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1929
Francis J. Grandon
PersonalJuly 1929

Francis J. Grandon

Francis J. Grandon passed away.
1920
Helen S. Grandon
Marriage1920

Helen S. Grandon

Married Helen S. Grandon.
1914
Rosemary, That's for Remembrance
en.wikipedia.org
MovieNov 2, 1914

Rosemary, That's for Remembrance

Dorinda, a mountain girl, left …
Dorinda, a mountain girl, left alone by the death of her parents, is adopted by distant relatives, Mr. and Mrs. Greer. Mrs. Greer is not overjoyed by this addition to their family, because all her mother-love and affection is given to their only son, Harvey, just finishing a term at college. Shortly after Dorinda is taken into the family, Harvey returns home and becomes interested in the girl. Dorinda goes into the garden to gather some flowers, and Harvey finds her there. While arranging the flowers, he notes a sprig of rosemary and asks her if she knows the ancient meaning of the word. She replies in the negative. So Harvey proceeds to bring out a volume of Shakespeare and turning to Hamlet, reads the lines of Ophelia in the fourth act, quoting: "There's Rosemary, that's for remembrance, Pray love, remember." Dorinda and Harvey become deeply interested in each other. A definite love affair, however, is averted. A former college friend obtains for Harvey an appointment as attaché with a diplomatic representative. The departure of Harvey to Washington is a blow to Dorinda, who cannot bear to say good-bye, so she writes him a short note. Harvey takes from the flower garden a sprig of rosemary, which he puts in a flower pot and leaves it at Dorinda's door as a parting remembrance. Dorinda cherishes the sprig of rosemary. Harvey becomes busy with his new duties and forgets his former sweetheart. One evening at an embassy ball, he becomes attracted at the first sight of a beautiful girl, one of the guests. She is also interested in Harvey, but coyly avoids him, although she encourages him by dropping a blossom from her bouquet, feeling sure that he will take up the gage thus thrown down, for seeking a further acquaintance. Little Dorinda is forgotten. The unknown coquette finally rewards Harvey with a smile, but shortly afterwards she leaves the embassy ball and Harvey despairs of ever seeing her again. He returns home for a week-end visit with his family and at church Sunday morning is astounded and delighted to see the beauty of the Washington ball room in the congregation. Then he discovers that her name is Margaret, and that she is visiting her aristocratic relatives, the Pryors, who are neighbors of the Greers. General Pryor introduces Harvey to the beautiful unknown and invites him to call at their residence. Harvey is delighted and loses no time in furthering his acquaintance with Margaret. His infatuation is noticeable, especially to Dorinda, who becomes heartbroken and downcast. A reception is given at the residence of the Pryors one evening, and Dorinda, who has not been invited, enters the grounds and peering through the window, discovers Harvey upon his knees before Margaret, making an avowal of his love. A short time after, while Margaret is in the woods sketching, she sees a picturesque old man taking a drink of water from an old-fashioned well. She proceeds to sketch him and when Harvey finds her there she shows him the sketch and asks him who that picturesque old man is. Harvey replies without shame, that it is his father. She is at first incredulous, but when she discovers that Harvey is manfully speaking the truth, her affection for him becomes lukewarm. One night Margaret is left alone with the children in the Pryor residence, and one of the little ones become seriously ill. Not knowing whom to summon for help, she sends a note to Harvey begging him to procure a doctor at once. Harvey shows the note to Dorinda, and asks her to help save the life of the child by going at once to the Pryor residence and giving such aid as she can administer until the arrival of the physician. She demurs at first, but finally rides off on horseback. On the way her steed is frightened by an automobile and she is thrown violently to the ground. When Harvey and the doctor arrive upon the scene in an automobile they find Dorinda unconscious, and carry her at once to the Pryor residence where she is restored to consciousness. Harvey is overcome by the accident and his heart at last tells him the truth. It is Dorinda whom he loves. Margaret finds them together and realizing the situation, resigns all claims to Harvey.
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The Livid Flame
MovieSep 21, 1914

The Livid Flame

Burkhart, a prominent business man, owner of a leading …
Burkhart, a prominent business man, owner of a leading mercantile establishment, and the popular candidate for governor on the Citizens' ticket, becomes impressed with the ability of James ...
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To Be Called For
MovieSep 2, 1914

To Be Called For

Silas Brown, a close-fisted country hotel-keeper in Hicksville, …
Silas Brown, a close-fisted country hotel-keeper in Hicksville, has a pretty daughter, Betty, who has a devoted suitor in Otis Perkins, a typical country town boy. The curiosity of Betty is excited by a package marked for Francis King, "to be called for." For three weeks the package remains without a claimant. It accidentally falls to the floor and breaks open, showing a magnificent ball gown. Betty has been crying her pretty eyes out because her stingy father has refused her a party dress to wear at the church fair. She wears the unclaimed ball gown and makes a hit at the fair. Francis King, who is a traveling salesman, arrives the night of the fair, and admires Betty in her handsome gown, which he recognizes as one of his samples, of a job lot. He sells the job lot to stingy old Silas at a low price because they are last year's samples. Betty confesses in tears, but King presents her with the sample dress, for which he has no further use. The jealousy of Otis is appeased while the salesman goes on to his next town.
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1913
The Adventures of Kathlyn
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MovieDec 29, 1913

The Adventures of Kathlyn

Feature version of the …
Feature version of the thirteen episode serial, _Adventures of Kathlyn, The (1913)_, released three years earlier.
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1912
The Bank Cashier
MovieSep 4, 1912

The Bank Cashier

George Graham and James Fairbanks are two young …
George Graham and James Fairbanks are two young men employed in the bank of Carson City, of which John Davis is the president. Davis has a pretty daughter, Helen, and both young men have surrendered their hearts to her, but she prefers only George, and plainly shows her preferences by deliberately snubbing James. His jealousy is aroused and he can scarcely conceal his feelings of enmity toward George, who only pities him. Mr. Davis is suddenly called away to look at a prospective purchase of land and leaves the bank in George's care. James also leaves the office before his regular quitting hour and goes to a gambling place near the bank and loses heavily, giving the winning gambler an I.O.U. for a large sum. The gambler, knowing James is an employee of the bank, also that his salary is not large enough to ever make good the I.O.U., he induces him to rob the bank. This James finally agrees to do, so they wait the time, when they will be sure of no interruption. Helen, who has made a social call on George, playfully closes the vault door on him, while he is putting away the day's cash, and finding that she cannot open the door again, she rushes out to get her father, who is now miles away from town. Frantic with fear, she drives her pony at its topmost speed, soon reaches her father, and both ride to the rescue of the imprisoned cashier, who is slowly suffocating in the vault. In the meantime James and gambler have entered the bank, opened, the vault, and are about to leave with the money when George recovers sufficiently to realize that a robbery is taking place, shoots at James, wounding his hand severely. The gambler quickly closes the vault door, leaving George to his fate. On the arrival of Helen and her father, they find the vault still locked and upon opening it find the cashier with still a spark of life left and begin the work of resuscitation. He regains his strength long enough to tell of the robbery and again swoons. Helen telephones for a doctor, who has been busy dressing the wounded hand of the thief, but quickly binding it, he starts for the bank to answer Helen's call. The two thieves fearing capture compel him at the point of a revolver to drive them to a railroad station. The banker jumps into his auto and pursues them, bringing them to bay. On his return to the bank he finds Helen, who has used her knowledge of "first aid to the injured" to good advantage, and George, both wishing they were one. The banker believing George is worthy of his only child, gives his consent.
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1911
Swords and Hearts
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MovieAug 28, 1911

Swords and Hearts

As Hugh Frazier, son of a wealthy tobacco planter, leaves to …
As Hugh Frazier, son of a wealthy tobacco planter, leaves to join his company in the Confederate Army, he becomes engaged to Irene Lambert, a beautiful, but cold and calculating girl, who promises her hand when he returns victorious. Unknown to Hugh, Jennie Baker, a little girl of the "poor white class," has fallen passionately in love with him. Her father is one of those who hate the "aristocrats," eking an existence selling berries, etc., from their little garden. Hugh, making a flying visit to Irene, is only saved from capture by Jennie's devotion, she taking his horse and donning his hat and coat, by which she leads his pursuers astray. That night, Jennie's father is killed leading an attack by Bushwhackers upon the Frazier Mansion in an attempt to secure the family wealth, but old Ben, the negro servant, anticipates their designs by taking the family strong box and burying it. The Bushwhackers, however, burn the old mansion to the ground, Hugh's father, perishing in the ruins. Hence, when Hugh returns, he finds himself homeless. Irene has turned her attentions upon a Union officer, but Jennie is still faithful. Hugh now sees her worth, and old Ben appears with the strong box which has remained hidden since the night of the attack.
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The Blind Princess and the Poet
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MovieAug 17, 1911

The Blind Princess and the Poet

The blind princess upon …
The blind princess upon consulting the soothsayer is told that upon the first kiss of unselfish love she receives she will see. All the great lords assemble to pay her court and bestow kisses in hopes of restoring her sight. There are Lords Gold, Selfish, Folly, Presumption and their ilk, but their attentions are in vain. A poor poet has humbly loved the princess, but considers himself unworthy until the Child Equality argues differently. Lord Gold in rage kills the Child Equality and the poet loses hope. However, when the princess sleeps the poor poet steals a kiss. The princess sees, and through the poet's kiss. Lord Selfish would kill the poet, but he is thwarted by justice, as the poet goes singing to his apparent death. Justice takes him to the princess' side.
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The Last Drop of Water
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MovieJul 27, 1911

The Last Drop of Water

A wagon train heading west …
A wagon train heading west across the great desert runs out of water, and is attacked by Indians. One man -- their last hope -- is sent out to find water.
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The Indian Brothers
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MovieJul 17, 1911

The Indian Brothers

A renegade Indian kills a chief who has insulted him. The chief's …
A renegade Indian kills a chief who has insulted him. The chief's brother swears vengeance and pursues the renegade, overtaking him just in time to rescue him from another tribe who are ...
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Fighting Blood
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MovieJun 29, 1911

Fighting Blood

An old soldier on the frontier, the father of a dozen children, a …
An old soldier on the frontier, the father of a dozen children, a staunch patriot himself, brings these children up with rigid military training. He conducts his household as a garrison with strict discipline, drills, etc. On the evening of the day the picture opens, the oldest boy wishes to go out to make a call on his sweetheart, but the old soldier commands the boy to stay at home. This command the boy is loath to obey, but his father, himself brought up under rigid military rule, rails at his insubordination of the boy, and threatens that if the boy goes out he goes for good. The boy does go, however, and returning finds sure enough the door barred against him. Sad and homeless he wanders, but it is fortunate he goes for the next morning he views from a distance a tribe of Indians starting out on the warpath. With this lead, he with valiant effort, secures the aid of a troop of patrolling soldiers, who rescue the boy's family and sweetheart just in time. The military training imbued by the old soldier stood in good, as it was the means of holding the Indians at bay until help arrived.
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The Primal Call
MovieJun 22, 1911

The Primal Call

A society mother, whose creditors are becoming insistent, and …
A society mother, whose creditors are becoming insistent, and wishing to keep up her ostentation, sees relief in her daughter marrying a low-charactered, pusillanimous millionaire. Hence, she persuades her daughter to accept his proposal, arguing that they must have money. The girl goes to the seashore to rest before the wedding, and there meets the mate of a tramp schooner anchored in the bay. This man appeals to her as being so different from others, a primal type of man. She indulges in that dangerous pastime of flirting with this sincere fellow and when her fiancée visits her, the seaman realizes he has been made the dupe, so he seizes the girl and is carrying her off by force. However, he suddenly reasons that she isn't worth it and recoils from her, but she now realizes that she truly loves him and begs him to take her away, so grabbing her up in one arm, and a minister who is passing by, in the other, he hustles aboard his boat, where the marriage is performed.
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Enoch Arden: Part II
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MovieJun 15, 1911

Enoch Arden: Part II

Annie remains faithful to her husband, Enoch, even …
Annie remains faithful to her husband, Enoch, even though he's been lost at sea for many years. Finally her grown children convince her to marry Philip, her former suitor. Enoch is rescued from the deserted isle where he has been stranded, and returns home. He discovers Annie's new life, and decides not to interrupt her happiness.
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Enoch Arden
www.imdb.com
MovieJun 12, 1911

Enoch Arden

Enoch Arden, a humble fisherman, marries Annie Lee. He signs …
Enoch Arden, a humble fisherman, marries Annie Lee. He signs on as a sailor to make more money to support their growing family. A storm wrecks his ship, but Enoch swims to a deserted island...
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The New Dress
MovieMay 15, 1911

The New Dress

Marta asks her husband Jose to buy her a new dress she saw …
Marta asks her husband Jose to buy her a new dress she saw at the market. On his way home, he goes with a friend to a saloon and drunkenly gives the dress to a barmaid. At home Jose tells his wife he lost the dress. She retraces his steps and finds the barmaid modeling her new dress. Faced with the truth, she goes mad.
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The Two Sides
MovieMay 1, 1911

The Two Sides

A rancher's daughter runs away and hides in the barn, where …
A rancher's daughter runs away and hides in the barn, where she falls asleep. A workman throws away a cigarette and the barn catches fire. A ranch hand sees the hay starting to burn but, ...
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The Chief's Daughter
MovieApr 10, 1911

The Chief's Daughter

Frank becomes engaged to an Indian chief's daughter. …
Frank becomes engaged to an Indian chief's daughter. Susan, Frank's first fiancée arrives from the East. The chief's daughter finds out about Susan, and confronts them both. Frank ends up losing both fiancées.
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The Spanish Gypsy
MovieMar 30, 1911

The Spanish Gypsy

Jose becomes engaged to Pepita, but still has eyes for Mariana. …
Jose becomes engaged to Pepita, but still has eyes for Mariana. He runs off with Mariana, but he is accidentally blinded, and she deserts him. Pepita discovers him wandering blindly, and forgives him.
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Was He a Coward?
MovieMar 16, 1911

Was He a Coward?

Norris gets a job as a ranch hand and falls in love with Kate, …
Norris gets a job as a ranch hand and falls in love with Kate, the rancher's daughter. The jealous foreman challenges him to a fight, but he refuses, and Kate thinks he's a coward. When smallpox hits the ranch, Norris cares for the sick at the risk of his own life, and shows Kate his true heroism.
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Comrades
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MovieMar 13, 1911

Comrades

Our introduction to these gentlemen is while they are …
Our introduction to these gentlemen is while they are enjoying their sleep in the hay. The morning paper has fallen into the hands of Mack and an article in the society news interests him. It gives the intelligence that a member of Parliament is expected to be the guest of Mr. Franklin. Jack impersonates this gentleman and gets there first. Jack in his makeup has little difficulty in making the people believe he is the M.P. and the Franklins are extreme in their efforts to entertain him, having a match with their daughter in view. Jack sees this and immediately makes up to the fair young lady. A splendid dinner is indulged in; a stroll in the park, the finest cigars, etc., fall to Jack, while poor Mack is allowed to play the part of Tantalus in the distance. Mack's chagrin is becoming overwhelming and he loses control of his good nature when Jack is shown to his bedroom leaving Mack to shiver outside. Mack revolts. So getting a ladder he climbs up to the window, and notwithstanding the objections evinced by Jack he crawls inside. Jack, however, denies him a place in the bed. At this moment the real member of Parliament arrives, and Mack hearing someone approaching sneaks under the bed. Jack is unceremoniously bounced before he has a chance to clothe himself. Mack waits until they have left the room before coming from his hiding, then he gets into the vacated bed to at least enjoy a peaceful night's sleep, while Jack is forced to pass the same time shivering below the window, clothed only in a high hat and suit of pajamas.
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The Lily of the Tenements
MovieFeb 27, 1911

The Lily of the Tenements

Here we find a youthful toiler …
Here we find a youthful toiler at a sewing machine eking the lives of her poor old mother and father. She receives a mere pittance for her labor, and this barely gives them plain food without having much for the rent of their cheerless rooms. The owner of the tenements calls for payment, and being a man of unconscionable principles offers her a means of ameliorating her condition and giving aid and ease to her and her own instead of the hopeless toil she is subjected to. The temptation is great, but her pure soul rebels against this contemptible assault and she sends him away, promising to pay the next day. What a rash promise, for she has no hopes aside from that which would be miraculous. Upon the owner's return to his office he is met by his son who is just back from college. This son is the father's one real love. He has built great hopes for him and at once makes him a member of the firm. The next day the owner goes to re-offer his proposition, feeling that by this time she has weakened in her determination. He feels assured when the girl in her hopeless condition seems compelled to make a sacrifice of herself. She, however, promises to give her decision next day. He has just left when she receives from the clothier a large order of sewing and so goes to beg for mercy and time in which to pay her rent. At the office she meets the son, who is deeply touched with the poor girl's condition and is further impressed by her innocent face. He at once decides to make an investigation, but business defers his errand until his father enters and tells him he will go, of course, with a different object in view. The poor girl at his entrance is as a lamb on the altar and he has come to claim the victim. The girl, with repugnance is about to yield, when the son with an urgent message for his father enters. He understands the situation at a glance and then and there denounces his father, bidding him good-bye forever. Hastening out he secures medical aid for his old folks and material assistance for all, promising to protect the girl for all time if she will allow, as her pitiful lot has aroused in him sincere, honest love.
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What Shall We Do with Our Old?
en.wikipedia.org
MovieFeb 13, 1911

What Shall We Do with Our Old?

An elderly carpenter is told …
An elderly carpenter is told by a doctor that his wife is seriously ill. Soon afterwards, an insensitive shop foreman lays him off from his job because of his age. Unable to find work, and with his wife's condition getting worse, he soon becomes desperate.
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A Wreath of Orange Blossoms
MovieJan 30, 1911

A Wreath of Orange Blossoms

The dressmaker's pretty …
The dressmaker's pretty daughter meets the son of her mother's patron while on an errand to deliver a dress. The son is attracted by the girl and later proposes marriage, which she, greatly flattered, accepts. This seems to be a dream to her, but its realization is in marrying the young man. Although the mother of the boy strongly objects to the marriage, still she makes the best of it, and receives the girl in her home as her daughter-in-law. The girl, coming from her humble surroundings, is dazzled by her new experience and, being rather attractive, elicits the attentions of many of the male acquaintances of her husband's family. One in particular is rather more direct than the others and loses no opportunity to place himself in her way. The simple girl is, of course, pleased with these little attentions, particularly as her husband is in a mild state of depression owing to business difficulties. The tempter knows this and becomes assiduous in his advances, which are more mildly repulsed by the wife who feels that her husband is neglecting her. At length the crash comes, and the husband is ruined. Everything lost, they are forced to move to cheaper quarters. This is decidedly irksome to the wife as the taste of luxury has, in a measure, spoiled her. She is in the throes of desperation when the tempter again appears and she becomes an easy prey, consenting to his plea for her to go away with him. Going up to her room to pack her grip, she, while gathering her effects, comes upon the wreath of orange blossoms she wore when she was married. The sight of these blossoms awakens memories of the past and impresses her with the enormity of the step she is thinking of taking. In her mind's eye she sees herself arrayed in her wedding attire, standing beside the man who loves her with an unselfish, honest love she could not hope to find in the man she would take this awful step with. This decides her and she dismisses the tempter and all thoughts of him. Meanwhile, the husband has been downtown where he gets a chance to recoup. Promise of sunshine now hovers over the little home, where a few hours before all was gloom.
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Fate's Turning
MovieJan 23, 1911

Fate's Turning

John Lawson, Jr., owing to his father's illness has borne the …
John Lawson, Jr., owing to his father's illness has borne the burden of business, and unaccustomed to the absolute responsibility, suffers a nervous breakdown. His father now well enough to look after affairs suggests he take the rest cure at a summer resort. This he decides to do, and bidding adieu to his fiancée he departs, arriving at the summer hotel the same day. In the dining hall he is attended by a pretty waitress to whom he takes a great fancy. Several days elapsing, we find him deeply smitten with the girl to the neglect of his fiancée to whom he fails to write. Escorting the girl to her home, they become betrothed, he presenting her with an engagement ring, promising to marry her immediately. This, of course, is a most dangerous step, and after a week or two, John is called hurriedly to his home as his father's health has taken a bad turn, his life being despaired of. So urgent is the message that he does not have time to see the girl before his departure. His father dies and he in the excitement of the occasion has almost forgotten the little waitress, when a letter of appeal comes from her. John now taking his father's place in society and business, reasons that an alliance with the waitress is out of the question, and writes to her to that effect. This letter is a crushing blow and she goes to the boy's home to plead with him that he may be made to realize the disastrous result of his determination. She arrives at a time when there is a "Doll Party" in progress, and comes face to face with John's fiancée who meets her with scorn. She receives very little better treatment from John himself, and so goes back to her furnished room to suffer alone for the trust she had placed in him. Sometime later she learns that he is to be married and making one last effort takes up her baby and rushes to the home, entering just as the marriage is about to take place. Her pitiable condition wins for her the sympathy of all present and a feeling of scorn is directed towards John, especially from his fiancée, who leaves at once with her mother. John, of course, has always loved the girl, and it was false pride that prevented his marrying her. Now this has dissipated in the realization of his duty, so the minister who was to perform the ceremony as originally planned, marries John and the poor unfortunate girl.
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His Trust
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MovieJan 16, 1911

His Trust

A Confederate officer is called off to war. He leaves his wife and …
A Confederate officer is called off to war. He leaves his wife and daughter in the care of George, his faithful Negro servant. After the officer is killed in an exciting battle sequence, George continues in his caring duties, faithful to his trust. Events continue to turn for the worse when invading Yankee soldiers arrive to loot and torch the widow's home. George saves the officer's daughter and battle sword by braving the flames.
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1910
White Roses
MovieDec 22, 1910

White Roses

Harry loved Betty, and vice versa, but Harry was fearfully …
Harry loved Betty, and vice versa, but Harry was fearfully bashful. No matter how he tried, he never could muster up sufficient courage to propose, despite the fact that Betty always endeavored to help him out. An idea! He writes his proposal, and invents a sentimental code of signals. The letter reads: "If you will accept me, wear red roses; if you are in doubt, the pink. If you do not love me and reject me, wear the white." He then repairs to the florist's and purchases the three shades of roses, dispatching them by messenger to his lady's residence. The messenger, however, is a dime novel fiend, and while engrossed in the thrills of a harrowing story, loses the box of flowers which are picked up by another boy. A policeman sees this boy with the box of flowers, and as he cannot give a clear account he runs him in. In the meantime, the novel reader is in despair over his loss until a modern Good Samaritan seeing the boy in tears offers to help him when he hears his tale of woe. This well-meant generosity, however, twists the romance, for he procures white roses only. Of course. Betty thinking only of Harry, wears them. Harry takes it for a hint to "beat it," and for revenge decides to marry his cook. The real box arrives at the station house, where is encountered a wise judge, aye! a modern Solomon, who after investigating the details of the case, sends the officer with the flowers to the address given on the box and letter, thus averting a heart tragedy.
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Happy Jack, a Hero
MovieDec 8, 1910

Happy Jack, a Hero

It is the evening of a reception given by Mr. and Mrs. …
It is the evening of a reception given by Mr. and Mrs. Stamford in honor of their daughter's birthday. The house is beautifully decorated and one of the features is the antique room. In this room stands a figure in a suit of armor of value. During a skylarking between the butler and maid this figure is knocked over and broken. In terror the butler, fearful of the consequences, rushes out to get someone to stand in the suit instead. Happy Jack, the rover, passing by at the time, takes the job on the promise of a good feed. There have been a couple of sneak thieves operating in society circles, and they, learning of the affair, plan to attend. In evening suits, they present themselves and while the butler is engaged with one of them, the other pilfers two invitation cards, which gain them admittance. The daughter is presented by her father with a beautiful diamond and pearl necklace. During the evening the crooks nip it, and going to the antique room to examine their spoil, espy an open safe. This is easy, and they at once begin to help themselves. This is done under the eye of Jack, whom they think a stand of armor. When their work at the safe is about complete. Jack discloses himself, holds them up and hands them into custody. You may imagine his reward now amounts to something more than a feed.
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The Song of the Wildwood Flute
MovieNov 21, 1910

The Song of the Wildwood Flute

In the opening scene is …
In the opening scene is shown the Corn Dance, which is a ceremonial performed in thanksgiving to the Great Master for his bountiful yield of crops. This dance is performed each year at the harvest. During the course of the dance, Dove Eyes, the pretty little squaw, becomes very much attracted by Gray Cloud, the brave who leads the dance. Gray Cloud is handsome and graceful, and it is small wonder that he should impress the pretty maid. Her interest in him does not go unnoticed for the brave has long been smitten with the little squaw and bashfully makes advances which are just as coyly received. To conclusively learn his fate, he goes to the old squaw to hire the love flute. This is the time-honored custom of lovers and is their form of wooing. This love flute is held in the custody of a spinster squaw and the swains hire it from her with the payment of skins to serenade the object of their affections. If the maid is enticed from the tepee by the strains of the flute, the lover is given hope. Dove Eyes appears and Gray Cloud wins his suit, and prepares for the marriage. Meanwhile, Gray Cloud's rival hires the flute to serenade Dove Eyes, but she turns a deaf ear, and so the rival goes away disgruntled and vowing vengeance. After the marriage Gray Cloud starts on a hunting trip. His rival follows at a distance determined to wreak revenge. Some distance away from the village the rival makes a move to shoot Gray Cloud, but desists, not having the cold blood to effect this purpose. He has hardly lowered the pun when he sees Gray Cloud disappear. The earth seems to have swallowed him, and it does in a measure, for when the rival runs to the spot, he finds Gray Cloud at the bottom of a bear pit. To get out unaided is impossible but his rival merely laughs derisively and leaves him to his fate. The little squaw has been pining all this while for Gray Cloud, who has now been absent for several days. Dragging herself to her father's tepee, she is taken ill on the very threshold and is carried inside. The medicine man is called, and after many prayers and incantations gives the case up. The rival hears the cries of the poor heart-crushed little squaw and all the animosity he held for Gray Cloud dissipates, so he runs to the pit and drags Gray Cloud out, helping him to Dove Eyes' side, who livens up as he is the real doctor of her ills.
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Sunshine Sue
MovieNov 14, 1910

Sunshine Sue

Sue is the sunshine of the old home; ever smiling, singing …
Sue is the sunshine of the old home; ever smiling, singing and lifting the burden from the shoulders of her parents in their declining years. She is beloved by Tom, an honest country lad, who is at a loss to know how to evince it, she too carefree to understand. He was content to sit for hours and listen to her sing and play the old songs on the parlor organ. Fate seemed to be taking good care of affairs, until one day a summer boarder pays the homestead a visit. Good looking, easy of manner and the owner of an automobile, Sue feels quite elated when he pays her some attention. She readily consents to taking a ride with him, which meets the approval of her parents, who look upon the young man as highly reputable. Ah! Here is the time-honored trick of fate; the playing with fire, so often the beginning of the end. Some miles away from the village, the auto becomes conveniently disabled, and as it is assumed it will be some time before it is righted, the young man suggests that they go to the roadhouse nearby for rest and refreshments. So well entertained is she that the time flies swiftly and when she suggests returning home she is made to believe that it is too late to return home that night. Stunned at first by this intelligence, she awakens to the full realization of the situation and excluding the young man from the room, she passes the night alone in dreadful anxiety, for she imagines the disquietude her dear old folks are suffering. And rightly, too, for at dawn we see her poor old father with faithful Tom, after an all-night vigil at the front gate sorrowfully dragging himself up to the cottage door. The young man returns to Sue in the morning and persuades her to go with him to the city, promising to marry her upon arrival. To this she consents and he installs her in a furnished room while he ostensibly goes to make arrangements for their marriage. While he is away she writes this news to her father. But, alas, the poor girl is later made to appreciate the cruel truth of the situation when the young man pretends his father objects to his marrying just at present. He, of course, reasons that she has gone too far to turn back, in fact, she fully realizes her awful predicament, for she knows how the world will regard her apparent indiscretion, so ashamed to return home, she seeks employment. In this direction she meets with the indignities often afforded the innocent by those human vultures who call themselves men. Her experience is enough to convince her of the falseness of the world she would enter, so back home she goes the same day to be received with open arms by her dear old daddy, whose searching gaze she has met with a smile.
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The Broken Doll
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MovieOct 17, 1910

The Broken Doll

Joe Stevens came out west to court fortune prospecting in the …
Joe Stevens came out west to court fortune prospecting in the mountains. He has met with more than fair success and writes his wife that she might join him as soon as she could. Wishing to surprise him, she and their child appear before him unannounced. On the day of her arrival a party of Indians from a reservation nearby visit the village to procure supplies. Among them is a little Indian girl, who, being an unfavored child, is very roughly treated by her mother. The poor tot has never known a kind word or attention. Approaching the cabin of Stevens, the little Indian beholds Joe's child playing with a very pretty doll. The doll fascinates the Indian girl and Mrs. Stevens persuades her daughter to give it to her. This act of kindness, the first the poor little child has ever experienced, so overwhelms her with gratitude that she is at a loss to know how to express it. However, her little heart pulsates with a new energy, and she leaves her new found friends all aglow with thanks. Meanwhile, the Indians have been making a round of the stores and one of them is assassinated by a drunken rowdy. The Indians, vowing vengeance, return to the reservation with the lifeless brave. A council of war is held, during which the little one appears with the doll in her arms. One of the Indians seizes this effigy of a while baby and hurls it over the bank, and when the girl climbs down and regains it she finds it hopelessly broken. Heart-crushed, the little one buries it in true Indian fashion, and as she is prostrate before the tiny pyre she hears the noise of the war dame. Hastening to the scene she realizes the grave danger of her first and only friends, and runs off to warn them. She isn't any too soon for the infuriated Indians are starting out. Joe dashes through the village arousing the inhabitants, and although the redskins have devastated and burned outlaying properly, they meet with powerful resistance at the village proper and are driven off. Everyone is loud in their praise for the little Indian child and are anxious to know her whereabouts. Alas, they will never know, for the little one, wounded during the conflict, has just strength enough to reach the little grave where she falls making it a double one, and her pure soul parts with the little body sacrificed upon the altar of gratitude.
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That Chink at Golden Gulch
MovieOct 10, 1910

That Chink at Golden Gulch

Charlie Lee, the poor chink, …
Charlie Lee, the poor chink, is the hero of this Biograph story. Having located at Golden Gulch as a laundryman, his old father is about to take his leave for his home in the Flowery Kingdom. Before going the old man warns his son to cherish his sacred queue, for should he lose that he would be an outcast and disbarred from returning to his country, which every Chinaman who leaves, looks forward to doing. His father gone, the chink feels very much alone and low spirited, for though a saffron-skinned Pagan, his soul is white and real red blood pulsates his heart. He takes up a basket of laundry work to deliver and on the road is made to feel the result of two thousand years of civilization, for while passing a gang of cowboys, they pull his pigtail, threaten to cut it off, and roughly handle him until rescued by Bud Miller and his sweetheart, Miss Dean. For this intervention the chink is deeply grateful, and when Gentleman Jack, the dandy, tries to cut Bud Miller out in Miss Mean's affection, Charlie, the chink, keeps his eyes open. Through this the Dandy and Bud come to blows, but are separated by the boys. However, the chink hears the dandy threaten to do Bud at first meeting. The chink resolves to save his friend at any cost. The excitement at the Gulch is the repeated hold-ups of the registered mail carrier, and the effectual evasion of capture of the robber. A reward of $5,000 for his capture is posted, and the attitude of the dandy towards the notice arouses the chink's suspicion, hence he follows him like a shadow. His efforts prove fruitful, for he is a witness to the dandy's operations, who, disguising himself, makes his way to a lonely spot in the road and holds up the mail carrier. At a distance he views the dandy change his disguise and lay out on the ground to rest and gloat over his success. Here stands the poor chink apparently helpless. He is unarmed and with nothing with which to secure his captive. There, lays the dandy with his hands clasped above his head. All that is needed is a hit of rope. A thought strikes the chink, but what a sacrifice it means. A sacrifice which will make him forever an outcast. There is no other way, so whipping out a knife, he with one slash cuts off the sacred queue and binds the dandy's hands so quickly that he is taken into the camp before he knows what has occurred. After the excitement of his deed is over, the poor Chinaman then realizes what his condition really is. The reward he receives is made use of in an unlooked-for way. When the sweethearts go to his shack they find a note which reads: "Missie Dean alsame Bud Miller too. Charlie Lee wishee much glad you two when alsame one. Hope take money for blidel plesent. Goodby. Charlie Lee went away." With the note is the bag containing the $5,000, but the chink could not be found.
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Examination Day at School
MovieSep 29, 1910

Examination Day at School

You can catch more flies with …
You can catch more flies with honey than will gall, and you rule easier by kindness than by tyranny. This fact is shown in this Biograph pastoral, which indeed might prove a lesson to educators. The teacher to thoroughly impart knowledge must win the love of his pupil, otherwise his efforts are in vain. The old village schoolmaster is a lovable soul, and you can see the love his scholars bear him written on their smiling countenances as they scamper on to school. He in turn comes trudging along, his face lit up in the pleasant anticipation of soon being in the midst of his loved ones. All hail him joyously at his entrance and there are the little remembrance, an apple from one, a pear from another, a bouquet from another, etc. The opening exercises begin and the odious announcement that the county examiner will be there arrives outside and the old teacher goes to meet and escort him into the classroom. While he is absent Jimmy the village "cutup," draws a caricature of the examiner on the blackboard. This so incenses this irascible personage that he immediately dismisses the class for the morning and when they have gone discharges the poor old schoolmaster. What a blow. He goes home almost heartbroken at the thought of losing the association of his dear little flock. Jimmy later becomes truly contrite for what he did, and with the scholars at his heels runs off to the teacher's home to beg his pardon. Here they learn what woe their lark has caused, their dear old teacher has gone to the Commissioners' office and engages a new teacher whom he enjoins to lambaste these youngsters into submission. With what success we shall see. The scholars unanimously plan a revolt and no sooner has the new instructor turned his back than he receives a fusillade of fruit and vegetables. Well, they soon whip him and he rushes off to the Commissioners' to tender his resignation. The children follow and insist upon the reinstatement of their old teacher. Their plea is granted, so they hurry off to the teacher's home and fairly carry him back to the schoolhouse. The class again in session, the old teacher gives thanks, writing on the blackboard, "Praise God from whom all blessings flow," the children singing as he writes.
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The Oath and the Man
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MovieSep 22, 1910

The Oath and the Man

Before the revolution in France the nobility exercised a most …
Before the revolution in France the nobility exercised a most despotic rule over the peasants, subjecting them to abject slavery. Not only did they suffer pecuniary oppression, but their humble households were invaded and defiled by the noble profligates. Henri Provost, a perfumer, receives a call from his landlord in quest of some perfume. During his visit this nobleman is attracted by Henri's pretty young wife. Her beauty so enthralls him that he, during her husband's absence, exercises his presumed rights, and invites, or rather commands her to attend his house fete. Here he dresses her in finery and promises to make a great lady of her, so that when her husband, who finding whither she had gone, bursts into the palace, she denies him. The heartbroken perfumer at first would return to the palace and in vengeance murder both his wife and the nobleman, but the old priest stays him, by showing him the crucifix, the emblem of Christian charity and making him swear he would never kill them. Indicating that vengeance belonged to God. Henri takes this oath and lives up to it. Some time later the peasants chafing under aristocratic tyranny revolt, with the perfumer a leader. The revolutionists invade the home of the nobleman, the occupants of which flee in panic. The nobleman himself, with the perfumer's wife, who is still with him, make their way to her former home, which she imagines is deserted. The perfumer enters, and upon meeting the guilty pair, sees his chance to wreak vengeance. He is about to run them through when the old priest again appears and shows him the crucifix, reminding him of his oath. He then waves back the mob, who haven't seen the nobleman, with the exclamation, "This is my wife." The mob dismissed, he takes the couple to an inner room where they exchange their finery for peasant's attire. Thus they leave to take their chances of evading intemperate revolutionists who are parading outside, devastating everything and destroying everybody aristocratic. What a bitter lesson she has been taught. Her covetousness has brought her only shame, terror, poverty and isolation.
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Wilful Peggy
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MovieAug 25, 1910

Wilful Peggy

Peggy is a high-spirited young woman from a poor family. …
Peggy is a high-spirited young woman from a poor family. One day she catches the eye of a wealthy lord, who proposes marriage and wants to introduce her into his social circle. But ...
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The Usurer
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MovieAug 15, 1910

The Usurer

A wealthy, callous moneylender finds a terrifying way to learn …
A wealthy, callous moneylender finds a terrifying way to learn about money's limitations.
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The House with Closed Shutters
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MovieAug 8, 1910

The House with Closed Shutters

During the Civil War a young …
During the Civil War a young soldier loses his nerve in battle and runs away to his home to hide; his sister puts on his uniform, takes her brother's place in the battle, and is killed. ...
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An Arcadian Maid
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MovieAug 1, 1910

An Arcadian Maid

A young girl looking for work, is hired by a farmer's wife to …
A young girl looking for work, is hired by a farmer's wife to work as a maid. A smooth talking peddler comes by the farm, and flirts with the young maid. He gives the naive girl an engagement ring and promises to marry her. When the peddler runs up some gambling debts, he visits the maid again and tells her they cannot marry until he has enough money to pay off his debt. While the farmer and his wife are asleep, the maid foolishly steals their money. The peddler takes the money and leaves on a train to get out of town. Overcome with guilt, the young maid runs away from the farm. Meanwhile the peddler gets into a fight and is thrown off the train. The maid stumbles upon him by the railroad tracks. She finds the money on the peddler and returns it to the farm couple before they even knew it was missing.
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The Call to Arms
MovieJul 25, 1910

The Call to Arms

When the Feudal Lord and his bride were visited by their …
When the Feudal Lord and his bride were visited by their cousin at a time when this Lord was presenting to his bride the family heirloom the Great Ruby of Irskaat, the cousin coveted it, and was determined to secure it. The Lord receives a call to arms, and in this the cousin sees a way to achieve his design. The Lord, however, appreciating the danger of leaving this valuable jewel unguarded, buries it in a secluded part of the grounds. His soldiers now assembled, he departs, leaving his wife to the care of his trusted servants. No sooner had he left than the cousin returns with the subterfuge that he will stay at the palace guarding the wife until the Lord's return. This the wife appreciates, believing his tender well meant. Surreptitiously he rids the palace of the servants, placing his own in their stead. The poor woman is now in the absolute power of this despicable villain. By entreaties and threats he tries to make her divulge the whereabouts of the ruby, but he finds her adamant. Not wishing to use violence, he will pursue another course, flattery and wine. While he gets the wine, the wife writes a note and dispatches her page, whom she discovers in the garden beneath her window, to her husband with it. Off the page goes on a mad dash only to become exhausted before the end of the journey. Meeting a band of gypsies they give the boy refreshments. The drink induces sleep and when the boy awakes he finds several hours have elapsed. Arriving at the Lord's tent, he delivers the missive and the Lord leaps into the saddle and dashes toward the palace. During the time of this wild ride, a horrible thing has happened at the palace. In her endeavor to keep the traitorous cousin at bay the wife has accidentally fallen headlong from one of the parapets of the palace to the walk below. Out rushes the cousin, only to find that the fall resulted fatally. He carries her inanimate form in, and now he fully realizes the enormity of his deed and falls cowering at the foot of the altar in the little chapel. At this moment the Lord dashes up. Entering, he finds his wife cold in death. Stunned for a moment, he rushes into the next room, where the cousin grovels, with one object in mind, vengeance.
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A Midnight Cupid
MovieJul 7, 1910

A Midnight Cupid

Perry Dudley, a young man of wealth and position, is the …
Perry Dudley, a young man of wealth and position, is the center of attraction with the matchmaking mothers, as he is considered the season's best catch. The daughters are by no means backward. In obtruding themselves to his notice. In fact, he is so annoyed and bored by this bevy of fawning females that his life becomes one of ennui. He longs for a change where people are less superficial. While fulfilling one of his social obligations his house is entered by a poor unfortunate tramp, a veritable soldier of misfortune. The poor fellow has a letter in his pocket from friends in his native village from whence he left when but a small boy. The missive asks that he return and he will be taken care of. He is inclined to go, but cannot make the trip on an empty stomach, so his visit to the Dudley mansion is in quest of food. He finds no one at home, and espying a decanter of wine on the table, in lieu of food, takes a drink. The wine has both an intoxicating and soporific effect, and when Perry returns he finds his nocturnal visitor on the floor in a profound bacchanalian slumber. As he lifts him to a chair Perry sees the letter, which he reads. What a chance. He decides at once to disguise himself and go to the country in the tramp's place, assuming that no one would recognize the deception. Placing a ten-dollar bill in the tramp's pocket instead of the letter, he instructs his valet and butler to take the sleeping tramp out and lay him on a bench in the park. Off Perry goes to present himself as the long-lost native, and has little trouble in convincing the old tanner that he is the personage to whom the letter is addressed. Of course, he is welcomed, but one thing he didn't bargain for was work on the farm; still he must endure it. Another thing he didn't bargain for, but is willing to endure, is the companionship of farmer's pretty daughter. It is a case of love on both sides. Meanwhile, the tramp awakening and finding the money, resolves to go back to his old home. His arrival is uneventful, as no one will believe him until he shows the farmer several marks or scars of identification as proof, hence the farmer chases Perry off and locks the daughter in her room. But, pshaw! As they appreciate the fact that love has ever given locksmiths the merry ha ha, they won't let a little thing like that break their romance, so they elope. When they arrive at Perry's mansion the girl is amazed, but is reassured by the presence of a minister, who makes them one just as the old father, who has followed with a neighbor, enters. He not only makes the best of the situation, but considers himself the most fortunate father in Christendom with his daughter making such a match.
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A Child of the Ghetto
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MovieJun 6, 1910

A Child of the Ghetto

After her mother's death, …
After her mother's death, Ruth struggles to support herself as a seamstress. While Ruth delivers shirts to the factory owner, the owner's son steals some money and Ruth is accused of the crime. She flees the ghetto of New York's Lower East Side and hides in the country where a young farmer takes her in and they fall in love.
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The Impalement
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MovieMay 30, 1910

The Impalement

Walter Avery is blessed with a most dutiful and loving wife, whose …
Walter Avery is blessed with a most dutiful and loving wife, whose every endeavor and thought is to make him happy, but he being a man of the world, finds domestic life dull, and his wife's attentions boring. Hence, it is with eagerness that he accepts invitations to the different social functions. Accompanied by his wife, he attends a social gathering and there meets a young dancing girl, society's favorite entertainer. He is immediately obsessed with an infatuation for the girl, and it is evident that his feelings are reciprocated. Mrs. Avery's suspicions are aroused and she accuses him of undue attentions toward the dancer. He, of course, denies her accusations and cajoles her into believing that his thoughts are always only for her. Nevertheless, the time comes when she sees positive proof of his perfidy in a letter to him from the girl inviting him to attend a dinner at her house given in his honor, hoping he will not fail to grace the occasion. When he is about to leave for the dancer's home, Mrs. Avery picks up a bottle of poison, threatening to take her life if he goes. Regarding this threat merely a jealous woman's trick to keep him home, he not only treats it with derision, but pours the contents of the bottle into a goblet, remarking that it would be more convenient to take it that way, and off he goes. When he is gone the true aspect of the situation dawns on her. She realizes for the first time what a despicable wretch he is, and not worth the effort to save him, so she dashes the glass with its contents to the floor. However, the strain of the ordeal through which she has passed proves too much for her, and she falls in a swoon to the floor. Meanwhile, Avery has reached the home of the dancer, and is toasted at his entrance. By strange coincidence, the glass handed to him is identical with the one he handed his wife. He at once becomes conscience-stricken that his wife may have carried out her threat. Rushing back to his home he finds his wife in a swoon, but he thinks her dead. Dead, and he caused it! At this moment he becomes a veritable maniac. Dashing madly out of the house, he re-enters the dancer's home like a fiend. The guests are thrown into a panic as he shrieks, "I killed my wife! I killed my wife!" and falls across the table dead, struck down by the relentless avenger of injured virtue.
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Ramona
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MovieMay 23, 1910

Ramona

Ramona is a little orphan of the great Spanish household of …
Ramona is a little orphan of the great Spanish household of Moreno. Alessandro, the Indian, arrives at the Camulos ranch with his sheep-shearers, showing his first meeting with Ramona. There is at once a feeling of interest noticeable between them which ripens into love. This Senora Moreno, her foster mother, endeavors to crush, with poor success, until she forces a separation by exiling Alessandro from the ranch. He goes back to his native village to find the white men devastating the place and scattering his people. The Senora, meanwhile, has told Ramona that she herself has Indian blood, which induces her to renounce her present world and go to Alessandro. They are married and he finds still a little shelter left from the wreckage. Here they live until the whites again appear and drive them off, claiming the land. From place to place they journey, only to be driven further until finally death comes to Alessandro just as aid comes in the person of Felipe, the Senora's son, who takes Ramona back to Camulos.
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An Affair of Hearts
MovieMay 19, 1910

An Affair of Hearts

In this comedy we are introduced to the impulsive hearted …
In this comedy we are introduced to the impulsive hearted Frenchman. For him to see a pretty woman is to love her, heedless of the disaster his attendant persistence may incur, as it is that when Mons. Borni espies the fair unknown he is anxious to become her abject slave. She, however, resents his independence and in his delection he writes to his dear friend, Mons. Renay, the following: "My dear Renay, I love, I worship a lady I do not know. From no one can I find out who she is. I have just seen her. I must know her and make her my wife. What shall I do? My dear friend. I crave your help. Gaston Borni." Mons. Renay hies to his dear friend's assistance and the first sight they get of the fair lady is as she speeds through the park in her auto. She is alone, and they engage a small runabout to follow her. Borni, of course, paying for it. As there is but one front seat, Renay takes this, while the lovestruck Borni is forced to occupy the footman's chair, but what cares he, so long as it will take him into the presence of his charmer? They follow her auto until it arrives at the lady's home, which she enters hurriedly. A policeman is standing by, and they, that is, Borni, pay him to divulge the name of the fair goddess, but after pocketing the liberal bribe he tells them he is very sorry to say he doesn't know her. But they reason faint heart ne'er won fair lady, so they persist, and the next time they encounter her riding horseback. Here Mons. Renay woos her on his own account, his pervious heart having also been touched. Her horse enable her to distance them, but a bicycle rider appears and they procure the wheel. Borni again paying the fee, but Renay decamps on it. This endeavor also proves a failure, and meeting a hunter in the woods they, Borni, of course, purchase his guns in a duel. This procedure is not as acceptable as they imagine, for they realize it takes a certain amount of nerve to stand up as a target, even though you yourself may have a human target at your disposal. Well, while they parley, the lady views with amusement their antics from her veranda, and she decides it is now time to put a stop to their imbecility, so dispatching her maid to the field of honor, the valorous lovers are invited to appear at the house. They both declare their undying love for the fair unknown; they would fight for her; they would lay down their lives for her, but when her sturdy robust husband appears, they find they have pressing engagements elsewhere.
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Love Among the Roses
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MovieMay 9, 1910

Love Among the Roses

In the Kingdom of Never-Never Land there live a great Lord …
In the Kingdom of Never-Never Land there live a great Lord and Lady, each presiding over their own domain. This great Lord goes for a stroll through his estate and coming to the border of his own land he is struck by the entrancing beauty of the contiguous estate, so like his own, that the inclination to intrude is irresistible. His peregrination is halted by the appearance of the great Lady, who is indeed as fair as the flowers that clothe her land. He introduces himself and invites her to stroll with him in his gardens. She is in like manner entranced by the beauty of his possessions. How alike in beauty are they; a veritable fairyland. If they were only one, for it seems they should be. This thought is mutual, and the Lord proposes a way, a marriage, and so a betrothal of convenience ensues. They know nothing of love and so are content in the anticipation of being Lord and Lady of all Never-Never Land. Little do they dream of the subtle workings of fate, which is, of course, the natural egotism of humankind, but, nevertheless, the lines are being drawn, for as we have viewed the paradisaical side of life, we now go to the homely side, by visiting the sad house in Never-Never Land. Here we find sorrow, toiling and want, and yet we find as in the other a betrothal of convenience between the poor little lace-maker and the humble gardener. They reason that their lot may be more bountiful by joining their meager fortunes. The gardener secures a position in the gardens of the Lady and the lace-maker goes out to find purchasers of her handiwork. The Lord meets the pretty lace-maker and is attracted by her beauty, for he learns for the first time what love is. The Lady meets the gardener and is struck by his rugged, manly beauty and herculean strength, so different from the Lord, her neighbor. She also realizes the power of love, for her inclination to be near the gardener is irresistible. Despite the apparent misalliance in such a step, the Lady confesses she can only be happy with the humble gardener. This intelligence the Lord receives with ill-concealed delight, as it leaves him free to marry the pretty lace-maker.
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The Gold Seekers
MovieMay 2, 1910

The Gold Seekers

The maxim, "'Tis darkest just before dawn," was certainly …
The maxim, "'Tis darkest just before dawn," was certainly verified in the case of the despairing prospector who is the subject of this Biograph story. All his searching for the coveted yellow ore has been fruitless, and he starts out to make his last effort to find pay dirt. The privations he has suffered do not affect him as much as the hardships endured by his patient wife with their little child, a boy of ten years. To see them subjected to hunger and exposure almost drives him mas, and this final effort is almost maniacal. As usual, his endeavors seem to be in vain, until in a fit of rage he hurls his pick away from him and sinks despairingly on the ground. Here he sits hopeless, when he sees something shining in the earth that the pick's point had upturned when he hurled it from him. He is dazed, and can scarcely believe his sight. However, a pan of the dirt taken to the brook and washed proves he has at last struck pay dirt. Wild with joy, he rushes to his camp to give the news to his wife. She reminds him of the importance of filing his claim at once, and to this end the three, man, wife and child, go back to the place and he stakes the claim, guarding it, while the wife hurries to the agent's office to file it, she taking the little boy with her. Two mountain reprobates from a distance see the staking of the claim, and knowing that the first one filing the claim may secure it, try to reach the agent before her, but as she is on horseback and they on foot, she reaches there first. When she arrives she finds the office not yet open and a line of prospectors awaiting the agent's arrival. The two scoundrels now scheme to get the wife's place in the line, and to effect this they play upon her sympathy by getting an unconscionable old woman to feign illness and ask to be assisted to her home. This the wife does, the scoundrels following and locking her in a room with her little boy. They go back to the agent to secure his recognition of their claim. After futile efforts to burst the door, the wife lets the baby through the transom on a rope, telling him to run for help. This the little fellow manfully does, and after a time engages the attention of a couple of ranchers, who release the poor woman, rushing her to the land agent's office just as he is about to sign the claim of the scoundrels. The agent listens to the woman's story, backed up by the ranchers and the baby, and signs the claim, handing it to her, at the same time pushing a pistol in the scoundrels' faces with the injunction, "Now, git," and they very wisely "got."
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The Love of Lady Irma
MovieMar 17, 1910

The Love of Lady Irma

Lady Irma is the wife of a …
Lady Irma is the wife of a handsome man who is the object of admiration of all the women, and wherever he appears they flock about him to such an extent that the wife, though assuming that she is not jealous, is afraid that their excessive adulation may turn his head and she will he forgotten. She asks herself if she can hold his love. She, with candor, realizes that she is not more beautiful than most of them, and maybe not as attractive as some. Here she is tortured by fears, although he is devoted to her. Protestations on his part serve but little to ease her mind when she sees him in the midst of a throng of admiring women, and her perturbation is ill-concealed. To her best friend she is about to write her fears, and ask advice, when an idea occurs to her. If he was not so handsome they would possibly not so thoroughly monopolize his attentions. If he could only meet with some disfiguring accident, at this point of her soliloquy a horrible plan presents itself to her mind and she impetuously puts it into effect, engaging the services of a couple of thugs to waylay her husband and sear his face in a manner to disfigure his beauty. For this she pays them a considerable sum. The deed is perpetrated and the affair is enveloped in mystery, as there appeared to be no plain reason for the assault. However, the wounds heal, but he is brutally disfigured for life. It is now that Lady Irma feels the awful weight of remorse, which is not even lightened by the contemptuous attitude of the women at his appearance. This is not the worst torment, for the thugs, appreciating the hold they have on her, use a threat to expose her as a means to extort more money. During one of their visits they are surprised by the husband, who throws them bodily out of the house. Reasoning that he will sooner or later learn the truth, she confesses. He is at first amazed, but upon learning what had induced her step, he forgives her.
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In Old California
MovieMar 10, 1910

In Old California

No land nor period was more given to romance than the Spanish …
No land nor period was more given to romance than the Spanish American in the early part of the 19th century. The influence of the warm constant sun, without excessive amenity was conducive to lethargy and lethargy is the seed of romance. The dreamer is a romancer. This Biograph story starts some time before Mexican independence was proclaimed in California, which occurred in 1822. Perdita Arguello, the pretty Spanish senorita is beloved by Jose Manuella, a wealthy young Spaniard, who migrated to the new world in search of adventure. A man of qualities, he surrenders claim upon the girl when he finds her heart is given to Pedro Cortes, a handsome troubadour of the village. Cortes is just the sort of fellow to impress a thoughtless and unsophisticated girl with his gentle persuasive manner together with his talent as a musician. Of poetic temperament, she yields to his plan and marries him. But what a calamity! Twenty years later we see the result of her folly. Cortes proved to be a worthless dipsomaniac and reprobate. Spending his time and money she earns at the tavern. The most unfortunate feature is that they have a son, now nearly 19 years old. Perdita realizes that the environs and example of the father are not favorable to the boy's well-being, hence she resolves to save him. It is at a time when Baja and Alta California are in conflict, and Manuella, Perdita's former lover, is now Governor. So she appeals to him to provide a future for their son. The Governor takes the boy into his own company. But is there any wonder that the son of such a dog as Cortes should prove himself to be a despicable whelp? He is not long in the service when the blood of his father asserts itself. Drunkenness is one of the first offenses. Next theft of the meanest order, that of robbing his sleeping comrades-in-arms. Perdita has dispatched a letter of thanks to the Governor, which he is reading as the drunken boy is brought before him. The tone of the letter induces Manuella to be easy on the boy that she might live in ignorance of his real nature. However, later she writes that she is dying and believing her son has made a name for himself, she asks to be allowed to see him before she dies. As the Governor reads this letter the boy is brought before him, having been caught for thieving. Manuella is thoroughly disgusted with the boy, but in order to have his mother die happy, he decorates him, making him appear before her as a hero. When she breathes her last the medals are torn his breast and he is sent to prison where the punishment he justly deserves is inflicted. In this subject are shown a series of most beautiful scenes of Southern California, which are photographically perfect.
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The Thread of Destiny
MovieMar 7, 1910

The Thread of Destiny

Little Myrtle, the orphan girl …
Little Myrtle, the orphan girl of San Gabriel, stands at the window of her cabin contemplating the beautiful sun before her; the valley out between the hills bedecked by the hand of Flora, iridescent in the morning light, a veritable Iris. Her pure soul goes out in love to the trees, the flowers and the sun, which is responded in the exhilaration of their perfume. Yet she is obsessed with an insatiable yearning. An orphan, she does not know paternal love; her pure, tender heart does not concur with those around her, for the village is made up of a people abjectly material. There is but one to whom she can evince her generous, affectionate nature, the wife of the innkeeper, who is ill. Each morning she gathers flowers and brings them to her. On this morning we see her flower-laden, making her way to the inn. On the road she meets a Mexican stranger, Estrada. Their hands touch while he assists her in recovering some of the flowers she has dropped. She experiences a thrill, such as she had never felt before, and yet she doesn't know why. However, her heart seems lighter, the world brighter, as she continues on to the inn to cheer and comfort the suffering woman. As she is about to leave, she is insulted with the advances of Gus Walters, a drunken tough. He is about to seize her when Estrada enters and rescues her from the peril, seeing her safely out of the place. Later, Estrada is induced to take a hand in a poker game, which is really a subterfuge to start a quarrel. He is accused of cheating, and they determine to lynch him. Seeing the chances extremely against him, he picks up a chair, and whirling it around him, makes his way to the door. He dashes down the road, and by climbing a tree, manages to throw his pursuers off his trail. In detour he finally comes to a cabin, which he enters as refuge, to find it the home of .Myrtle. Her wit saves him. She makes him bind her hands and feet, disarrange the place, and then hide under a pile of stuff. The appearances are convincing to the story she tells the posse of being robbed by Estrada, who had proceeded on out of reach. They are satisfied that the Mexican has eluded them and so search no further, going back to the inn. Gus hangs back and returns to Myrtle's cabin to wreak revenge, thinking she is unprotected, but he is mistaken, of course, and being off guard, he is easily overpowered and bound. He is afforded the felicity of witnessing Myrtle and Estrada plight their troth, and leave for the mission chapel to be married. Still they are charitable, for before they leave they place in Gus' mouth a cigarette and light it for him that his hours of bondage might not hang heavy. Off they go to the mission where they are bound for life in holy marriage. Gus, meanwhile, has freed himself and rushing hack to the inn tells of the girl's ruse. As they look from the window they see Myrtle and Estrada leaving the priest and strolling down the road as the twilight bells of the Angelus toll. This awakens the boys to their better selves and they exclaim. "Let 'em go, Gus, the drinks are on you."
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Taming a Husband
MovieFeb 24, 1910

Taming a Husband

Lady Margaret loved her husband with youthful impetuosity and …
Lady Margaret loved her husband with youthful impetuosity and while he deeply loved her, still so engrossed was he with social and business matters that he was often guilty of seeming indifference. She believed that his love had grown cold, and in desperation confides her fears to her best friend, Lady Clarissa, inviting her to visit and advise her. Lady Clarissa arrives and at once hits upon a plan. She dresses herself in male attire, and assumes the role of a lover, sure that she will tame Margaret's husband and bring him to his sense of duty. Clarissa, as a young gallant, makes quite an impression upon the male companions of the husband and finds her position at times rather embarrassing, especially when invited to join their drinking and smoking fests. Hence she realizes she will put her scheme into operation at once. To this end she blatantly flirts with Lady Margaret. Several times they are apparently surprised together by the husband. But as it is during the entertainment of a house full of guests, he has small chance of resenting the insult. However, he finally catches the young unknown on his knees before his wife. This is too much and a challenge is the outcome. Seconds are selected and the time set. The seconds for the masquerading Clarissa try to dissuade their "man" from meeting his adversary, stating mat the other man has such an advantage over him, he being such a big fellow. This has no effect, as Clarissa exclaims: "I will fight him, sir, though he were as tall as a tower." The seconds leave, despairing for their friend, as it seems suicidal. They return again with another plea and find their "man" in the arms of the wife. This enrages them, and having witnessed his perfidy, refuse to act, reasoning that the field of honor is too good; he should be slain on the spot. They convey to the husband their impression and the cause of it, which throws him into a frenzy of fury. Into the house they go with swords in hand, bent on instantly dispatching the vile wretch. Lady Clarissa sees them coming and locks the door, which she realizes will prove but a slight obstruction to the raging husband, so she, frightened, dons her conventional habiliments, and when the door yields to their battering, in rushes the husband to learn the truth of the situation and appreciate the guilt of his own negligence.
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The Dancing Girl of Butte
MovieJan 6, 1910

The Dancing Girl of Butte

Bella is a dancer in a music …
Bella is a dancer in a music ball at Butte. She is pretty, light-hearted, and yet possessed of a refined nature that commands a respect not looked for in such surroundings. Strolling through the city park one morning, she steps on an uneven spot in the path and turns her ankle. Her cry of pain brings to her aid Howard Raymond, who assists her to her home. Bella's demure manner and pretty face appeal to Howard, and he realizes it is a case of love at first sight. Bella, herself, is deeply impressed with the young man the accident has caused her to meet. However, she realizes her position and dissipates all serious thoughts on the matter. Howard, who is a newspaper artist and an enthusiast in all respects, tells his fellow artists of his love for the unknown girl. They, being used to his impetuousness, simply smile. On this occasion he is in earnest, and hastening back to the girl's house, he surprises her in her dance hall attire. This she explains by making him believe that she is a member of a traveling dramatic company. Well, it is the old story. The accident was simply a trick of Cupid to bring two hearts together, and they are betrothed. They exchange photographs, and when he shows her picture to his friends they recognize in it the dancing girl. So they go to the girl and ask her to give him up. This she is loath to do, admitting that while she has danced at the hall, the work was detestable. Finding her unwilling to repulse his suit, they tell Howard of her calling, which he does not believe, and knocks one of them down for what he regards an insult. The girl, however, in honesty enters and admit the truth, taking the artist to the place where she works. What a blow to the poor fellow, and he turns from her with a crushed heart. Cut to the quick by his repulsion, she tells him that although she has been forced to earn a living in this fusion, she is through with it all, and while her soul is pure she will leave it. The sincerity of her tone softens the young man, and turning, he takes her in his arms. His friends smile derisively and leave the hall. Two years later the artist's two friends are sitting in the park, when a young couple pass pushing a perambulator containing a baby. One of them exclaims: "Look! Raymond and the dancing girl. Well, I'll be mowed!"
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1909
Two Women and a Man
MovieNov 15, 1909

Two Women and a Man

John Randolph was truly a happy man when he brought Molly …
John Randolph was truly a happy man when he brought Molly as his wife to the humble little home in the village. John was a bright, ambitious young man, who sought to improve their condition in life. It is true he worked hard, but it grieved him to see his wife toiling at her arduous household duties. His fondest dream was to have his dear wife mistress of her home, with those around her to do the labors. At length his dream is realized. Having studied the stock market, he becomes successful therein, and they remove to New York, where they occupy a palatial home. Alas, how much better off would they have been in their simple country house. But one never can tell. It is the old story, earned success brings happiness, easy money, woe. In New York success attends his every move, and he is soon a very rich man, and a power in the stock market. It is now that domesticity chafes and he seeks recreation outside his own home, mingling with a set in which his wife would be entirely out of place. While at a Bohemian gathering, he becomes smitten with a music hall singer. After this it is all for her, and neglect for his wife. He showers bouquets and presents upon her, the most costly being a magnificent diamond and pearl collar. This neglect is felt by the wife and a separation and divorce is the outcome, with a settlement on his discarded wife. Free from further obligations in that direction, he marries the singer. This step is ominous for he at once reaches the turning point. Beaten in the market, his friends turn from him. His only chance is to secure his second wife's jewels, all his presents, with which to start anew. Would she yield them? Would she make one tithe the sacrifice poor Molly made? Not much. She deserts him coldly. What a lesson is here depicted. Ruined, friendless, he wanders back to the old village home, which is as he left it, and finds rest again, where he found rest before, in the old-fashioned rocker.
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