …
In attempting to develop a chemical which would make a person super-intelligent, Dr. Montrose fails and the subjects of his experiments metamorphose into hideous monsters who band together and prey on humans. With the police stymied, a young detective attempts to track down the leader of the group of killers, known only to have a small crimson stain in one eye.
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1915
The Price of Ambition
MovieOct 25, 1915

The Price of Ambition

The Price of Ambition released.
The Mysterious Visitor
MovieSep 27, 1915

The Mysterious Visitor

The Mysterious Visitor released.
A Woman's Mistake
MovieSep 20, 1915

A Woman's Mistake

A Woman's Mistake released.
Her Secret
MovieSep 6, 1915

Her Secret

Her Secret released.
War at Home
MovieMay 26, 1915

War at Home

Ethel Mason and her husband, Ralph, find themselves in the …
Ethel Mason and her husband, Ralph, find themselves in the midst of domestic strife over Ethel's poodle "Cutey." After several unsuccessful attempts to get rid of the dog, Ralph takes it ...
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The Verdict
MovieMar 17, 1915

The Verdict

John Whitney, broker for Robert Courtleigh, is invited to dine …
John Whitney, broker for Robert Courtleigh, is invited to dine at the Courtleigh home. By a subterfuge he manages to secure an audience with Ethel. Courtleigh, knowing Whitney's reputation and careful of Ethel's happiness, deliberately interrupts the tête-à-tête just as Whitney is about to propose to Ethel. Courtleigh tells Whitney that as a man of business he admires him, not as a prospective son-in-law. Whitney leaves and plans to "get even" with Courtleigh. He purposely double-crosses Courtleigh in a stock deal and practically ruins him. Courtleigh goes to Whitney's office and begs Whitney to make amends. Whitney is willing if Courtleigh will withdraw his sentiment of the night previous. Courtleigh refuses and denounces Whitney. Mrs. Courtleigh tries to induce her daughter to marry Whitney. Ethel shows her mother an engagement ring that Dick Carrol has given her that afternoon while riding in the park. She is horrified at her mother's willingness to sacrifice her and after a stormy scene leaves. She finds her father in the library. Seeing his great distress. Ethel thinks that it is she who is selfish and offers to marry Whitney. Courtleigh refuses. Ethel shows her ring that Carrol has given her and Courtleigh shows pleasure. Mrs. Courtleigh, desperate at the thought of living in poverty, is determined to break the match between Ethel and Carrol. She instructs the butler to refuse Carrol admittance when he calls that night. Carrol calls and the door is shut in his face. Dumbfounded, he returns to his club where he phones Courtleigh, who promises to join him and explain matters. Ethel, alone in her room, decides upon a plan to save her father. She herself will go to Whitney and plead with him. She calls him up on the phone and tells him she is coming to his apartments. Whitney, dressed in evening clothes and about to leave, is overjoyed at the prospect of seeing her, dismisses his valet tor the evening and sits down with a bottle to await Ethel's coming. Courtleigh and Carrol meet at the club and Carrol is told of Whitney's treachery. Ethel arrives and Whitney welcomes her. He shows signs of drink; she pleads with him. Carrol leaves Courtleigh, telling him that he (Carrol) will try and settle with him and save Courtleigh's home. He arrives just at the time Whitney is embracing Ethel. Ethel is terrified at the prospect of being found in Whitney's room. The bell continues ringing and Carrol is shown in the hallway. Whitney points to his bedroom door. Ethel in her terror enters it and Whitney locks the door. Carrol is admitted and pleads with Whitney. Ethel hears her lover's voice. Whitney laughs at Carrol when Carrol, taking his check-book from his pocket, offers to pay Courtleigh's debt. Enraged by Whitney's offensive manner, Carrol slaps Whitney in the face with his gloves. Whitney leaps to a table and seizes a gun. Carrol, anticipating Whitney's move, closes with him before he can shoot and the struggle starts. Ethel pounds upon the door in frenzy but cannot make herself heard. The gun is discharged and Whitney falls in a chair at the side of the table, dead. The gun drops from his hand to the floor. Carrol exits. Ethel listens too terrified to cry out, then throws herself against the door in a vain endeavor to break it down. Courtleigh, at the club, is anxiously awaiting Carrol's return. Carrol is seen getting by the sleepy elevator boy. Back in Whitney's bedroom Ethel is at the window. She opens it, crawls out upon the ledge to the next window. She discovers Whitney dead. Courtleigh at the club is joined by Carrol, who tells him what has happened. Back in Whitney's apartment, Ethel is seen placing a pin in the table at Whitney's side. To the pin she attaches a string. She places the gun on the floor directly under Whitney's right hand. She again starts for the door with the string when she sees Carrol's cane on the table. She takes it with her. She takes the key from the door, throws the string over the transom, exits into the hall, locks the door from the outside, gets a settee, stands on it, takes the key, places it on the string and allows it to trail down to the table. It stops at the side of the dead man, the string is pulled and Ethel replaces the settee and exits. Both doors are locked, the gun is under the dead man's hand and the key on the table beside him. Ethel goes home. The valet returns, finds the door locked, looks through the transom and sees his master. The police come, discover the key and the gun and declare that it was a case of suicide. Carrol enters his apartment. His valet asks for his cane. Carrol realizes he has left it in Whitney's apartment and shows horror. Carrol has passed a sleepless night. He is pacing up and down in his room when his valet enters with the morning papers. He eagerly reads: "The verdict is suicide. The key of Whitney's apartment lay upon the table beside him and the door was locked. The gun was lying on the floor directly under the dead man's hand." Carrol is mystified. No mention of the cane. The valet enters and announces Ethel. Ethel enters, hiding the cane behind her. She slowly takes from behind her back and hands it to the utterly astounded Carrol. A short explanation and a clinch.
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His Doll Wife
MovieJan 11, 1915

His Doll Wife

His Doll Wife released.
The Burglar and the Mouse
MovieJan 4, 1915

The Burglar and the Mouse

The Burglar and the Mouse released.
1914
The Adopted Daughter
MovieDec 21, 1914

The Adopted Daughter

The Adopted Daughter released.
The Adventures of a Girl Reporter
www.imdb.com
MovieJun 29, 1914

The Adventures of a Girl Reporter

At the opening of the play it …
At the opening of the play it would appear that the famous Moore collection of jewels had been stolen from the home of the wealthy Moore family. Tom Wall, a reporter on the Clarion, is assigned to cover the story. He is refused an interview by Mr. Moore. His suspicions are aroused by Mrs. Moore's attitude and particularly so when he observes Carl Clement, a gentleman crook, entering the Moore home. He reports to his editor and suggests that Ethel, the society reporter, be assigned to the case and that she gain admission to the Moore house in the capacity of a maid. Ethel has little trouble in securing the position of maid, as one has been recently discharged. She soon discovers that Clement has Mrs. Moore under his influence, that she has lost enormous sums of money to him and to cover this up and keep Clement from informing her husband, she has turned over the jewels to him and pretended that they were stolen. Ethel telephones the facts to Tom. Her conversation is overheard by Clement who succeeds in drawing her from the house on a fake message and capturing her. With the aid of his gang he takes her to his rooms on the East Side, where he makes her a prisoner. Ethel, after clever maneuvering, manages to escape with the jewels in her possession. She informs the police, who raid the den, arrest the crooks, and apprehend Clement himself at the Moore home to which he has returned. It is Ethel who brings about the reconciliation of the Moores. She returns to her desk at the newspaper and gets out her "big story," And Tom, well, he is far from being jealous over her success for, as it is said, love is blind.
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Papa's Darling
MovieJun 22, 1914

Papa's Darling

The daughter of a Wall Street broker asks her father to give …
The daughter of a Wall Street broker asks her father to give her a trip to Europe. She is refused. She suggests to her father that he sign an agreement with her to the effect that if she can make enough money in three months to pay for the trip he will permit her to take it. He takes it as a joke, but signs. Ethel then endeavors to get a position, but finds that chances for work are all for the men. Finally, when almost in tears and entirely discouraged she decides to don man's attire. She deceives even her own father as to her sex and obtains work in his office where she falls in love with Billy, her father's general manager. She reads a telegram giving a "sure thing" tip on the market and gets Billy to invest her money. She wins. She goes into the private office to put the money in her stocking and is surprised by a mouse. Her sex, getting the better of her she screams, throwing her wig at the mouse. Billy enters, and is surprised and happy to find that she is a girl, having been unable to account for "his" peculiar attractiveness. Father gives her the trip to Europe as a honeymoon.
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The Dawn of the New Day
MovieMay 28, 1914

The Dawn of the New Day

Ethel, a poor country girl, …
Ethel, a poor country girl, marries John Smith, a wealthy farmer, so that she may secure support for her widowed mother. Sid Dunlap. a former sweetheart, upon returning from college, finds her married, and becoming annoyed at two of his companions who are continually kidding him about her marriage, he makes a wager with them that he can entice her away from her husband. He tells her of his love, and she, believing his protests of love honorable, and still loving him. she agrees to elope with him. She is discovered by her husband in Sid's arms, and he tells her to choose between them. She goes to Sid. Afterwards, discovering his dissolute character, she returns to her husband, who truly loves her. He takes her back and forgives all.
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Beneath the Mask
MovieMay 18, 1914

Beneath the Mask

Ethel is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dexter. The father …
Ethel is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dexter. The father was a wealthy factory owner. John Brady, foreman of the factory, takes a strong fancy to the girl and determines to win her by fair means or foul. However, his advances are more on the order of insults to Ethel. Brady, later, is discharged. Some time later, Ethel attends a mask ball, where she dances with an unknown man, William Barnes. It is a case of love at first sight. Brady also attends this ball and secures an opportunity to make unwelcome advances to the girl. Barnes avenges this by thrashing Brady. Brady leaves, determined to get even in some way; he visits the factory, robs the safe and sets fire to the place. Barnes, in the meantime, has been trying to coax Ethel to unmask. In the friendly struggle that Ethel loses her bracelet and Barnes pockets it. Dexter, Ethel's father, learns of the fire and realizes that he is completely ruined by it. Later he dies as a result of the shock. Ethel, forced to earn her own living, secures a position in the home of Barnes' sister, unaware of their relationship. She has refused again an offer of marriage from Brady. Barnes, continually thinking of Ethel decides to have a masked ball in his sister's home in the hope that he might again meet Ethel, whose name he has never learned. When the ball is given Ethel is in the house, but not as a guest. She notes Barnes' presence and his sad demeanor. She goes to her room and dons the dress she wore at the previous ball. During this time detectives concerned in the fire case have been slowly fastening evidence of guilt upon Brady. Brady has learned of Barnes' mask ball, and has presented himself and secured admission, though not a guest. It is during the height of pleasure that Brady is arrested. Barnes and Ethel unmask and the light in their eyes prophesies the culmination of romance in marriage.
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The Dawn of Romance
MovieMay 4, 1914

The Dawn of Romance

Doris Mason, a pretty sixteen-year-old girl whose mother is …
Doris Mason, a pretty sixteen-year-old girl whose mother is dead, develops into a terrible flirt, although a perfectly harmless and innocent one. She decides she is in love, and her father finding her somewhat difficult to manage, sends for her Aunt Becky. To break her wild nature, the aunt decides Doris must be sent to school. Stuart Howard, a young man, twenty, who lives near the Mason home, is in love with Doris. She has encouraged him since childhood, unwittingly. She cannot resist the temptation of flirting with other young men. Stuart is in a continual state of jealousy and always on the lookout to save her from committing herself too deeply. Even at the boarding-school she strikes up a flirtation with her music master, Signor Cheesi, and elopes with him from the school. She is caught and saved just in time by Stuart. A surprise is sprung at the end when Signor Cheesi's wife appears with her baby. Doris escapes back to college without being found out. This constitutes the first love adventure of Doris Mason, of which many more will follow.
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The Opal Ring
MovieMar 5, 1914

The Opal Ring

The opal ring belongs to the kindly old aunt. Her grand-niece …
The opal ring belongs to the kindly old aunt. Her grand-niece desired it, but the aunt refused it, vaguely believing in the old superstition that surrounded it. Perhaps it was a whim that caused the girl to place the securing of the opal ring as a test for her affection. Or perhaps she wished to prove conclusively the falsity of the superstition. Certainly she little dreamed of the tragic results that were to follow when she told the two young men, both in love with her, that the one who secured it from the old aunt could claim her. Alice in her heart believed the one she favored would secure it, for she knew that the old aunt favored him. The play starts out almost as a comedy. Then comes the forest shaft, in the shape of a letter from the aunt. The letter states that the opal ring was almost stolen. "I recognized the would-be robber, a worthless tenant of mine, and frightened him away!'" says the aunt. The two suitors, Fred and Will, decide to act at once before anything happens to the ring. That afternoon both visit the aunt and both are refused. Later, she writes a note to Fred, telling him to return that evening and that she will give him the ring. This note is seen by Will and he decides that there is only one way to get the ring and secure the heiress, whose money he particularly desires. That night Fred secures the ring. After his departure when the lights have been switched off, a real robber, his identity hidden in the darkness, enters and secures the jewel case. The aunt tries to interfere; there is a struggle and the aunt is killed. Before dying she whispers to the servant that "he came back again." Fred takes the ring to Alice. There, soon afterward, he is arrested as the thief. Will has an alibi to the fact that he was confined in his house at the time. Alice is overcome when told that the aunt is dead and imagines Fred guilty. Alice's father suspects Will, in spite of his alibi, and hires a detective. Then Alice enters the cause and tries to straighten out the mystery. She recalls the words of her aunt, "he came back again." Situation and complication pile up one on the other. Fred is tried and found guilty on circumstantial evidence, but through a clever bit of work by the girl the real thief is run down. It was the tenant, hired to do the work by Will. At the end Fred and Alice throw the ring into the flames. In his pocket Fred has something to take the place of it, a diamond ring which will bring love, happiness and good luck in its golden circlet.
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The Box Couch
MovieFeb 16, 1914

The Box Couch

The Box Couch released.
Jane Eyre
MovieFeb 9, 1914

Jane Eyre

Jane, left an orphan in the Reid family, is unhappy. Under the …
Jane, left an orphan in the Reid family, is unhappy. Under the harsh treatment of her foster parents the child grows delicate and the doctor orders her away. She is sent to the orphan home and there grows up to girlhood. Next we find her in Rochester's home, where she is governess to young Rochester's ward, Adale. Many times during the night she is disturbed by strange noises. Time goes on and she learns to love her young master. He. in turn, loves her and his proposal of marriage is accepted. It is the wedding eve before Jane comes face to face with the origin of the strange noises; it is a crazy woman. This woman is the wife of Rochester and has been held captive in the upper part of his home for years. The crazy wife attempts to burn Rochester to death. Jane saves him. Rochester confesses all, declaring that the woman she has seen was forced upon him by his parents. While Jane would forgive, she declares herself unable to stay longer in his household; that all is over between them. The night that Jane leaves, the mad wife again escapes from her room and again sets fire to the house. She rushes to the roof. Rochester attempts to save her. Jane, looking back, has seen the fire. Rushing up, she asks about her lover. The mad wife jumps from the roof and dies. Jane enters the burning house and manages to save Rochester. He is made blind. It is Jane's loving hands that guide him through life.
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1913
King the Detective in the Jarvis Case
www.imdb.com
MovieDec 29, 1913

King the Detective in the Jarvis Case

Caleb Jarvis, a mysterious …
Caleb Jarvis, a mysterious old grouch, has been jilted in his youth by a young girl. Since that time he has lived the life of a recluse in a small village, shunned and despised by everyone. One day as the postman comes to his house to deliver a letter he discovers the door open and getting no response to his repeated knocks, he enters and finds Caleb murdered, lying on a couch with the assassin's revolver near him. He immediately summons assistance, but Caleb is apparently past all help. The county prosecutor leaves two policemen to guard the body and seeks the help of King, a detective, to find out who committed the crime. When King arrives the body has mysteriously disappeared, although the watchers have not stirred from the room in which it lay. King orders them from the house and starts in his investigation. He discovers a picture on the wall of the lighthouse which has a peep-hole in it, and in attempting to make a closer investigation, accidentally touches a spring that releases a trap door in the lounge that he is standing on, and it precipitates him to an underground tunnel that leads to another room. King follows up this tunnel, which comes out of a fireplace in the next room, and finds that Jarvis has been in hiding there and has not been killed at all. Jarvis seeing that he is discovered, places a bomb in the tunnel with a short fuse, but finds, after he lights it, that King has nailed down the hearth and escape is impossible. The bomb explodes and kills Jarvis, but he lives long enough to confess the following remarkable story. One day as he was walking down the village street he met a girl who was the exact counterpart of the one who had jilted him years ago. He hurried to the city and found out through King the detective that this girl was the daughter of his former sweetheart, Nellie Saunders. On reaching home he planned that he would invite her to call on him a few minutes before it was time for the letter carrier to make his rounds and pretend that he had been murdered and so throw the blame of the crime on her. The prosecutor had advertised for a stenographer, and Nellie had come to the village in answer to it. It was a case of love at first sight with them and when King cleared the clouds from their path the inference leaves one to suppose that marriage bells will soon be chiming.
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Love vs. Law
MovieDec 1, 1913

Love vs. Law

Love vs. Law released.
Traffic in Souls
MovieNov 24, 1913

Traffic in Souls

A woman, with the aid of her police officer sweetheart, …
A woman, with the aid of her police officer sweetheart, endeavors to uncover the prostitution ring that has kidnapped her sister, and the philanthropist who secretly runs it.
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Borrowed Gold
MovieOct 31, 1913

Borrowed Gold

Jim Colby, a young miner, and his wife Ruth are living in the …
Jim Colby, a young miner, and his wife Ruth are living in the mountains near a small town in a mining district. Colby is injured by an explosion while working his claim. When he fails to return that night his wife becomes alarmed and, taking a lantern, rides over to the claim and finds Jim seriously injured. She manages to get him home and calls the doctor, who treats Jim for some time. When the bill becomes late the doctor refuses to go to Jim. Ruth becomes desperate and holds up the stage, disguised as a man. She is wounded in the arm. While bandaging her arm, she discards a duster, which she leaves behind her in her hurry to get away. The sheriff trails her to her cabin and she is surprised to find Jim, who the sheriff is sure has committed the robbery, a very sick man, and the girl busy counting the spoils. He grabs her by the arm, to find that she is wounded and that the wounded arm is the same as the bloody sleeve of the duster. Ruth confesses and tells the sheriff her story. She wins his sympathy and when his posse arrive at the cabin, he tells them that Jim was the man who did the job and that he is dead. The sheriff shows the posse the recovered money, and the picture closes with Ruth sobbing over the dead body of her husband.
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The Miser's Son
MovieSep 25, 1913

The Miser's Son

Henry, a man who loves gold above all else, has, by …
Henry, a man who loves gold above all else, has, by shrewd bargaining and miserly ways, accumulated enough money to pay a debt that one of the neighbors holds against him. This money he has secreted in the chimney of his parlor. While assisting his son one day to put hay in the barn a stone jug falls on his head, depriving him of his memory. His son has been forbidden to speak to the girl, he loves by the father who holds the note in question. The note falls due but the old man cannot recollect where he placed the money. Ethel, the girl, clandestinely calls on the boy and as they are seated in the parlor the tea kettle commences to boil over. Ethel, in trying to lift it from the stove, accidentally displaces a brick, revealing the hiding place of the money. The father's memory returns; he pays the note and consents to the union of the boy and girl.
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None But the Brave Deserve the --?
MovieSep 22, 1913

None But the Brave Deserve the --?

Reginald is a coward. Mary, …
Reginald is a coward. Mary, the wealthy young widow, adores bravery. Reginald takes Kitty, Mary's baby, out for a boat ride. Kitty falls overboard and but for Bob, the lifeguard, would have been drowned. Reginald bribes Bob and, taking the baby, claims that he saved it. He is acclaimed the hero and awarded a medal. Later he takes the mother for a boat ride and when the boat upsets, Bob again comes to the rescue. Reginald is discovered as a fraud and Bob is made the hero and taken to the garden party that evening. Here the assembled guests treat him rather coolly.
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The Gold Mesh Bag
MovieSep 8, 1913

The Gold Mesh Bag

Harry Manning is the son of a fashionable family, but on …
Harry Manning is the son of a fashionable family, but on account of money reverses he is compelled to earn his own living. Through the assistance of an old friend he obtains a position as floorwalker in a large department store. The employer, a very wealthy man, has a daughter, who falls in love with Harry, and pursues him, but he, from the serene height of his aristocratic lineage, looks askance at her. She hits on a fine idea. She obtains a photo of him and one of herself and has a double print made, showing them both on the same card. This wonderful scheme falls in its intent, and even makes him more distant than ever. Another wondrous scheme takes root in Ethel's mind, whereby she may be able to obtain her heart's desire. She conspires with two friends to impersonate two sneak thieves. They are to come to the store, steal from her a gold mesh bag in such a manner that Harry can see and capture them. This, she hopes, will bring him closer to her. This preposterous idea works out exactly opposite to her wishes. The pseudo thieves sneak the bag, but are seen by someone else. In order to make their getaway in the excitement, they pop the bag in the side pocket of the unsuspecting Harry. The bag is found in Harry's pocket; he is accused and is about to be arrested when Ethel breaks down and confesses that it was all a joke instituted by her. She is forgiven by her father, Harry is promoted, and, at a birthday party, given in her honor, Harry presents her another mesh bag containing an engagement ring. She joyously accepts and her father gives his consent.
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The Tale of a Fish
MovieSep 1, 1913

The Tale of a Fish

Ferdie and Bertie are persistent suitors for the hand of Ethel, …
Ferdie and Bertie are persistent suitors for the hand of Ethel, who loves Jack, who, absorbed in his books, pays but little attention to her. The other two suitors are loved by two charming girls, but ignore them. Ethel, not knowing which to select, offers her band as a prize for a fishing contest, the winner to marry her. Ferdie and Bertie are at once on the job, but are annoyed by their other sweethearts and catch no fish. Jack forgets about the contest until roused by Ethel and then falls asleep while angling. The other boys in despair then secretly buy each on enormous fish from a small village lad. Ethel, seeing the wonderful fish they have caught, and so that neither of the despised suitors may win her hand, secretly buys an enormous fish from the boy and attaches it to the hook of sleeping Jack and steals away. Bertie is at the hotel and as he displays the wonderful fish, he is the hero of the hour when Ferdie comes in with a still larger fish; in fact a young whale, and is about to claim Ethel's hand, when Jack dashes in with a fish of gigantic proportions and claims the girl, much to the amusement of small boy, who discreetly maintains silence.
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The Spell
MovieJun 27, 1913

The Spell

A young doctor makes a superficial study of hypnotic suggestion …
A young doctor makes a superficial study of hypnotic suggestion and discovers that he has powers in that direction. He practices upon his sweetheart and her friends. One day a traveling hypnotist comes to town and the girl, Ethel, decides to see what he can do. She and her acquaintances attend the séance and Ethel offers herself as a subject. She proves an amenable medium and her beauty appeals to the hypnotist, who neglects to release her from his influence and forces her to go away with him. On hearing of the disappearance, the distracted doctor hurries to the girl's home and gets a clue from a newspaper clipping. He follows several clues, and finally traces them to a town where he sees her in a store window in a trance. He endeavors to get through the crowd, but the hypnotist influences the police and he is ordered away. He appeals to headquarters and that night attends the performance with detectives. He creates a scene when he invades the platform, but the girl, under the spell, says she does not know him and he is turned away as an impostor. Baffled and heartbroken, but determined still, the doctor pulls himself together and calming down thinks the extraordinary situation out. He keeps in touch with the faker's movements, and remembering his own hypnotic powers, determines to put them to the test. With a friend he studies and practices and finds he has a wonderful will power. He travels to where the girl is on exhibition and taking a position in the audience, concentrates his mind upon the one thing. Gradually he finds the girl uneasy at some foreign influence, turning her eyes toward him. Their eyes meet and when she withdraws her own with a gasp, she knows something is wrong. The professor is unable to get her will bent to his own and gets more and more uneasy as she fails in simple tests. The audience commences to murmur and for once the man's self-possession fails him. He looks around for opposing influence and in time encounters the penetrating gaze of the doctor. He falters and is lost, for there is a will power stronger than his own facing him. Hysterically the man points to the doctor, telling the audience that he is the man who is ruining the performance and the people hold their breath as the doctor goes slowly to the platform and makes the wretch confess upon his knees. The police take charge of affairs, while the doctor gathers the rapidly recovering girl in his arms.
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The Toll of War
MovieMay 13, 1913

The Toll of War

Edith Eldridge, daughter of Colonel Eldridge, disguises herself as …
Edith Eldridge, daughter of Colonel Eldridge, disguises herself as a boy to enlist with her two brothers in the Confederate array. Her identity is discovered and she is rejected. Federal ...
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Pure Gold and Dross
MovieApr 13, 1913

Pure Gold and Dross

A young man possessed of moderate means, meets a …
A young man possessed of moderate means, meets a young actress. The infatuation is mutual and a hasty marriage is the result. The couple go to the West, where the man gets into the clutches of a mining shark, who takes his money in exchange for mining land which he firmly believes to be of no value. Following a year of hopeless endeavor and useless, unremitting toil, they are left penniless, and to add to their cares, a baby has arrived and must be provided for. A big-hearted man takes a fancy to the young husband and assists him. The husband shows his gratitude both to the man and to his daughter, and his attitude toward this girl is misunderstood by the suffering wife. The unwarranted and cruel gossip of the thoughtless villagers strengthens her suspicions, and her state of health, the death of her babe and poverty leave her despondent, and it only takes a letter of invitation from her former friends to decide her to go quietly away. She sells her engagement ring to pay for her passage and goes. The husband, on his way home, wanders by the river bank and discovers the gold he has been seeking for so long. He hurries on to tell his wife the glad news and finds her gone. He is heartbroken, and although the source of the gold is traced and he achieves wealth, it is all as nothing to him in the loss of his wife. He stands it as long as he can and decides to end it all. The wife, unable to bear the thought of him there in his loneliness, and longing for the freedom of the hills, returns in time to prevent a tragedy, and all is well.
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A House Divided
MovieApr 1, 1913

A House Divided

Virginia and Betty live in a southern mansion with their father. …
Virginia and Betty live in a southern mansion with their father. Young Tom, a neighbor, is in love with Virginia, although he is secretly worshiped by Betty. She watches the love making sadly. The war breaks out and the father and Tom ride away. Lieutenant Paul Brice is a Union spy and Mrs. Morris loves him and decides to become a spy herself. She carries letters to a clergyman, who introduces her to Virginia and Betty. The former is attracted, but Betty is suspicious and watches her closely. Mrs. Morris takes a fine house and furnishes it. Lieutenant Brice passes as her brother. Mrs. Morris invites Virginia and induces her to play cards. Virginia gives her I.O.U.'s, and is infatuated with the "brother." He falls in love with her. Mrs. Morris makes up her mind to punish Virginia when opportunity offers. Virginia happens to see the telegraph code and asks Brice what it is. He tells her it is a code for love letters and she takes it with her. Betty hears from her father that there are spies at work. She finds that her sister has taken a code telegram to the station for Brice and later discovers its meaning. She rides to get help for the Southern camp, which she knows is to be assaulted. This helps turn the tide of fortune and the Unionists are beaten back for the time being. Betty's father is badly wounded in the fight and Tom is slightly wounded too, and they, with the faithful Betty who thinks her sister a spy go home. Virginia snubs Tom and Betty tries to comfort him. The father holds a consultation of generals and aides in his bedroom. Mrs. Morris learns of this and gets Virginia to her home. She threatens her with exposure. Poor Virginia is afraid to go and confess to her sister and steals the plans. The theft is discovered. Betty, on the watch, sees Virginia hand over the papers. She gets her alone and accuses her, but they are interrupted by Brice and Mrs. Morris, who seizes Betty and locks her in a room. Having received the dispatches the Unionists decide to surround the Southern home and capture the Generals in council. Virginia, thoroughly frightened, confesses to Tom who starts out to the Southern camp for help. Virginia, climbing a pillar, frees Betty from her bonds and they descend by the pillar. The Southerners, under the guidance of Tom, meet the Unionists and defeat them and Mrs. Morris and Brice get away. Virginia confesses that she does not love Tom in the right way, and goes, leaving the field clear for the union of Tom and Betty.
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The Coward's Atonement
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MovieFeb 26, 1913

The Coward's Atonement

William Carter and Harry …
William Carter and Harry Collier are great friends and both love the bright little Irene. She likes Will, but not enough to accept him. She becomes engaged to Harry. War breaks out between the North and South. Harry enlists joyfully, but Will only joins the Confederate army under compulsion. Colonel Dickinson does not believe in secession and joins the Union army. He is put in charge of a regiment to fight the Southerners. Irene weeps when the boys march away. Very early in the war Harry shows his metal in saving an ammunition wagon on a burning bridge in the face of a Unionist fire. He is promoted to the rank of lieutenant. Will feels the pangs of jealousy, but overcomes them and congratulates his friend. General Robert E. Lee sends a dispatch ordering a detachment to be sent under a picked man to defend the Georgia and Southern Railroad from the destroying Unionists, and Harry is assigned to the dangerous mission. In his company is Will. The Unionists, under Dickinson, blow up part of the road, but are routed by the charge of the Confederates under the intrepid Harry. During the sharp fight Will sees two men fall, one on either side of him. He is wounded in the arm and in a panic of terror he rides away. He goes to the home of Irene. She, not knowing who the marauder is, nearly shoots him for cowardice. He determines to retrieve himself as she bathes and binds his painful wound. Colonel Dickinson arrives with his troops. Irene pushes Will into her bedroom. She permits the orderlies to search the house, but appeals to Colonel Dickinson when they go to her bedroom door. The colonel allows the room to go unsearched. Colonel Dickinson, in a room adjoining the one in which Will is concealed, writes a dispatch telling General Grant where to send reinforcements, to Stony Fork Bridge. Will hears the import of the message and determines to secure the dispatch. He writes a false dispatch, stating that the "Union reinforcements for Dickinson will arrive at Stony Fork Bridge tomorrow." This he puts into his breast pocket. Will gets out through the window and runs to the barn, where the horses are quartered, whilst Irene delays Colonel Dickinson by giving him some light refreshment. The scout entrusted with the dispatch goes to the barn to get his horse. Will strikes him down with a whiffletree. Another guard hears the noise, runs to the barn door and is shot by Will, who has just time to hide the real dispatch in the bandages on his arm, when he is overpowered and taken before Colonel Dickinson. He is searched, and the false dispatch found in his breast pocket. Dickinson believes it to be his original dispatch, sends it off by another scout. He orders Will to be confined, but permits Irene to bathe and re-bandage his wounded arm. In this way Irene is able to obtain the original dispatch. She runs to the barn, and seeing the dead scout, makes an old darkey strip the body of his clothes, and donning them herself, she mounts and gets to the Confederate lines, where she is recognized by Harry. Will, confined in the smokehouse at Irene's home, sees her go and feels more satisfied with himself, but determines to escape in order to thoroughly retrieve himself in the eyes of Irene, his cowardice, and for his own salvation. The battle of Stony Fork Bridge starts and progresses. Breastworks are stormed and the battle sways back and forth. Dickinson orders his artillery to shell the town. A shell bursts through the smokehouse and Will escapes through the opening made thereby. The advance contingent of the Confederates is thrown back, and Harry, with reserves, comes to the rescue with one of his old-time charges. Will arrives breathless, unseen, and mad with the lust of battle. As he reaches the breastworks, the Confederate flag-bearer is shot. Will seizes the flag, and as he leaps over he is shot and falls, mortally wounded, by the side of Colonel Dickinson, who is dying. The two opponents in the war shake hands and succor each other in the throes of death. Will sinks back "and for all the evil in his life he did, his death atoned." Harry adds to his spurs, and he and Irene find their old comrade with his beloved flag wrapped around him and a smile of contentment on his lips.
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When Lincoln Paid
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MovieJan 31, 1913

When Lincoln Paid

Abraham Lincoln is shown in his youth addressing an …
Abraham Lincoln is shown in his youth addressing an audience of village people on the street corner. A terrific thunder storm comes up, driving his auditors away, and Lincoln mounts his horse and rides away. The storm increases in fury, and Lincoln is compelled to seek shelter at a farm house, owned by a widow, Mrs. Barnes, who has a son about ten years of age, named Harry. Mrs. Barnes prepares a hearty meal for Lincoln, who dries himself at the hearth, and when the storm has ceased wishes to pay Mrs. Barnes for the meal. Knowing his poverty, she refuses to accept anything, and Lincoln gravely gives her an I.O.U., reading: "I.O.U. the price of one good meal. Also my life, as I might have lost it in the storm. Abe Lincoln, Lawyer." Ten years later the Civil War breaks out, and Harry Barnes enlists. During the course of the war the Union soldiers take up headquarters with a Southern family, and Harry meets Betty and falls in love with her, and secures her promise to marry him after the war is over. As the Union soldiers move on they are caught in an ambush, and Harry's horse is shot from under him. He leans into the thicket and in a running fight with his pursuers manages to elude them and takes refuge at Betty's home. Betty is fearful that Harry will be captured, and provides him with a suit of civilian's clothes, and that night he endeavors to steal back to his regiment. He is captured, however, and according to military rules is held as a spy, being caught within the enemy's lines without his uniform. Harry sends a letter to his mother telling her of the facts, and she makes an impassioned plea to General Porter, the Southern soldier, for the life of her son, but to no avail. Harry is shot, and a pathetic and dramatic scene takes place as the mother fondles the lifeless body of her boy and calls for vengeance upon the heads of those responsible for his death. A month later General Porter lays plans to crush the North, and sends his son Bob to General Lee with plans of the Union fortifications. Bob has a narrow escape from capture, and in his flight comes upon the home of Mrs. Barnes. With her heart heavy with grief over the death of her son, her sympathy goes out to this hunted youth, and she hides him in the room formerly occupied by Harry. Bob has thrown his coat down, and the letter to Lee drops out. Mrs. Barnes reads it, and in a flash she plans a terrible revenge on General Porter. While Bob is sleeping in thorough exhaustion after his nights of peril, she hides his clothing and substitutes the uniform of her son, and when the Union soldiers come hunting for Bob she helps in his capture and accuses him of being a spy, turning over to the Union officer the letter to Lee and telling him that Bob came there posing as a Northern officer. Bob is arrested and held for trial as a spy. The failure of Bob to deliver the letter leads to a terrific battle, in which the Confederates are driven back. Mrs. Barns, in calm contemplation of her work, realizes what an injustice she has done, and filled with remorse has terrible visions which nearly drive her mad. She finally resolves to appeal to Lincoln, and hurries to him. Her plea is overruled by the cabinet, but when Mrs. Barnes lays Lincoln's old I.O.U. in his hand and demands payment of his obligation, he is persuaded to sign the pardon which is rushed by fleet messengers to save the life of the Southern boy.
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A Bluegrass Romance
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MovieJan 15, 1913

A Bluegrass Romance

Judge Breckenridge and his wife, his daughter, Alma, and his …
Judge Breckenridge and his wife, his daughter, Alma, and his son, Robert, are living together in 1861. Robert is expelled from a military academy on account of his intemperance, and comes home. The judge is very angry. Robert's habits do not improve, as he falls in with bad companions. The war breaks out and the town grows mad, waving flags and marching around. Recruits are called for, and Judge Breckenridge is elected an officer. Robert attempts to enlist, but his application is refused, as he is slightly inebriated at the time. Sullen and angry, Robert goes to a saloon, where he meets Lieut. Burr, a Federal secret service man, in disguise. Burr makes himself agreeable and the two become friends. Late at night Robert goes home and endeavors to sneak into the house. The judge awakens and, finding Robert in an intoxicated condition, again orders him away and disowns him. The next day Burr meets Robert and persuades him to accept a commission in the government secret service, and following the plan outlined, Robert goes to another Confederate post and enlists. Scenes of battle are shown, with thrilling encounters between the two armies. Robert manages to keep in communication with Burr, and it is arranged to lure the Confederates into an ambush. Robert receives a letter from his mother, as follows: "My Dear Son, Was so thankful to hear from you. Your father joined the Fifth Virginia and is somewhere in your locality. He will be proud when he knows that you are fighting for the cause. God guard you and bring you safely back to me. With greatest love. Mother." The darkies are singing "My Old Kentucky Home," and as the strains of the music from the banjos come to his ears Robert's thoughts are wafted back to his home. In a tremendous conflict of emotions he has a revulsion of feeling and decides not to betray the South. Accordingly he sends a false dispatch to Burr, telling him that the rebels will attack Benton Bridge that night, but to disregard it, as it is a ruse to distract attention from the enemy's left, which they intend to storm in full force. Burr therefore protects the left wing of the Union army, and the Confederates attack in full force, sweeping away the right wing and falling on the left and defeating it. During the thrilling battle Robert is wounded, and in undressing him the messages from Burr are found. He is arrested as a spy, and a dramatic scene takes place as his father, in charge of the court martial, finds that he is to judge his own son. Robert is convicted and sentenced to be shot, meeting his death without fear. The war ends. Some years afterward Judge Breckenridge and his wife are seen in their home. While reading the paper the judge comes to the following item: "Supposed Southern Traitor Really a Hero." "A remarkable instance of wartime has just come to light through a statement made by Lieut. Burr, U.S.A. Secret Service, during the war. It seems that Robert Breckenridge, the son of Judge Breckenridge of Blairsville, Ky., was not the traitor he has been pictured, but was really a Southern hero, as it was through his loyalty and strategy that the South won the battle of Blairsville."
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Arthur Smallwood
Child1913

Arthur Smallwood

Arthur Smallwood born.
1912
The Invaders
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MovieNov 29, 1912

The Invaders

The U.S. Army and the Indians sign a peace treaty. However, a …
The U.S. Army and the Indians sign a peace treaty. However, a group of surveyors trespass on the Indians' land and violate the treaty. The army refuses to listen to the Indians' complaints, and the surveyors are killed by the Indians. A vicious Indian war ensues, culminating in an Indian attack on an army fort.
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His Double Life
MovieJul 23, 1912

His Double Life

His Double Life released.
His Message
MovieJun 25, 1912

His Message

Holmes and his daughter, Nell, live in a cabin, while he works his …
Holmes and his daughter, Nell, live in a cabin, while he works his claim. Haven, a young prospector, has pitched his tent in the vicinity and the three become friends. Haven is fortunate in his quest for gold, and the pile of yellow metal accumulates until he has a goodly fortune in his possession. The mining operations have been secretly watched by a trio of desperadoes, who await a favorable opportunity to steal it. One day Haven is severely wounded by a landslide, and his cries bring Holmes and Nell to his assistance. The girl nurses him at her home and completely wins his heart. A week passes and Haven is about on crutches. Holmes goes to the settlement for supplies and the thieves seize this opportunity to carry out their scheme. As they are forcing an entrance, Nell escapes through a back window and makes a desperate ride to the settlement for help. With the gold, Haven, by means of a table and a chair, reaches the attic. He then knocks a hole in the roof, and crippled as he is, slides to the ground. The thieves pursue him and mortally wound him. He continues his flight to the edge of the river where he falls dying on a rock, throwing the gold into the water. The thieves come up and not finding the gold turn back. Haven, feeling himself passing away, laboriously writes a message on the rock with his own blood: "The gold is in the water." Accompanied by a score of men from the settlement, Nell is hurrying back at break-neck speed. The thieves are captured and Haven's body is found, and the gold recovered.
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The Lieutenant's Last Fight
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MovieJun 1, 1912

The Lieutenant's Last Fight

The story opens with an …
The story opens with an Indian village, the home of Big Bear, the son of the Sioux chief. The government agent, impressed with the brightness of the lad, persuades his father to permit him to be sent to a military school. The cadets, perfectly disciplined, are shown in their trim uniforms, drilling on the parade grounds and the young savage is introduced into their midst. Ten years serve to convert the slender boy into a stalwart man, who graduates with the rank of lieutenant, and is assigned to Fort Reno. He arrives in a stagecoach and reports for duty to Col. Garvin. The officers and their families are at dinner when the colonel introduces the new officer. Lieutenant Big Bear is made to keenly feel barrier of race, as his pleasant acknowledgment of the introduction is met with coolness. Soft-hearted Ethel, the colonel's daughter, noting the man's mental anguish, impulsively comes forward and gives the lieutenant her hand, with a gracious word of welcome. The old Indian chief is advised of his son's coming, and attired in all the glory of paint and feathers, so dear to the Indian heart, visits Big Bear. An affecting scene takes place as the father and son meet again, and the old chief fondly caresses the gold trappings of his son's uniform, and proudly admires the shining brass buttons. The actions of the chief are the source of much amusement to the other officers and the women of the post, who watch the pair from a window and mimic the actions of the chief. Indignant at their narrowness, Ethel runs out and asks Big Bear for an introduction to his father. Capt. Haines has been an ardent wooer of Ethel, and he resents the friendly interest she has taken in the Indian. He is infuriated when he sees Big Bear in pleasant conversation with the girl while the lieutenant is waiting to speak to the colonel at his quarters. Haines waits for Big Bear and warns him from speaking to Ethel. The Indian resents the insult, the men engage in a terrific struggle. Haines is being badly thrashed by the powerful Indian when he draws the revolver from Big Bear's holster and attempts to shoot him. The weapon is knocked from his hand, but the shot attracts other officers who pull the contestants apart. Haines dramatically accuses Big Bear of having attempted to kill him, and points to the Indian's revolver with one cartridge exploded. Big Bear is court-martialed and found guilty of assaulting a brother officer, and is ordered publicly disgraced and dismissed from the service. The ceremony is most impressive, as the shoulder straps and side arms of the lieutenant are torn from him, in the presence of the whole regiment. Big Bear packs his belongings into his trunk, including his saber and uniform, and departs. With tears in her eyes and quivering lips, Ethel alone bids the lieutenant good-bye, and as he clasps the hand of the girl and sees the sympathy and friendship in her face, his whole heart goes out to her. With the taciturnity of his race, however, he does not betray his feelings, and with a hand clasp he bids her adieu forever. Big Bear is given a warm welcome by the tribe, and his father and mother. His civilian's attire is noted, and when the Indians hear the story of his disgrace they are filled with rage. The government has been negotiating with the Indians for their lands, and, a few days later, at a meeting with the colonel at the fort, the old chief denounces the pale-faces and their methods, and threatens trouble. After his departure, the colonel, knowing that a terrible Indian war is inevitable, sends a courier to Ft. Custer, apprising the commander of the situation, and telling him that the women of Ft. Reno would be sent to Ft. Custer via stage coach, under escort, for safety. The courier is shot from his horse by the Indians, who find the letter but are unable to read it. Big Bear has been persuaded by his father to don the war paint, and to join in the fight against the whites, when the letter is brought into camp. He interprets the message and the old chief immediately determines to massacre the escort and capture the women. Instantly Big Bear realizes the terrible danger Ethel is placed in, and, alone in his tent, he racks his brain for a scheme to save her. A vision of her soft eyes looking tenderly at him as she bade him good-bye comes to him, and he resolves to sacrifice his life, if need be, to save her from harm. At the fort the women are placed in the coach, and, accompanied by a picked detail, start on the journey to Ft. Custer, a larger and safer structure. As the Indians leave the camp to ambush the soldiers, Big Bear, by a ruse, stays behind, and rushing into his tent, tears the Indian feathers from his head and dons his lieutenant's uniform. Buckling his saber about him, he examines his heavy army pistols, and, leaping on a horse, starts out on his hopeless mission. As the stage coach reaches a valley, the surrounding bushes and trees become suddenly alive with Indians, and a volley marks a trail of death among the soldiers. Lashing their horses, the troopers endeavor to escape, and a running fight ensues. Behind a hill the last stand is made, and huddled together the little band fight for their lives. Galloping along, Big Bear comes upon the body of the company bugler, and picking up his instrument, makes his way to the crest of the hill. From this advantageous position, hidden by the bushes, he deliberately picks off the redskins as they approach close to the stagecoach, Coolly and calmly he makes every bullet tell. Amid the terrible excitement and thunder of riflery, the crack of his guns is not noticed. With the clothes practically shot from his back and hanging in shreds, a trooper suddenly darts through the line of Indians, down the hillside, and plunging into the river at terrific speed the horse turns a somersault. The wounded rider clings to the saddle and the noble animal gallops to the fort. A word, and the bugle call rings out and the brigade is mounted and hastening to the scene of battle. Meantime the little band is in a desperate predicament. Big Bear has seen the escape of the soldier, and knowing that every second is golden, he puts the bugle to his lips and the musical blasts of "The Charge" cause consternation among the Indians, who think the soldiers are at hand and hurriedly retreat. They soon discover their mistake, however, and return to the attack with redoubled fury. The few minutes' respite, however, have saved the doomed people. Creeping up from the foot of the hill an Indian works his way to the back of Big Bear. Taking deliberate aim he sends a bullet crashing into his body. Mortally wounded, the lieutenant leaps upon the Indian, but is soon dispatched. As the troops arrive and charge into the ranks of the Indians a thrilling scene is enacted, but the redskins are broken up and scattered, and ignominiously run for their lives, pursued by the relentless soldiers. The last scene shows the still form of the lieutenant in the twilight, the man who was despised by the white people with whom he had cast his lot, and who met his death at the hands of his own race, "unwept, unhonored and unsung," his heroism unknown even to the girl for whom he gave his life. They met. A far something in the soul of the girl responded to an indefinite something in his. And the greatest blessing and the greatest bane of earth melded with and became her being, a heedless, headless love. Then he tired of the jesting imitation, of the eternal squalor and the dreary denial, and longed for the convenient comforts and luxuries of his other life. He told them he was going to work elsewhere, and the girl's heart filled with an instinctive but indistinct fear and foreboding, interpreted by a great, glistening tear. Type was never so cold and bold and cruel as that which told her, a few weeks later, of his marriage to millions. A great sob arose from the desert of her soul to mock the lying promises of man, and her heart bowed to a sorrow as solemn as midnight, as profound as death.
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Blazing the Trail
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MovieApr 15, 1912

Blazing the Trail

Showing the trail of civilization across the western country, …
Showing the trail of civilization across the western country, the emigrant train, the Cooper family, the treachery of the Indians, the capture of Helen Cooper and the daring attempt to rescue her, resulting in his capture and being made to run the gauntlet and forced to undergo torture by the squaws. Thrilling rescue of the prisoners from the Indian camp, sensational battle, as the emigrants swoop down on the redskins, wonderful acting by star artists in the leading parts, massive and colossal cast, amazing in grandeur and magnificence, stages in scenes of wild and wondrous beauty.
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The Deserter
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MovieMar 15, 1912

The Deserter

A deserting soldier encounters a wagon train of settlers. When …
A deserting soldier encounters a wagon train of settlers. When they are faced with an Indian attack, he risks court martial to return to the Army post for help.
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War on the Plains
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MovieFeb 23, 1912

War on the Plains

The emigrants are seen fighting the hordes of redskins. The hero …
The emigrants are seen fighting the hordes of redskins. The hero rides to the settlement for help and engages in a thrilling duel with pursuing Indians. The settlers swoop down on the unprotected Indian village and burn it up. The savages seeing the flames, hurry back and fall into an ambush. They are attacked from the rear by the emigrants and from the front by the settlers. In a wild scene of carnage the surprised Indians are mowed down by the hail of bullets, horses and riders falling in tangled masses.
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Ray C. Smallwood
Marriage1912

Ray C. Smallwood

Ray C. Smallwood was born on July 19, 1887 in New York …
Ray C. Smallwood was born on July 19, 1887 in New York City, New York, USA. He is known for his work on My Old Kentucky Home (1922), Camille (1921) and The Best of Luck (1920). He was married to Ethel Grandin. He died on February 23, 1964 in Hollywood, California, USA.
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1911
Bar Z's New Cook
MovieDec 12, 1911

Bar Z's New Cook

The dainty cook makes quite a hit with the boys. It develops, …
The dainty cook makes quite a hit with the boys. It develops, however, that she only took the job after a quarrel with her husband, and there are many sore hearts after hubby takes her away. Incidentally, her cooking causes many new patients for the doctor.
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Uncle's Visit
MovieNov 27, 1911

Uncle's Visit

Mr. and Mrs. Sperry, newlyweds, are expecting a visit from Mr. …
Mr. and Mrs. Sperry, newlyweds, are expecting a visit from Mr. Sperry's uncle, a wealthy cattle raiser, from Kansas. He has never met the wife and she is anxious to make a good impression. She receives a letter from another relative, warning her that, inasmuch as the man from the cyclone country is quite eccentric, he may come disguised to test her qualities. She remembers the admonition and when "Slimmy," a typical nomad, puts in an appearance, he is royally received. The knight of the road is agreeably surprised. He thoroughly enjoys the situation of being guessed out as the expected relative. He is wined and dined like a prince, and tops it off with a fragrant cigar, finishing up by appropriating the contents of the box. In the meantime, Uncle Silas arrives and calls at the office of the husband, where he is given a royal greeting. Business is dropped and the nephew proudly escorts the man from the west down the street, having in prospect a happy surprise for his wife. They enter the hall and the fumes of a cigar greet their nostrils. The uncle is shocked and inquires sternly if the wife is addicted to the use of tobacco. They go into the room and find "Slim" enjoying all the comforts of a privileged guest. There is consternation. The husband fires out the tramp and the perplexed wife tries to explain, but the irate husband will not listen. The uncle is also exasperated and announces his intention of boarding the next train for Kansas. Finally the wife shows the letter and it all dawns on the husband. There is an explanation to the uncle and a happy reconciliation between Mr. and Mrs. Sperry. The story closes with the tramp inhaling the fragrance of a choice cigar, his hunger appeased, about to take passage up the road on the bumpers of a freight car.
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Executive Clemency
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MovieNov 23, 1911

Executive Clemency

Dan Fuller, an honest mechanic, is the victim of circumstances. …
Dan Fuller, an honest mechanic, is the victim of circumstances. He is ill one day and the rent collector, who is an unprincipled masher, with insinuating manners, calls and grossly insults his wife, attacking her in a familiar manner. Dan is aroused and rushing into the room administers a beating to the rascal which results in a serious injury. Fuller is arrested and, having no friends, is convicted on a charge of felonious assault, the mitigating circumstances not being considered. He is serving a sentence in the penitentiary when he receives a letter informing him he is the father of a child. Obsessed by the injustice of his incarceration and insane with a desire to see his wife and child, he eludes the guards and makes his escape from prison, exchanging garments with a scarecrow. He visits his home to find his aged mother at the bedside of the young wife. Without awakening his wife he kisses her and the baby and returns to prison and voluntarily gives himself up. The facts connected with his conviction have reached the governor, who has decided to pardon him on Thanksgiving Day. When it is reported he has escaped the official reconsiders his intention and Fuller is destined to serve his full sentence. The daughter of the governor reads in a newspaper that Fuller escaped to visit his wife and baby and then returned to prison of his own volition and the incident touches her heart. She implores her father to be merciful and he relents. Fuller is released from prison on Thanksgiving Day. He returns home to find a bountiful Thanksgiving dinner provided by the daughter of the governor and the corned beef and cabbage his mother has prepared for the occasion is laid aside. The coming of the husband is unexpected by the wife and there is a happy reunion witnessed by the daughter of the chief executive, who looks on approvingly.
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A Biting Business
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MovieOct 23, 1911

A Biting Business

Felix Hardin is a hard-working old man employed as a …
Felix Hardin is a hard-working old man employed as a bookkeeper in a large concern. He has a large family and is wrapped up in his wife and children. He longs to take them out of the heat of the city to enjoy the balmy air of the country. The occasion presents itself. Clifton, a dealer in real estate, visits the office where he is working and calls his attention to a glowing advertisement, offering bungalow lots very cheap. Hardin is not a business man and is very gullible. He looks at the plan of the lots and is infatuated with the ideas of owning one. The payments are easy and he is persuaded to part with the contents of his pay envelope as a first installment. He returns home and gleefully explains the deal to his wife. She does not share in his enthusiasm, as there are bills to meet, and she had counted on his weekly salary to pay them. She is mollified, however, when she sees the glowing press matter and the plat of the lot. When summer comes Hardin has a vacation and he packs his family off to the shore to feast their eyes on the lot. He finds it with some difficulty and learns that he has been the victim of a cruel swindle, the lot being situated in a mosquito-infested swamp, in an isolated spot. All the members of the family give vent to their feelings in tears. Hardin crumples up the deed for the lot and casts it into the bog and the family walk away downhearted. Montgomery, a wealthy real estate dealer, has built a bungalow near the site of Hardin's lot, and comes down with his wife for the summer. The mosquitoes make life miserable for them and he investigates. In order to rid himself of the pests Montgomery is informed the swamp must be drained and filled and he decides to purchase the property and stop the breeding of the insects. Clifton calls upon him and they walk out to inspect the swamp. Hardin overhears the conversation and then steals away and fishes out the deed to his lot. He is approached by the sharks and holds out for an exorbitant sum for his purchase and gets it to his joy. A case of the biter being stung good and hard.
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The Aggressor
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MovieOct 19, 1911

The Aggressor

Hank Denby, a miner, has a loving little wife, but he is a brute …
Hank Denby, a miner, has a loving little wife, but he is a brute and abuses her. She bears it patiently until one day when forbearance ceases to be a virtue. He goes out to his work after an unusually violent scene, in which his wife is in tears as a consequence. She is all alone on the mountain, but resolves to desert her husband, to go, anywhere to rid herself of the obnoxious presence of the husband. She packs a few of her belongings, writes a note to Denby, and is about to go out into the world when Philip Baldwin, a prospector much older than she, comes into the cabin in search of food and drink. He is welcomed by the woman as he is kind. He looks about the cabin and notes her preparation for flight in surprise. On being questioned, the girl wife tells him of the ill treatment she has been subjected to and her decision to leave it all. He mildly tries to dissuade her, to no avail. She is determined to leave and asks to be allowed to travel in his company. The big rough fellow sees no impropriety in that and the woman is guiltless of any wrong-doing. They leave the cabin, arrive at the tent of Baldwin and in attempting to secure water for her, he falls over a cliff. She runs around the eminence and finds him in the meantime, the husband has returned home, read the note, takes the trail and follows the pair with the insane idea that some man has stolen the affections of his wife. He comes upon them just as his wife is trying to extricate Baldwin from his perilous position. He is about to kill him when the wife interferes. Denby takes Baldwin on his back and carries him, unconscious to his cabin, where he nurses him back to health. On being convalescent, Baldwin leaves, but is followed by Denby to a rocky peak. Slapping Baldwin's face, he challenges him to a revolver duel. Baldwin is loath to fight, but is provoked, and back to back they start to walk apart. At the signal they turn and fire. Denby falls dead. His wife comes out and falls prostrate across his body. Baldwin gazes at the woman for a time and then, not understanding, walks away, down the slope, leaving Mrs. Denby alone with her dead husband whom she had not loved in life.
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By the House That Jack Built
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MovieSep 11, 1911

By the House That Jack Built

A wicked queen casts a spell …
A wicked queen casts a spell over a prince and steals his heart.
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Behind the Times
www.imdb.com
MovieAug 17, 1911

Behind the Times

For many years Rev. David Ellis has been pastor of the …
For many years Rev. David Ellis has been pastor of the congregation of a village church. He has been loved by his flock and has seen it grow from a small number to a flourishing pastorate. The aged preacher has not kept pace with the times and the fact is noted by the members of one of the women's societies. The president, a society woman, has her ideas and decides that the old teacher should be replaced by a younger minister. It is decided to retire the old pastor on a pension and install his successor. Rev. Charles Montgomery arrives and the news is broken to Dominie Ellis at his home. The new minister is young, and a favorite with the women. His first sermon is listened to with interest and at the close he is congratulated. The old pastor is there and he wends his way out with his faithful wife. Reverend Ellis has one stanch friend, a sweet young girl of the village, and her mother becomes ill. The daughter meets the Reverend Mr. Montgomery as he is about to go motoring and implores him to go to her home. He has no time for calling on his parishioners. The girl goes to the old minister and tells him of the illness of her mother. Stopping to pluck a flower, he goes with her and sits by the bedside of the mother. His coming is a surprise to the woman of fashion, but he takes matters in hand, kneels by the bedside of the child and prays, long and earnestly. His supplication is heard, the child revives, much stronger. The mother starts to thank him and he moves away. The next Sunday the Reverend David Ellis occupies the pulpit and at the close of the sermon he is surrounded by the congregation and warmly congratulated.
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Dorothy's Family
MovieAug 10, 1911

Dorothy's Family

Dorothy is a level-headed young woman, practical in love …
Dorothy is a level-headed young woman, practical in love affairs as well as everything else. She has two admirers, both bent on marrying her, but she is unable to choose between them, as they are both handsome, debonair, rich and in every way eligible. They pay assiduous court to her and it resolves itself into a choice. Dorothy is in a quandary as to which is the more worthy, but finally hits upon a scheme to test them out. She invites in the dirty, ill-clad children of the neighborhood and introduces them to the first caller. He gives one look and beats a hasty retreat. The other admirer, looking through the window, takes in the situation and on being presented to the motley crowd, makes himself agreeable in every way, much to the satisfaction of the girl, who thinks she has discovered his true worth and loves her for herself alone. Her mind is not disabused and she is won on the spot.
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1894
Ethel Grandin
BirthMarch 1894

Ethel Grandin

Ethel Grandin was born.
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