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Florence Barker

  • Nov 22, 1891 - Feb 15, 1913 (age 21)
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1913
Florence Barker
PersonalFebruary 1913

Florence Barker

Florence Barker passed away.
1912
The Petticoat Detective
MovieDec 11, 1912

The Petticoat Detective

Harold reads in a newspaper …
Harold reads in a newspaper that his fiancée Dolly, has been attacked by a bad man who is holding up women in the isolated parts of the city. He calls on her and announces that he will investigate the matter. He leaves in a pompous manner and the Rev. Hollister Crimshaw meets Dolly and the attraction is mutual. The minister decides to masquerade in the role of an amateur detective and distinguishes himself as the capturer of the bad man. Harold disguises in feminine garments and sallies forth to effect the capture of the man feared by the women. Dolly being a strong-minded young woman, arms herself with a formidable hatpin and goes out to wreak vengeance on the purse snatcher. Dolly meets up with Spike and he attacks her only to get worsted in the encounter with his hide punctured by the hatpin. In the meantime Harold has trailed the minister, whom he suspects of being the man sought. The minister penetrates his disguise sufficiently to see that Harold is a man masquerading in feminine apparel and he suddenly attacks Harold and they go to the pavement in their struggles. In the meantime Dolly has Spike down, sitting on him, yelling for help. Harold and the minister struggle towards her and Dolly and the minister recognize each other. The minister announces he has caught the bad man while Dolly contends the honors of the capture belong to her. Harold tries to explain, but the minister will not listen. In the mix-up Spike make good his escape and Harold is escorted to the police station by Dolly and the minister. Once there, Harold is shown up in a sorry plight and the Rev. Hollister Grimshaw walks away with Dolly in triumph while Harold is kicked out of the police station.
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A Dreamland Tragedy
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MovieNov 1, 1912

A Dreamland Tragedy

A family quarrel and the sight of a large roll of money, the pay …
A family quarrel and the sight of a large roll of money, the pay roll, so influences the mind of the laborer's daughter that she dreams of terrible things happening to her father, brother and sweetheart, the paymaster. In dreamland she sees her father drug her sweetheart's liquor and taking him home, proceeds to rob him of the pay roll. Coming upon them unawares, the girl manages to get the father out of the way, then summoning all her strength literally carries the young paymaster out of the house. In the meantime, her brother, a shiftless character, returns home and resolving to take things easy, falls asleep on the bed where the old man had placed the paymaster. On returning from his errand, the father sees that the coast is clear, steals to the bed, still intent upon securing the pay roll and unaware of the fact that the figure on the bed is his own son instead of the intended victim. A struggle ensues in which the father chokes the son to insensibility and is discovered by the girl. At this juncture the men return from work and find the girl moaning in her sleep. With her awakening comes the realization that her terrible tragedy happened only in dreamland.
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Just a Woman
MovieOct 25, 1912

Just a Woman

Mamie, a girl of the underworld, whose only education has …
Mamie, a girl of the underworld, whose only education has been that of crime, becomes a daring house-breaker and succeeds in looting many of the apartment houses and private residences in the suburbs. Completely nonplussed, the police are obliged to call in special detective service, and a noted sleuth is assigned to the ease. Detective White frequents the haunts of the girl, finally meeting and ingratiating himself in the role of a lover. Disguised as one of the habitués of the dive, he tries for some time to secure damaging evidence, but is unsuccessful. In his attentions to Mamie he arouses the Jealousy of big "Bill," a notorious crook, whose suspicions are aroused as to the detective's true calling. Through persistent shadowing, he finds his suspicions correct and just as the detective had planned to make a clean haul, denounces him before the gang and in the hearing of the girl. Although thoroughly disillusioned, the girl cannot forget the one good influence that entered her life, and as the gang is about to wreak its vengeance, she throws herself upon the gun in the hands of "Big Bill" and in the struggle, receives the shot intended for the detective.
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On the Danger Line
MovieOct 11, 1912

On the Danger Line

On the Danger Line released.
Fate's Way
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MovieSep 20, 1912

Fate's Way

A young man marries Fritzi, who is a very poor housekeeper. He …
A young man marries Fritzi, who is a very poor housekeeper. He has to get his own breakfast, etc., as her only ambition seems to be to take care of her poodle dog. She neglects her husband and gives card parties, etc., to people who are not welcome nor agreeable to him. On a visit to the country, he discovers Florence Barker, a country girl, and falls in love with her, but realizing that he cannot marry her, tells her his plight and asks his wife for a divorce, which she refuses. Years later his wife dies and for old times' sake he goes back to the village in which he met Florence. As he walks down the street intending to pass the home which she occupied years before, he sees a kindly old lady coming from the opposite direction. This old lady proves to be his sweetheart of yore, and there is a happy reconciliation.
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What the Milk Did
MovieAug 23, 1912

What the Milk Did

Major Baldwin, a gay old blade, happens to meet Mrs. Swift, …
Major Baldwin, a gay old blade, happens to meet Mrs. Swift, a former sweetheart, and they incidentally compare notes. The widow informs the major she has a son of marriageable age and the major informs her he has a daughter just ripening into womanhood. They decide it would be a capital idea for their children to fall in love and be united in marriage. The widow broaches the subject to her son, but he is quite averse to entering into any such arrangement. Lucy, the daughter of the major, is quite set in her determination to balk the schemes of the old people. The widow sends her son, Edward, to the country and the major banishes his daughter to the rural district. By one of those antics of fate the stubborn children meet on the same farm, where Lucy assumes the disguise of a dairy maid and Edward masquerades as a farmhand. Lucy milks the cows and Edward drinks the milk, and the manner in which they bring about a realization of the hopes of their parents is ingenious and charming. Lucy writes her father she is engaged to a farmhand and Edward telegraphs that he has met his fate in a dairy maid. The old folks hustle down to the farm and what they discover makes their hearts glad.
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The Golden Rule
MovieAug 16, 1912

The Golden Rule

Alice Holmes, an unsophisticated country girl, has loved …
Alice Holmes, an unsophisticated country girl, has loved indiscreetly, the object of her affections being George Mortimer, a married man. He entreats her to leave her native village with him and she, unsuspecting, consents. She bids adieu to her old home and meets him. Reflecting she asks him to promise to marry her and he refuses, insulting her. She bids him leave her; but it is too late for her to turn back. She goes to the city to hide her shame and there meets him in company with his wife and two children. She confronts him and is rudely thrust aside. She endeavors to secure employment and is found by Donald Rose, a young minister, to whom she pours out her story and is taken to his home and acts as amanuensis. There is a meeting of the trustees of the church and George Mortimer, a member, enters. He sees Alice. When the minister has left the room he tells the members that Alice is a wanton and the minister is firmly but politely requested to dispense with her services. Alice overhears and is grand in her indignation, made desperate by persecution. She addresses the members of the committee and challenges them. It has its effect, although Mortimer is not exposed. The following Sabbath Donald Rose, the pastor, preaches a powerful sermon on sinning and the betrayal of women. Mortimer is in the congregation and he is overcome with remorse and leaves, going into the pastor's study adjoining, where he falls limp and dies. He is found by the minister and Alice and his wife. The story closes with the man of God taking the persecuted young girl in his arms and asking her to be his wife, and she consents.
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The Burglar and the Rose
MovieAug 9, 1912

The Burglar and the Rose

The burglar is a young man, …
The burglar is a young man, driven to crime by force of circumstances. His mother is dying and he has no money to purchase medicine and the necessaries of life. He leaves her and enters a residence and steals a jewel case. He returns home to find his beloved mother dead, and the irony of fate causes him to curse his Maker and dash the baubles on the floor. The girl comes, accompanied by her father. They see his grief, enter the house and the girl places a cluster of roses on the breast of the dead woman, folds the cold hands across the form and goes out, after glancing kindly at the burglar. The remembrance of that scene is fixed indelibly in the mind of the burglar. He is tempted to steal again, but a bouquet of roses brings him to a realization of his crime and he repents. Later he receives a position as gardener on the estate owned by the father of the girl and learns that it was her jewels he stole. He returns them with a full explanation, but is not punished. His reformation comes, naturally. How he finally wins the girl is a sweet and convincing story.
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Dora
MovieAug 2, 1912

Dora

Dora released.
Jane Shore
MovieApr 23, 1912

Jane Shore

This is the story of the goldsmith's wife with whom a king of …
This is the story of the goldsmith's wife with whom a king of England became acquainted. He was so captivated by her beauty that he made her a lady of honor in the palace. Jane so enjoyed the duties in attendance upon the Queen that she refused to return to her husband. Later the King on his deathbed sends for her and dies in her arms. The Duke of Gloucester, the King's brother, accuses her immediately after the King's death of witchcraft and she is stoned to death by the enraged populace.
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Priscilla's Capture
MovieFeb 29, 1912

Priscilla's Capture

Priscilla knowing that thieving tramps are in the …
Priscilla knowing that thieving tramps are in the neighborhood, thinks she sees one in a not very reputable-looking stranger who suddenly appears in the courtyard. With a gun, Priscilla drives him into the chicken-coop, where she holds him a prisoner, and awaits the return of Fred, her brother, who has gone to the station to meet his college chum. But Fred reached the station an hour late and missed his chum, the latter having hired a boy with a motorcycle to act as guide in finding the ranch. The finding, however, proved very disastrous to Fred's chum as evidenced by his tramp-like appearance, and most embarrassing to Priscilla when Fred recognized in the occupant of the chicken-coop, his chum.
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Puppets of Fate
MovieJan 1, 1912

Puppets of Fate

A colonel gives his pistol to a lieutenant in love with his …
A colonel gives his pistol to a lieutenant in love with his wife, but dies of heart failure.
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1911
Jane Shore
MovieNov 2, 1911

Jane Shore

Jane Shore released.
The Elopement
www.imdb.com
MovieOct 1, 1911

The Elopement

A man chases his eloping daughter but is too late.
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Priscilla and the Umbrella
MovieApr 3, 1911

Priscilla and the Umbrella

Paul and Harry certainly …
Paul and Harry certainly have a tempestuous time fighting for the good graces of Priscilla. Paul is such a "boob" that she is forced to rid herself of him and by a clever subterfuge bring Harry to her feet, at the same time finding out how sincerely his affections are towards her. The subtle part of it is that she makes Paul the unconscious instrument of her cunning and he himself was his own executioner.
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Priscilla's April Fool Joke
MovieMar 27, 1911

Priscilla's April Fool Joke

Paul is sitting with Priscilla …
Paul is sitting with Priscilla on a bench in a secluded spot. Paul is reading to Priscilla, but she steals away to gather some flowers to surprise him with. Alice and Harry are viewing this from a distance and when Priscilla has gone Alice conceives the idea of taking her place. When Priscilla returns she finds Paul being fondled by Alice. Ten thousand furies. Another lovers' quarrel ensues. Paul, innocent, tries to explain but Priscilla will not listen. However, the truth of the situation is learned and Priscilla is determined to get even, by turning the laugh on the jokers. Both Paul and Priscilla leave notes in a conspicuous place purporting to their having cast themselves into the sea, leaving their wraps on the shore to apparently verify their act. They are now impressed by the maxim "He laughs best who laughs last."
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His Daughter
MovieFeb 23, 1911

His Daughter

William promises to marry his sweetheart, Mary, after …
William promises to marry his sweetheart, Mary, after completing medical school. William's father has saved enough money to set up William's medical practice. However, Mary's alcoholic ...
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The Diamond Star
MovieFeb 20, 1911

The Diamond Star

John Wilson's growing indifference towards his wife is brought to …
John Wilson's growing indifference towards his wife is brought to a climax when he arrives home on this particular evening, after an afternoon with the boys, in an intoxicated condition. A serious quarrel ensues and they separate, but to avoid scandal to reside in the same house, occupying different apartments. Practically free to do as he pleases, and suffering somewhat from the result of his hasty step, for he really loves his wife, he goes into the circle of the smart set and is fascinated by the belle. This fair charmer being possessed of a host of admirers, he is flattered by her special attentions to him, making him the favored one. He is destined to become a regular attendant at her house parties. Mrs. Wilson learns of this while on a pitiful secret visit to his rooms during his absence and hears the woman call him up by telephone, she picking up the receiver in answer to the ring. A few days later he is especially honored by a dinner given to him by the lady, but falling into his habitual indifference he forgets all about it. The lady in a huff calls him up by 'phone reprimanding him for his neglect. To make reparation for this slight he promises to give her the most beautiful diamond star obtainable, for which he has heard her express a wish. He gets the star and prepares to send it, enclosing a card reading: "Accept this little peace offering and let us be friends again, Jack." He places this in his desk drawer to send to the lady that evening. Meanwhile, she alone and heart-crushed is proffered dangerous diversion by an old-time suitor, who on this day calls to take her auto riding. Wilson sees from his apartment the man leaving his wife's rooms and becomes jealous, which jealousy clears his vision. Realizing his love for his wife and appreciating his own contemptible actions, he is torn with distress. At his office he cannot work, for his mind is ever on his apparently lost love. A little girl next door, having the run of the Wilson apartments, enters John's room and finds the diamond star while playfully rummaging about the room, and innocently takes it to Mrs. Wilson. She upon reading the card naturally thinks it is intended for her and pins it to her corsage, hurrying to her husband's apartment to thank him. He having just arrived in, of course, astounded buy happy that the star, although misgiven, is the result of a reconciliation.
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Priscilla's Engagement Ring
MovieFeb 9, 1911

Priscilla's Engagement Ring

Priscilla is ill with throat …
Priscilla is ill with throat trouble and Paul is much concerned about this and his sympathy for her intensifies his love to such an extent that he proposes. Priscilla, of course, is willing, but papa in a joke declares Paul too young to marry. He must grow whiskers and become more manly. At this point the doctor calls to treat Priscilla for her sore throat. This M.D. is a crank on germs and microbes, arguing that bacteria lurks in everything and thorough and frequent disinfection is our only hope to escape disease. Paul is introduced to the doctor, but before taking Paul's hand Doc disinfects it. Maybe Paul isn't sore, but the worst comes when the disciple of germicides in taking Priscilla's pulse lingers. Paul leaves the house insanely jealous of the doctor, for Priscilla, to tease him, seems to be pleased with the doctor's attentions. However, when Paul arrives at the club he has cooled a bit and decides to call again to see Priscilla. He is met by her mother who hands him a note to the effect that the doctor has forbidden her to see Paul or receive his floral tributes if she hopes to recover. It is a case of "Hearts and Flowers vs. Germs and Microbes." Paul is now furious and determines to do away with himself by smoking himself to death, purchasing all the "weeds" at the club for the purpose. This is rather a slow and disagreeable method so he desists. Furthermore, he reasons that the fickle-hearted Priscilla is not worth it. Priscilla, now cured of her sore throat, is lonesome and longs to see Paul, but her pride prevents her sending for him. Mother, however, sends a note: "There is a little girl who would like to see you." To this Paul sends the answer: "Let the little girl see the germ doctor." It is now Priscilla's turn to get angry and through pique she accepts the proposal of the Germist, inviting the engagement kiss. The doctor is about to kiss her, when he catches himself and disinfects her lips. Oh me! Oh my! But she is wild and chases him out. The mother now sends a second note: "Priscilla cured. The germs and microbes are gone for good." This decides Paul, and calling, everything ends happily. Hearts and flowers are victorious while germs and microbes receiveth a fall.
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A Wreath of Orange Blossoms
MovieJan 30, 1911

A Wreath of Orange Blossoms

The dressmaker's pretty …
The dressmaker's pretty daughter meets the son of her mother's patron while on an errand to deliver a dress. The son is attracted by the girl and later proposes marriage, which she, greatly flattered, accepts. This seems to be a dream to her, but its realization is in marrying the young man. Although the mother of the boy strongly objects to the marriage, still she makes the best of it, and receives the girl in her home as her daughter-in-law. The girl, coming from her humble surroundings, is dazzled by her new experience and, being rather attractive, elicits the attentions of many of the male acquaintances of her husband's family. One in particular is rather more direct than the others and loses no opportunity to place himself in her way. The simple girl is, of course, pleased with these little attentions, particularly as her husband is in a mild state of depression owing to business difficulties. The tempter knows this and becomes assiduous in his advances, which are more mildly repulsed by the wife who feels that her husband is neglecting her. At length the crash comes, and the husband is ruined. Everything lost, they are forced to move to cheaper quarters. This is decidedly irksome to the wife as the taste of luxury has, in a measure, spoiled her. She is in the throes of desperation when the tempter again appears and she becomes an easy prey, consenting to his plea for her to go away with him. Going up to her room to pack her grip, she, while gathering her effects, comes upon the wreath of orange blossoms she wore when she was married. The sight of these blossoms awakens memories of the past and impresses her with the enormity of the step she is thinking of taking. In her mind's eye she sees herself arrayed in her wedding attire, standing beside the man who loves her with an unselfish, honest love she could not hope to find in the man she would take this awful step with. This decides her and she dismisses the tempter and all thoughts of him. Meanwhile, the husband has been downtown where he gets a chance to recoup. Promise of sunshine now hovers over the little home, where a few hours before all was gloom.
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1910
The Recreation of an Heiress
MovieDec 22, 1910

The Recreation of an Heiress

The designing mother …
The designing mother strongly advises her son to look about for a wife with money, and let money play the important factor in the affair rather than love. The mother receives a letter which seems ominous, as it reads: "Dear Friend, I am sending my niece, whom you have never seen, to you for a little recreation. As you know, she is an heiress now, so kindly gratify her every whim." The very chance, so when the young lady arrives with her maid the boy immediately gets busy. The heiress, of course, is wise, and realizes this is no place for her to recreate. However, she feels she must deliver a jolt to this family of fortune hunters, and hence she writes the following letter: "Friend, By chance I learned that the heiress at your house changed places with her maid before arriving. If you are after her money you had better make up to the maid. A Friend." The son at once shifts his attentions to the maid and the niece allows him to go far enough to embarrass himself upon the disclosure when she enters the room with her grip which she peremptorily orders the maid to take, giving the crestfallen mother and son the laugh.
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Happy Jack, a Hero
MovieDec 8, 1910

Happy Jack, a Hero

It is the evening of a reception given by Mr. and Mrs. …
It is the evening of a reception given by Mr. and Mrs. Stamford in honor of their daughter's birthday. The house is beautifully decorated and one of the features is the antique room. In this room stands a figure in a suit of armor of value. During a skylarking between the butler and maid this figure is knocked over and broken. In terror the butler, fearful of the consequences, rushes out to get someone to stand in the suit instead. Happy Jack, the rover, passing by at the time, takes the job on the promise of a good feed. There have been a couple of sneak thieves operating in society circles, and they, learning of the affair, plan to attend. In evening suits, they present themselves and while the butler is engaged with one of them, the other pilfers two invitation cards, which gain them admittance. The daughter is presented by her father with a beautiful diamond and pearl necklace. During the evening the crooks nip it, and going to the antique room to examine their spoil, espy an open safe. This is easy, and they at once begin to help themselves. This is done under the eye of Jack, whom they think a stand of armor. When their work at the safe is about complete. Jack discloses himself, holds them up and hands them into custody. You may imagine his reward now amounts to something more than a feed.
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Effecting a Cure
MovieDec 1, 1910

Effecting a Cure

Mr. Wilkens gets drunk at his club one night and has to rely on …
Mr. Wilkens gets drunk at his club one night and has to rely on the other clubmen to carry him home. In order to cure his drinking, Mrs. Wilkens and the clubmen conspire to play a trick on him. They enlist the aid of a young lady who writes to Mr. Wilkens accepting his marriage proposal of the night before. Mr. Wilkens tries frantically to keep his wife from finding out what he supposedly did.
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The Oath and the Man
www.imdb.com
MovieSep 22, 1910

The Oath and the Man

Before the revolution in France the nobility exercised a most …
Before the revolution in France the nobility exercised a most despotic rule over the peasants, subjecting them to abject slavery. Not only did they suffer pecuniary oppression, but their humble households were invaded and defiled by the noble profligates. Henri Provost, a perfumer, receives a call from his landlord in quest of some perfume. During his visit this nobleman is attracted by Henri's pretty young wife. Her beauty so enthralls him that he, during her husband's absence, exercises his presumed rights, and invites, or rather commands her to attend his house fete. Here he dresses her in finery and promises to make a great lady of her, so that when her husband, who finding whither she had gone, bursts into the palace, she denies him. The heartbroken perfumer at first would return to the palace and in vengeance murder both his wife and the nobleman, but the old priest stays him, by showing him the crucifix, the emblem of Christian charity and making him swear he would never kill them. Indicating that vengeance belonged to God. Henri takes this oath and lives up to it. Some time later the peasants chafing under aristocratic tyranny revolt, with the perfumer a leader. The revolutionists invade the home of the nobleman, the occupants of which flee in panic. The nobleman himself, with the perfumer's wife, who is still with him, make their way to her former home, which she imagines is deserted. The perfumer enters, and upon meeting the guilty pair, sees his chance to wreak vengeance. He is about to run them through when the old priest again appears and shows him the crucifix, reminding him of his oath. He then waves back the mob, who haven't seen the nobleman, with the exclamation, "This is my wife." The mob dismissed, he takes the couple to an inner room where they exchange their finery for peasant's attire. Thus they leave to take their chances of evading intemperate revolutionists who are parading outside, devastating everything and destroying everybody aristocratic. What a bitter lesson she has been taught. Her covetousness has brought her only shame, terror, poverty and isolation.
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A Summer Tragedy
MovieSep 19, 1910

A Summer Tragedy

Clarence Topfloor is given his week's vacation with pay, …
Clarence Topfloor is given his week's vacation with pay, and makes great preparations for his stay at the seashore. In pressing his trousers, he badly scorches them, but thanks to a long coat he is able to hide the damage, so off he starts to give the seaside belles a treat, Adonis II. While Clarence is making these preparations, Mabel is starting off on her vacation. They are, of course, unknown to each other. Mabel vows that she will return from her sojourn with an engagement ring. So you see here are two romantic souls starting out chock-full of determination. Fate is going to be busy. Fortuitously Wavecrest-by-the-Sea Hotel is the destination of both, Mabel arriving first. She is in her room when Clarence arrives. He conceives the idea of playing the part of a millionaire for the week just to see what happens, hence he registers as Reginald Vandergould, Fifth Avenue, New York. Well, maybe he don't stir things. Everybody in the hotel is at attention. Here the "pipe-dream" begins. Mabel and Clarence meet, and, as she is also fostering an iridescent bluff, that of being an heiress, each thinks the other the real article. Down at the shore he points to a steam yacht at anchor as his, but as things aboard are in such confusion, owing to the crew being at work overhauling the "log-book," he is forced to deny her the pleasure of a visit thereon. He doesn't get it on her for an instant, for pointing to a mansion that graces the distant shore as her summer home, she gives as a reason for stopping at the hotel, the servants being house-cleaning, she so disliked the taste of dust. Well, as they look good to each other, he proposes and she accepts. At this point in the romance two things happen, Clarence's time limit is up and his finances are down, so he must tear himself away, but parting is such sweet sorrow, and they leave each other vowing eternal constancy. Once outside the land of Utopia, they awaken. Mabel visits the city drug store to quaff a refreshing flagon of cream soda, when, "discovered!" Who should dole it out but Reginald Vandergould, Fifth Avenue, alias Clarence Topfloor. Another case of Cupid working overtime. At lunchtime Clarence hies himself to a neighboring "Ham and" emporium to have the festive coffee and sinkers served by the fair hands of Mabel; discovery no. 2. Their bluffs punctured, they both make the best of the worst of it, shake and become friends at least.
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Her Father's Pride
MovieAug 4, 1910

Her Father's Pride

The old father in this Biograph story was possessed of such …
The old father in this Biograph story was possessed of such unreasonable pride as to cause much misery and heartache. We cannot consistently call it pride, but rather, narrow prejudice. Mr. and Mrs. Sonthcomb dearly loved their only daughter Ann, but, being Quakers, had set ideas. Ann was a pretty girl of twenty, bright, vivacious and romantic, and loved her parents devotedly, but she chafed under what she deemed almost parental despotism. They decried any ebullition her youth might induce, and frowned into silence her joyous ringing laughter. This condition told on her and she longed for life's radiant sunshine, love. It comes at last. Allen Edwards, a concert singer, while driving his auto in the neighborhood of the old Quaker's farm, meets with a serious accident, and is carried to the Southcomb homestead. He is in such a condition that he cannot be removed to his home for some time, and hence is cared for by the Southcomb family, although the old man openly expresses his aversion for the young man on account of the profession. An attachment springs up between Ann and Allen which ripens into sincere love. The old man is beside himself with rage when they broach the subject of marriage. But Ann is decided and the old man, though he loves his daughter, haughtily drives her from the house, for when pride begins love ceases. He stubbornly refuses to have anything further to do with her. He becomes so bitter that he erases her name from the family Bible. To him she is as dead. Many a heartache does the young wife suffer, though Allen has tried time and time again to effect a reconciliation, until one day they receive word that the old Sonthcomb farm had been seized for debt and the couple were forced to go to the poorhouse. What a shock this is to the young couple! It is the old story of pride defeating its own end by bringing the man who seeks esteem into contempt. The young people make their way to the poorhouse, where the old father is seen scrubbing floors, while the mother bends over a washtub. They are brought to the office to interview their disowned daughter, but the old man is still adamant and while the mother is inclined to accept Ann's protection the father stubbornly refuses, going back with hauteur to his scrub pail. Ann now realizes that something more than bare persuasion must be resorted to, and as she views through the half open door her parents' sad plight, an idea strikes her. Seating herself at the organ, she plays and sings her father's favorite hymn. The sound of the music halts the old man in his work, and he crawls sobbing to the door to hear the better. Ann continues to play and sing until it at last he staggers up to be folded in her arms. He now realizes how unreasonable he has been, not only to her, but to her mother and himself.
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Unexpected Help
MovieJul 28, 1910

Unexpected Help

John Bradley is a trusted clerk with an oil company. Enjoying a …
John Bradley is a trusted clerk with an oil company. Enjoying a fair salary, he is comfortably fixed in a modest little village home with his wife and two small children. Starting from home in the morning he is accompanied by the two little ones, who always looked forward to each morning's scamper in the hills with pleasurable anticipation. He is met at the office door by the manager and handed a large sum of money with instructions to carry it to the bank. This is witnessed by a well-known gambler of the town, who being in hard link, resolves to get that money by hook or crook. Making a short cut across the little town, he manages to intercept John on his way to the bank, and in the course of their conversation invites him to have a drink, as it is half an hour before the bank opens. The invitation is accepted and while in the saloon the gambler tries to inveigle John into a game, but here his will serves him and he resists the fascination. However, he drinks at the serving of the gambler and is the next moment sitting helpless in a chair. The drink was "fixed." When he awakes they all pretend he lost the money at the card table. The influence of the gambler makes this story believed even by the United States marshal to whom he appeals. The poor wife is beside herself with grief when John tell of his misfortune, so she goes about the town imploring her friends' aid in her husband's behalf. They, of course, have heard such stories before, and give her little heed until she meets the parish priest and his assistant. They listen to her tale of woe, and having on them pistols, which they carry for protection while passing over the hills, feel sure of getting at the truth of the situation with these terrifying implements. Making their way to the saloon, they take the gambler unawares. Under the menace of these two big six-shooters his hands go up, and while his assistant and the wife hold the guns the old priest searches the gambler, regaining the purse of money intact. This the wife joyously carries to her husband, who takes it off to the bank. The old priest, however, admonishes John, warning him to avoid such chances in the future. It is needless to say that John has been taught a lesson.
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A Child's Faith
MovieJul 14, 1910

A Child's Faith

At the opening of the story we find Alice Paulton incurring the …
At the opening of the story we find Alice Paulton incurring the extreme displeasure of her father by rejecting the suit of the favored young man of her father for one of her own choice. Determined to marry this man she is disowned by her father, and so leaves his roof and is married. Mr. Paulton, being a widower, at first grieves over the loss of his daughter's love, but later becomes a monomaniac, money being his only thought, and to hoard this his only aim. He becomes a veritable tyrant, grinding his debtors most unreasonably. Thus things go on for several years. Meanwhile a girl child has blessed the young couple, and at the end of ten years the young father is in the last stage of consumption, with little strength left to work. Dire poverty reigns in the household, and in desperation the wife goes to her father to implore his aid. He is now in the extreme of money madness, and almost throws her from his house. The worst is to come, and it comes soon; the young father dies. Here the poor woman is left destitute, with her little girl to care for. Her attempts to secure employment are in vain and starvation stares them in the face. But the little child has faith in prayer. The old man's temper has now gotten worse and his niggardliness more excessive, until finally he sells his home that he may add the returns to his hoard and moves into cheaper quarters. Fate leads him to engage the squalid room directly above his own daughter and granddaughter, although he is quite unaware of it. He is at a loss to find a place to hide his money until he espies a stove-pipe hole in the chimney wall. This he reckons a safe bank, so here he keeps it. On the floor below we see the poor woman despairing, until when she leaves for the next room, the child kneels and prays for aid. At the same moment the old man is replacing his gold in his chimney bank, and shoving it in too far, down the chimney it falls, striking the fireplace below and rolling out in front of the kneeling child. She at once believes it came from the Heavenly Father, and so kneels in thanksgiving. The old man becomes a raging demon at the loss of his money, and when the janitor directs him to the apartment beneath he bursts in and snatches the money from the child's bands. The confusion brings in the mother, and a recognition occurs. The old man is adamant, however, and still refuses aid to his daughter. While in the hall on his way to his own apartment, the thought of the little child on her knees praying with such faith impresses him, and changes his entire nature Well, he returns to his daughter and granddaughter for good.
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A Midnight Cupid
MovieJul 7, 1910

A Midnight Cupid

Perry Dudley, a young man of wealth and position, is the …
Perry Dudley, a young man of wealth and position, is the center of attraction with the matchmaking mothers, as he is considered the season's best catch. The daughters are by no means backward. In obtruding themselves to his notice. In fact, he is so annoyed and bored by this bevy of fawning females that his life becomes one of ennui. He longs for a change where people are less superficial. While fulfilling one of his social obligations his house is entered by a poor unfortunate tramp, a veritable soldier of misfortune. The poor fellow has a letter in his pocket from friends in his native village from whence he left when but a small boy. The missive asks that he return and he will be taken care of. He is inclined to go, but cannot make the trip on an empty stomach, so his visit to the Dudley mansion is in quest of food. He finds no one at home, and espying a decanter of wine on the table, in lieu of food, takes a drink. The wine has both an intoxicating and soporific effect, and when Perry returns he finds his nocturnal visitor on the floor in a profound bacchanalian slumber. As he lifts him to a chair Perry sees the letter, which he reads. What a chance. He decides at once to disguise himself and go to the country in the tramp's place, assuming that no one would recognize the deception. Placing a ten-dollar bill in the tramp's pocket instead of the letter, he instructs his valet and butler to take the sleeping tramp out and lay him on a bench in the park. Off Perry goes to present himself as the long-lost native, and has little trouble in convincing the old tanner that he is the personage to whom the letter is addressed. Of course, he is welcomed, but one thing he didn't bargain for was work on the farm; still he must endure it. Another thing he didn't bargain for, but is willing to endure, is the companionship of farmer's pretty daughter. It is a case of love on both sides. Meanwhile, the tramp awakening and finding the money, resolves to go back to his old home. His arrival is uneventful, as no one will believe him until he shows the farmer several marks or scars of identification as proof, hence the farmer chases Perry off and locks the daughter in her room. But, pshaw! As they appreciate the fact that love has ever given locksmiths the merry ha ha, they won't let a little thing like that break their romance, so they elope. When they arrive at Perry's mansion the girl is amazed, but is reassured by the presence of a minister, who makes them one just as the old father, who has followed with a neighbor, enters. He not only makes the best of the situation, but considers himself the most fortunate father in Christendom with his daughter making such a match.
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A Victim of Jealousy
MovieJun 9, 1910

A Victim of Jealousy

The young husband's irrational jealousy makes him …
The young husband's irrational jealousy makes him suspicious of every attention bestowed upon his wife. Even the minister, who performed their marriage ceremony, making a pastoral call annoys him. They attend a social gathering, and his ill-concealed perturbation at his young wife's affability with all present spoils her evening's pleasure, and finally induces her to ask to be taken home. Arriving home, a stormy scene ensues, and there might have been a separation but for the wife's subtleness in placing within his range delicate reminders of her own gentleness. He is awakened from his present dementia and promises never to act so foolishly again. The next morning as he is about to leave for his office, he is sincere in his protestations of faith, but upon returning to his library to secure some business papers, he hears a man's voice issuing from the reception room, and upon entering finds his wife's milliner, who has come with her hat. He orders the man out and unjustly upbraids his wife. Not only that, he instructs his valet to watch. This of course, is fine for the valet, as he sees gain in it. During the afternoon lady friends of the wife call and beg her to accompany them to the art studio to look over some paintings they think of purchasing. While at the studio, her friends are called away for a few moments and ask her to wait until they return. Meanwhile, the valet has learned of the wife's visiting the studio and so informs the husband. The intelligence throws him into a frenzy, and rushing home secures a revolver and heads to avenge his fancied wrong. The wife's sister sees this and hastens to apprise her of her danger. Up to now the friends have not returned and the wife is place in a very embarrassing position, but the sister hurries her into an adjoining room, from which she escapes by another door for home. Unfortunately, the wife in her haste drops her scar, which the husband recognizes, and dashing into the adjoining room, just as the other door closes behind his wife, finds his sister-in-law who claims the scarf. Returning home he finds his wife, who confesses that she really was at the studio, and relates the details which are corroborated by her friends who now appear. The wife's patience is tried to the limit and she determines to leave him at once, so it is only upon his solemn promise never again to mistrust her that she remains.
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The Impalement
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MovieMay 30, 1910

The Impalement

Walter Avery is blessed with a most dutiful and loving wife, whose …
Walter Avery is blessed with a most dutiful and loving wife, whose every endeavor and thought is to make him happy, but he being a man of the world, finds domestic life dull, and his wife's attentions boring. Hence, it is with eagerness that he accepts invitations to the different social functions. Accompanied by his wife, he attends a social gathering and there meets a young dancing girl, society's favorite entertainer. He is immediately obsessed with an infatuation for the girl, and it is evident that his feelings are reciprocated. Mrs. Avery's suspicions are aroused and she accuses him of undue attentions toward the dancer. He, of course, denies her accusations and cajoles her into believing that his thoughts are always only for her. Nevertheless, the time comes when she sees positive proof of his perfidy in a letter to him from the girl inviting him to attend a dinner at her house given in his honor, hoping he will not fail to grace the occasion. When he is about to leave for the dancer's home, Mrs. Avery picks up a bottle of poison, threatening to take her life if he goes. Regarding this threat merely a jealous woman's trick to keep him home, he not only treats it with derision, but pours the contents of the bottle into a goblet, remarking that it would be more convenient to take it that way, and off he goes. When he is gone the true aspect of the situation dawns on her. She realizes for the first time what a despicable wretch he is, and not worth the effort to save him, so she dashes the glass with its contents to the floor. However, the strain of the ordeal through which she has passed proves too much for her, and she falls in a swoon to the floor. Meanwhile, Avery has reached the home of the dancer, and is toasted at his entrance. By strange coincidence, the glass handed to him is identical with the one he handed his wife. He at once becomes conscience-stricken that his wife may have carried out her threat. Rushing back to his home he finds his wife in a swoon, but he thinks her dead. Dead, and he caused it! At this moment he becomes a veritable maniac. Dashing madly out of the house, he re-enters the dancer's home like a fiend. The guests are thrown into a panic as he shrieks, "I killed my wife! I killed my wife!" and falls across the table dead, struck down by the relentless avenger of injured virtue.
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A Knot in the Plot
MovieMay 26, 1910

A Knot in the Plot

You never can tell from where you stand whether it will be hit or …
You never can tell from where you stand whether it will be hit or miss and presumption is sometimes pardonable, for in the affair of Jim Doyle, the dandified cowboy of the camp, it looked as though the race was his. He was in fine form, the track was good and he was certainly in the running. Milly Howard, the belle of the camp, certainly gave all the impression that things were pretty well understood between them, as she seemed attracted by Jim's manly hearing, dandy appearance and extreme good nature, and so the boys all withdrew their suits, that is, all but one, Manuel the Mexican. He loved, and when he loved he was determined. So he sets to work to cut Dandy Jim out, and he succeeds. Jim, however, is persistent and one day escorts the fair Milly to her home from the village store. The sight of Jim and Milly strolling along together knocks to "pi" in the minds of the boys the Mexican's yarn that he and Milly are engaged, and when they see him they twit him about it. Manuel is furious and goes to see the girl, accusing her of being false to their troth, and so spurns her. Milly, at his departure, falls sobbing to the ground. Two of the boys pass at this moment and imagining her grief due to a jilt by Jim, go off to find the supposed offender. Meanwhile, Manuel has relented and hurries Milly off to the minister's, where they are married, thus ending their unrest. The gang have surprised Jim, and before he has a chance to speak, bind and gag him. Jim has a sneaking suspicion that it is to be a lynching-bee, but is ignorant of the cause. The boys hustle him along, passing the minister's house, whom they call to accompany them. Jim believes the minister's services are enlisted for his funeral, so you may imagine his surprise when they halt in front of Milly's residence, and calling her out demand the minister to marry her and Jim at once. Milly refuses to become a bigamist, the minister refuses to perform the ceremony until the Mexican consents to make her a widow, and although Jim would be most willing to marry her he realizes the conditions prevent.
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An Affair of Hearts
MovieMay 19, 1910

An Affair of Hearts

In this comedy we are introduced to the impulsive hearted …
In this comedy we are introduced to the impulsive hearted Frenchman. For him to see a pretty woman is to love her, heedless of the disaster his attendant persistence may incur, as it is that when Mons. Borni espies the fair unknown he is anxious to become her abject slave. She, however, resents his independence and in his delection he writes to his dear friend, Mons. Renay, the following: "My dear Renay, I love, I worship a lady I do not know. From no one can I find out who she is. I have just seen her. I must know her and make her my wife. What shall I do? My dear friend. I crave your help. Gaston Borni." Mons. Renay hies to his dear friend's assistance and the first sight they get of the fair lady is as she speeds through the park in her auto. She is alone, and they engage a small runabout to follow her. Borni, of course, paying for it. As there is but one front seat, Renay takes this, while the lovestruck Borni is forced to occupy the footman's chair, but what cares he, so long as it will take him into the presence of his charmer? They follow her auto until it arrives at the lady's home, which she enters hurriedly. A policeman is standing by, and they, that is, Borni, pay him to divulge the name of the fair goddess, but after pocketing the liberal bribe he tells them he is very sorry to say he doesn't know her. But they reason faint heart ne'er won fair lady, so they persist, and the next time they encounter her riding horseback. Here Mons. Renay woos her on his own account, his pervious heart having also been touched. Her horse enable her to distance them, but a bicycle rider appears and they procure the wheel. Borni again paying the fee, but Renay decamps on it. This endeavor also proves a failure, and meeting a hunter in the woods they, Borni, of course, purchase his guns in a duel. This procedure is not as acceptable as they imagine, for they realize it takes a certain amount of nerve to stand up as a target, even though you yourself may have a human target at your disposal. Well, while they parley, the lady views with amusement their antics from her veranda, and she decides it is now time to put a stop to their imbecility, so dispatching her maid to the field of honor, the valorous lovers are invited to appear at the house. They both declare their undying love for the fair unknown; they would fight for her; they would lay down their lives for her, but when her sturdy robust husband appears, they find they have pressing engagements elsewhere.
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The Gold Seekers
MovieMay 2, 1910

The Gold Seekers

The maxim, "'Tis darkest just before dawn," was certainly …
The maxim, "'Tis darkest just before dawn," was certainly verified in the case of the despairing prospector who is the subject of this Biograph story. All his searching for the coveted yellow ore has been fruitless, and he starts out to make his last effort to find pay dirt. The privations he has suffered do not affect him as much as the hardships endured by his patient wife with their little child, a boy of ten years. To see them subjected to hunger and exposure almost drives him mas, and this final effort is almost maniacal. As usual, his endeavors seem to be in vain, until in a fit of rage he hurls his pick away from him and sinks despairingly on the ground. Here he sits hopeless, when he sees something shining in the earth that the pick's point had upturned when he hurled it from him. He is dazed, and can scarcely believe his sight. However, a pan of the dirt taken to the brook and washed proves he has at last struck pay dirt. Wild with joy, he rushes to his camp to give the news to his wife. She reminds him of the importance of filing his claim at once, and to this end the three, man, wife and child, go back to the place and he stakes the claim, guarding it, while the wife hurries to the agent's office to file it, she taking the little boy with her. Two mountain reprobates from a distance see the staking of the claim, and knowing that the first one filing the claim may secure it, try to reach the agent before her, but as she is on horseback and they on foot, she reaches there first. When she arrives she finds the office not yet open and a line of prospectors awaiting the agent's arrival. The two scoundrels now scheme to get the wife's place in the line, and to effect this they play upon her sympathy by getting an unconscionable old woman to feign illness and ask to be assisted to her home. This the wife does, the scoundrels following and locking her in a room with her little boy. They go back to the agent to secure his recognition of their claim. After futile efforts to burst the door, the wife lets the baby through the transom on a rope, telling him to run for help. This the little fellow manfully does, and after a time engages the attention of a couple of ranchers, who release the poor woman, rushing her to the land agent's office just as he is about to sign the claim of the scoundrels. The agent listens to the woman's story, backed up by the ranchers and the baby, and signs the claim, handing it to her, at the same time pushing a pistol in the scoundrels' faces with the injunction, "Now, git," and they very wisely "got."
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Up a Tree
MovieApr 28, 1910

Up a Tree

Jake, a young country lout, comes into the possession of a …
Jake, a young country lout, comes into the possession of a ladder and plans to have some fun. Placing the ladder against a tall tree, he climbs up and lodges his cap in the branches. Descending, he waits at the foot, and when an old farmer appears, Jake begins to blubber, crying that his cap is in the tree, where he tossed it after a bird, and, pretending lameness, he beseeches the farmer to get it. Up the farmer climbs and dislodges the cap, just when he attempts to descend he finds that Jake has removed the ladder. He is "treed" and no mistake. This trick worked so well, that Jake is encouraged to try it again. This time his victims are a couple of lovers who have quarreled. The beau in a huff, refuses when the sweetheart suggests he get the boy's cap, so she to shame him, climbs up herself. Fine! The lover follows, paying Jake to do the very thing he intended, remove the ladder. Of course, the girl is wild, but the lover is in his element. Here they are "treed" side by side on the limb. Same thing happens, only Jake drives off in the wagon to find another easy mark, which he does in the person of a Jew carrying two live chickens. Jake has visions of a chicken pie, but his dream fades for the Jew carries the birds up the ladder. Further on Jake sells the horse, wagon and ladder to a painter for four dollars. Cheap, of course, but it is velvet to him. With the money he goes to the summer garden restaurant and purchases four dollars' worth of May wine. Meanwhile, the man with the wagon has retraced the route taken by Jake and comes upon the treed ones. All are anxious to be rescued but the young lover, who spurns their assistance until his sweetheart accepts him, which she finally does. The victims then band together to wreak vengeance, and fortune soon favors them, for along comes Jake, their persecutor, lame from head to feet. They pounce upon him, and after administering chastisement, carry him up into one of the trees, where they leave him to think it over.
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The Way of the World
MovieApr 25, 1910

The Way of the World

The old priest is deeply grieved over the empty church, when …
The old priest is deeply grieved over the empty church, when his young assistant decides to follow the Master's footsteps and go among the people as an example. Donning civilian garb, he goes out into the world to work in the fields. Here he learns the extreme thoughtlessness and selfishness of humanity. There are the two classes, the money seekers and the pleasure seekers. The former are shown in the fields and store houses, each struggling for himself unmindful of the condition of his neighbor, all driven by an unreasonable employer. The latter class is seen spending their time in a dance resort. The first have a standard of morals dependent upon their success in life, while the others have no standard of morals whatever, for the simple reason that they know no better. The young priest, incog, becomes a worker at the storehouse, dispensing his earnings in charity, while endeavoring to plant the seed of righteousness in the hearts of his fellow laborers, but his endeavors are met with derision. He is almost on the point of giving up when the dance resort is raided by the police and the women of the place flee in a panic, with the exception of one, who turns to the ones who brought her there for protection. Ah, but how like the world, they not only turn from her, but even assist in her ejection from the place and follow her tauntingly down the road, their crowd augmented by many curiosity seekers until there is a howling mob at her heels. At this moment the young priest appears and driving off her persecutors, leads the poor unfortunate Magdalene away to find some place of healthy safety for her, but again the world shows its unchristian spirit by refusing to receive her. Hopeless, the young priest makes his way back to the mission where he tells the old pastor that "They receive me not." He has hardly uttered the words when the girl appears and prostrates herself before the two holy men to ask their prayers for God's grace, determined to spend the rest of her life penitentially. The old father turns to the young curate and exclaims, "Not in vain if one soul is save." The scenes of the production are laid at the historical San Gabriel Mission, California.
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The Tenderfoot's Triumph
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MovieApr 21, 1910

The Tenderfoot's Triumph

"It's in the surprise" that great …
"It's in the surprise" that great plays are made and battles won, and our tenderfoot friend, appreciating this, pulls a victory that is amazing. The western camp folks had suffered the loss of a number of horses at the hands of a gang of horse thieves led by Black Pete, who up to date eluded the United States Marshal and his deputies. Their deeds becoming more brazen, a notice is posted offering a reward of $500 for the apprehension of Pete, and while this reward is rather tempting, former efforts have proven so fruitless that the boys of the camp are slow to more. The marshal has a pretty daughter, on whom every boy has set his heart. They vie good naturedly with each other in engaging her attentions, but she treats them all with the same consideration, liking them all, but no one in particular. It remains for one of them to do something extraordinary. Ah! An idea, "Say, boys, I like you all immensely, but I will give my hand for keeps to the captor of Pete." With a cheer the boys rush to get into saddle, all eager for the expedition. At this moment, all eager for the expedition. At this moment, a handsome young minister arrives at the Inn, and upon learning the cause of the excitement, wishes, after meeting the girl, that he was eligible for the contest. The more he thinks of the matter the more he longs to play the hero. The cowboys are already on their way and have taken all the available horses, and the only beast of burden at hand is a donkey. However, on this he starts, alone and unarmed. The girl, though feeling kindly towards him, considers his efforts a joke. Meanwhile, the cowboys have been surprised by the horse thieves, who disarm them, take their horses and order them back to camp. Well, never was there such a gang of shamefaced cowboys as this when they meet the minister on their return trip. They try to convince the young tenderfoot that his endeavor will prove futile, but he is determined to take the chance. He resolves that his movements must be subtle and cunning, and so he schemes. Talking out his prayer book, he saunters along the ridge above the thieves' lair, and seemingly tumbles over into their very arms. For a moment his chances of life are slim, but they accept his explanation that he was reading and not looking where he was going. His manner and speech throws them off their guard, and watching his chance, he grabs up two revolvers and orders "Hands up." Well, "it's in the surprise." There are four in the gang, so he makes one bind up the three while he keeps the guns leveled at them like a string of fish he brings Pete and his gang into camp, where he claims and gets the $500 reward together with the special inducement, the heart of the girl, which she most cheerfully gives.
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The Kid
MovieApr 14, 1910

The Kid

To Walter Holden since the death of his wife, falls the …
To Walter Holden since the death of his wife, falls the responsibility of raising his only child, a boy about twelve years old. Holden being of domestic tastes, feels the loneliness of the home without his wife, despite the presence of this interesting boy. The youngster, ebullient in spirits, was, while a source of anxiety, a great balm to his crushed heart, and father and son were almost constant companions. Like all boys of his age, he is a bit wild and prankish, and we find him amusing himself playing cowboy and soldier, with an old-fashioned flint-lock pistol and cowboy makeup. His father enters into the fun for a time as earnestly as the Kid. Finally the Kid goes out into the field to play the game. A short distance from the house is a very tall windmill tower and to the top of this, by means of a ladder, climbs pretty Doris Marshall to enjoy the beautiful view therefrom. The Kid happens along, and seeing the pretty girl on the tower, an idea strikes him. "Aha! The fair maid will be a prisoner on the tower." This he effects by removing the ladder, and so she remains until the father seeking the whereabouts of the boy, discovers his deed, and rescues Doris from her lofty position. This is their first meeting and they are visibly attracted by each other; even the Kid takes a fancy to Doris, and wants her to come along with pop and him. An energetic Cupid, to say the least. Well, the girl is again irresistibly drawn to the tower. By a trick of fate, the father also climbs the tower, not knowing Doris is already there. Here is fine sport for the Kid. By removing the ladder he makes prisoners of them both. Here he tantalizingly keeps them until the novelty of the act wanes. They are, however, together long enough to intensify the feeling induced by their first meeting. Upon reaching ground, the father makes a faint attempt to spank the Kid, but Doris begs him not to. This raises her still higher in the esteem of the Kid, and he renews his pleas for her to come with them. Well, the boy's trick results in a new mamma for him.
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The Two Brothers
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MovieApr 4, 1910

The Two Brothers

In Camarillo, principality of the Spanish dominion, there …
In Camarillo, principality of the Spanish dominion, there lived two brothers, Jose and Manuel. Born in a noble Spanish family and reared by a mother noble in both station and character, they were vastly different morally. Jose was a dutiful son and upright young man, while Manuel was the black sheep. It was on Easter Sunday morning during the processional that Manuel appears in an intoxicated condition and foully ridicules the priests and acolytes as they enter the chapel of the old mission. At this the mother's pride is hurt beyond endurance and she exiles her profligate son from her forever. Manuel is shunned as a viper and while making his way along the road, meets Pedro, the notorious political outlaw, who sympathizes with him and offers him inducements to join him, and so takes him to his camp. Meanwhile, Jose woos and wins the Red Rose of Capistran and the day for the wedding is set. Manuel finds the life in the outlaws' camp palls, and, drawn by irresistible memories, he visits his home village, Here he is shot in the arm by his brother, who hounds him, and escapes further injury by hiding among the ruins of the mission, where he is discovered later by the Rose and her girl companion, who relieve his agony by dressing his wounded arm. He goes back to the outlaw camp with a firm purpose of revenge. The wedding of Jose and the Red Rose has taken place and the young couple start for their new home with their friends, by the coach. On this coach is also the rich dowry chest. This the outlaw learns and here appears the brother's chance for revenge, so gathering together the band to pursue the wedding party, they overtake the coach, but not until Pedro has fallen and Manuel assumes leadership. Jose is dragged from the conveyance and brought before his brother, who is about to dispatch him, when the bride and her friend rush up. He now sees that they and his succor when wounded at the mission are the same, hence he allows all to go on their way unharmed. The little friend of the bride who assisted in aiding the wounded brother at the mission, fell in love with him at first sight, and at this second meeting she makes clear her feeling for him. He, on the other hand, is struck by the artlessness of the pretty little Senorita and later finds himself her willing slave, and it is with amazement that the villagers see her lead Manuel into the chapel. Thus he finds love the master to curb and finally dissipate his impious inclinations.
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Faithful
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MovieMar 21, 1910

Faithful

John Dobbs, a young man in good circumstances, goes a …
John Dobbs, a young man in good circumstances, goes a-courting, and returning from the home of his lady fair, his auto runs down Zeke, the vacuum-pated roustabout of the town. Although Zeke was not hurt, he was the recipient of a severe jolt which gave him a temporary case of nerves, which scared John into a fit of earnest solicitude. Imagining the tattered condition of Zeke's clothing was due to the accident, he not only soothes his imaginary hurts with a balm of silver dollars, but takes him to the store and buys him a suit of "hand-me-downs." Zeke is quite unaccustomed to such a bestowal of munificence, and his gratitude is accordingly excessive. So much so that he then and there swears eternal friendship: that he will never desert him; that he will stick to John through thick and thin. John cries. "Holy smoke! What am I up against?" and jumping into his auto dashes off under the impression that he has left the poor simple-minded Zeke on the sidewalk. But not so, for when he alights at his home, Zeke is there beside him, having hooked on behind the machine as it darted off. Well, John's troubles have only begun. He can't move but what Zeke is at his side, his face wreathed in a smile that is childlike and bland, exclaiming, "I can't be happy away from you." Thinking he has eluded his zealous friend, John visits his sweetheart, and during an interesting moment of their tete-a-tete, Zeke's head appears between, earnestly pleading his friend's cause. This sends the girl away in a huff and John receives a letter later that it is all off between them, as she did not know when she became engaged that she would have to tolerate his idiotic friend. This throws John into such a rage that he feels like murdering faithful Zeke. He does, however, club him, but Zeke receives the blows with angelic smiles. It is no use. Flight seems the only course, and John beats it. He has covered miles and sinks down from sheer exhaustion. There he sits, panting, but happy in the thought of at last evading his tormentor, only to glance up and see Zeke's beatific countenance gazing fondly down at him, "Well, I suppose I must make the best of it." So he takes Zeke by the hand and resolves to accept his well-meant devotion. Henceforth the two are inseparable. Zeke, however, has his good qualities and is always solicitous of John's welfare. Later, Zeke has an opportunity of showing his true value. The house in which John's former sweetheart resides is afire, and the girl is in great danger of perishing in the flames, when Zeke passes. The whole town is in a panic, and the first thought was the fire company, whose aid is instantly summoned. While the firemen are dashing furiously to the scene, Zeke is playing the brave hero, for seizing a ladder close by he ascends to the window of the girl's room and carries her down to safety. John has heard of the conflagration and thinking only of the girl's evident peril, rushes up to find her safely in the arms of faithful Zeke. Things are squared and the value of Zeke's devotion recognized and appreciated.
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The Love of Lady Irma
MovieMar 17, 1910

The Love of Lady Irma

Lady Irma is the wife of a …
Lady Irma is the wife of a handsome man who is the object of admiration of all the women, and wherever he appears they flock about him to such an extent that the wife, though assuming that she is not jealous, is afraid that their excessive adulation may turn his head and she will he forgotten. She asks herself if she can hold his love. She, with candor, realizes that she is not more beautiful than most of them, and maybe not as attractive as some. Here she is tortured by fears, although he is devoted to her. Protestations on his part serve but little to ease her mind when she sees him in the midst of a throng of admiring women, and her perturbation is ill-concealed. To her best friend she is about to write her fears, and ask advice, when an idea occurs to her. If he was not so handsome they would possibly not so thoroughly monopolize his attentions. If he could only meet with some disfiguring accident, at this point of her soliloquy a horrible plan presents itself to her mind and she impetuously puts it into effect, engaging the services of a couple of thugs to waylay her husband and sear his face in a manner to disfigure his beauty. For this she pays them a considerable sum. The deed is perpetrated and the affair is enveloped in mystery, as there appeared to be no plain reason for the assault. However, the wounds heal, but he is brutally disfigured for life. It is now that Lady Irma feels the awful weight of remorse, which is not even lightened by the contemptuous attitude of the women at his appearance. This is not the worst torment, for the thugs, appreciating the hold they have on her, use a threat to expose her as a means to extort more money. During one of their visits they are surprised by the husband, who throws them bodily out of the house. Reasoning that he will sooner or later learn the truth, she confesses. He is at first amazed, but upon learning what had induced her step, he forgives her.
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The Man
MovieMar 12, 1910

The Man

The Man released.
The Newlyweds
MovieMar 3, 1910

The Newlyweds

A young man and a young woman, each unlucky in love, …
A young man and a young woman, each unlucky in love, determine never to marry. But Cupid has other ideas.
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One Night, and Then --
MovieFeb 14, 1910

One Night, and Then --

Henry Revol was a wealthy …
Henry Revol was a wealthy bachelor, who had nothing but time and money at his disposal. We see him at his mansion in the midst of a Bohemian gathering. The party is made up of the lights of theatrical, literary and art circles. It is nothing unusual, simply one of the reckless affairs so often held at his home. These are the "false pleasures" of life, made all the more pronounced when contrasted with the "simple life," a scene in a humble home where a mother lives in the love of her children. Revol is simply burned up by the fires of dissipation, and at a succeeding affair falls fainting in his chair. The doctor summoned, tells anticipate fate, but the thought of the jeering of his fawning friends pricks his pride, when a plumber enters his home to do some repairing. An idea strikes him. He will exchange clothes with him and go out somewhere incog. This he does, and after leaving what money he has about him on the mantel, only taking enough to pay for a room for the night, and throwing his now useless keys in the fireplace, he leaves and engages a room in the poor section of the town. Paying for the room, he sits with revolver in hand while he smokes the last cigarette. As he blows the last puff of smoke out, he places the pistol to his head, when a low, sorrowful moan reaches his ears. He listens, but all is still. Again, the pistol is raised, and again the cry, now louder and more prolonged. Going to the connecting door he plainly hears the sobbing of a woman in grief. He knocks, and the door is opened, and there he sees the poor mother bending over her sick child, helpless, as she hasn't any money for medicine or food. Here is his opportunity, but as is nearly always the case, there is an obstacle. He has no ready money himself. He will return to his home for it, but how will he get in as he has thrown away his keys and destroyed his identity? Under these conditions, he is forced to break into his own house to bestow his charity. This arouses the servants and he is shot down as a burglar. When they discover his identity they summon the doctor, to whom he exclaims: "Doctor, you can do nothing for me. Go and relieve the wants of the poor family." This the doctor does, and Revol's last moments are made bright in the thought of being at last given an opportunity to do good. The next day when the doctor visits the poor woman, sunshine bathes the modest home, and she wants to know what return she can make for all these blessings. The doctor at first intimates nothing, when he notices a lily in a vase at the head of the child's bed. This he takes and places on the bier of Revol. "And the greatest of these is charity."
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The Course of True Love
MovieFeb 7, 1910

The Course of True Love

Miss Florabel Thurston is …
Miss Florabel Thurston is betrothed to Ben Lawrence, a young artist. One day while at work in his studio, a poor little flower seller calls to sell her blossoms. She is cold and hungry, and Lawrence sits her down before the lunch spread for him, but which he has not touched. It happens that Miss Thurston drops in at the studio at this time and, finding the flower girl and aware that she is not a model, leaves abruptly in a huff. Under the influence of her mother (who has long been cheated on by Mr. Thurston), Florabel is about to break off the engagement. The flower girl however, learning of the trouble she has innocently caused, hastens to put things right. Explanations bring a reconciliation of Ben and Florabel.
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The Call
MovieJan 20, 1910

The Call

A story of life under the "white top." Edith Lawson is engaged as …
A story of life under the "white top." Edith Lawson is engaged as the star dancer of a traveling tent show. Her circus name is Fatima. Billy Harvey, one of the performers, and a part owner of the show, is, or rather pretends to be, in love with Fatima, and she loves him in return. The arduous duties have made the poor girl ill but her managers cruelly insist that she must appear, as she is a feature. During her dance, however, she faints from weakness, and the audience is dismissed. Amos Holden, a young merchant in the village, who is in the audience, is deeply moved by the poor girl's predicament, and determines to help her. He writes her a letter which she receives after her second attempt and failure to go through her dance. She is discharged and cast adrift by her managers, and as a resort seeks out Amos. He has fallen in love with her and she never having been accorded such tender treatment feels for the first time the power of pure honest love. Shortly afterwards they are married, and Edith seems happy and has grown strong in her new life. She feels that the circus fever has left her forever, but one day during the following year she finds a handbill advertising the return engagement of "Harvey's mammoth aggregation of celebrities," and the fancied smell of the sawdust reaches her nostrils. The inclination is almost overpowering, and a surreptitious visit from Harvey decides her. Leaving a note for her husband, she goes back to the circus, hut it is not many moments before she realizes the error of her way, and how loathsome are the surroundings. Hence she rushes from the tent to her home to find her letter has not yet fallen into the hands of Amos. Edith is now thoroughly cured of the circus
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Her Terrible Ordeal
www.imdb.com
MovieJan 10, 1910

Her Terrible Ordeal

An absent-minded business man is about to be off on a journey. …
An absent-minded business man is about to be off on a journey. He leaves his son and his secretary (who, unbeknownst to him, are in love) in charge of the office. The two soon find the boss's wallet on the floor, and the son rushes off to catch up with his father. While he's gone, a poor vendor seizes the opportunity to turn robber. He grabs the secretary's purse and locks her in the airtight vault. The son returns, and soon he becomes aware of his beloved's plight. He doesn't know and cannot find the combination to the vault, so off he goes again to catch dear old dad. He just misses dad's train and sends a telegram ahead to have his father return immediately. But dad wasn't on the train. He had forgotten important papers that he needed for the trip. Now he's back at the office, blissfully unaware that his secretary is dying just a few feet away. Then off he goes again. The son returns and is told (by a man who was unaware of the secretary's plight) that he has just missed his father. Away the son rushes again. This time he catches up with dad. Back they run to the office, and the girl is freed in the very nick of time.
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The Dancing Girl of Butte
MovieJan 6, 1910

The Dancing Girl of Butte

Bella is a dancer in a music …
Bella is a dancer in a music ball at Butte. She is pretty, light-hearted, and yet possessed of a refined nature that commands a respect not looked for in such surroundings. Strolling through the city park one morning, she steps on an uneven spot in the path and turns her ankle. Her cry of pain brings to her aid Howard Raymond, who assists her to her home. Bella's demure manner and pretty face appeal to Howard, and he realizes it is a case of love at first sight. Bella, herself, is deeply impressed with the young man the accident has caused her to meet. However, she realizes her position and dissipates all serious thoughts on the matter. Howard, who is a newspaper artist and an enthusiast in all respects, tells his fellow artists of his love for the unknown girl. They, being used to his impetuousness, simply smile. On this occasion he is in earnest, and hastening back to the girl's house, he surprises her in her dance hall attire. This she explains by making him believe that she is a member of a traveling dramatic company. Well, it is the old story. The accident was simply a trick of Cupid to bring two hearts together, and they are betrothed. They exchange photographs, and when he shows her picture to his friends they recognize in it the dancing girl. So they go to the girl and ask her to give him up. This she is loath to do, admitting that while she has danced at the hall, the work was detestable. Finding her unwilling to repulse his suit, they tell Howard of her calling, which he does not believe, and knocks one of them down for what he regards an insult. The girl, however, in honesty enters and admit the truth, taking the artist to the place where she works. What a blow to the poor fellow, and he turns from her with a crushed heart. Cut to the quick by his repulsion, she tells him that although she has been forced to earn a living in this fusion, she is through with it all, and while her soul is pure she will leave it. The sincerity of her tone softens the young man, and turning, he takes her in his arms. His friends smile derisively and leave the hall. Two years later the artist's two friends are sitting in the park, when a young couple pass pushing a perambulator containing a baby. One of them exclaims: "Look! Raymond and the dancing girl. Well, I'll be mowed!"
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1909
Choosing a Husband
MovieDec 30, 1909

Choosing a Husband

Four bachelors all want to marry Gladys. To test their fidelity …
Four bachelors all want to marry Gladys. To test their fidelity she pretends to be away, and when they come to visit, each in turn is met by her pretty younger sister. One by one they fail the test by flirting with the sister. Gladys renounces them, then is reunited with her real sweetheart, who has been abroad.
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1908
An Awful Moment
www.imdb.com
MovieDec 18, 1908

An Awful Moment

As a judge passes sentence on a man, a gypsy woman in the …
As a judge passes sentence on a man, a gypsy woman in the audience vehemently protests, and she has to be physically removed from the courtroom. Soon afterwards, the judge returns home, and enjoys some time with his wife and child. But all the while, the gypsy woman is watching him closely, and is plotting a cruel revenge.
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1891
Florence Barker
BirthNovember 1891

Florence Barker

Florence Barker was born.
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