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Actor

Fred Church

  • Oct 17, 1889 - Jan 07, 1983 (age 93)
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1983
Fred Church
Personal1983

Fred Church

Fred Church passed away.
1935
Defying the Law
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MovieMar 2, 1935

Defying the Law

A Border Patrol agent enlists the help of two cowboys in trying …
A Border Patrol agent enlists the help of two cowboys in trying to solve a string of robberies.
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1934
Border Guns
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MovieFeb 1, 1934

Border Guns

A cowboy drifts into an Arizona border town and finds …
A cowboy drifts into an Arizona border town and finds himself in the middle of a fight between the townspeople and a Mexican bandit gang that has been terrorizing the territory.
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1930
The Apache Kid's Escape
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MovieNov 22, 1930

The Apache Kid's Escape

Staying one step ahead of …
Staying one step ahead of the law, the Apache Kid helps out a cowboy in trouble.
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1925
The Lost Express
MovieJul 1, 1925

The Lost Express

Kidnapping and marital reconciliation drive this …
Kidnapping and marital reconciliation drive this action film set on a millionaire's private train.
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1924
Chalk Marks
MovieSep 14, 1924

Chalk Marks

Young Herbert Thompson, wanting to attain wealth and social …
Young Herbert Thompson, wanting to attain wealth and social status, marries Ann Morton, who comes from a rich and prominent family, throwing over pretty young Angelina Kilboure, who really loves him. Years later Herbert has become the local District Attorney and has two children, Bert and Virginia. One night Bert, a patron at a seedy roadhouse, defends his sister's honor from a ruffian and winds up killing the man. Angelina persuades Herbert to leave his post as D.A. to defend his son in his murder trial. Herbert wins the case, but it turns out to have unexpected consequences.
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1919
The Son-of-a-Gun
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MovieFeb 2, 1919

The Son-of-a-Gun

After Bill, a wild man known as the Son-of-a-Gun, disrupts May's …
After Bill, a wild man known as the Son-of-a-Gun, disrupts May's party, he is kicked out of town and told he will be shot if he returns. In the next County he finds May's young brother being cheated at poker. Recovering the money the boy lost, he brings him home. But before the boy can explain, his father shoots Bill.
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1917
Madame Du Barry
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MovieDec 30, 1917

Madame Du Barry

Jeanette (Theda Bara), unknown in Paris but of great beauty and …
Jeanette (Theda Bara), unknown in Paris but of great beauty and wit, attracts the attention of Louis XV (Charles Clary) who expresses a desire to meet her to Jean Du Barry (Herschel Mayall)...
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The Clever Mrs. Carfax
en.wikipedia.org
MovieNov 5, 1917

The Clever Mrs. Carfax

Newspaper publisher Temple …
Newspaper publisher Temple Trask, who answers the "Letters to the Lovelorn" column under the nom-de-plume "Mrs. Carfax," becomes the hit of his college reunion when he revives his female ...
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Southern Justice
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MovieMay 28, 1917

Southern Justice

Southern Justice released.
1916
The End of the Rainbow
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MovieOct 30, 1916

The End of the Rainbow

The End of the Rainbow released.
A Romance of Billy Goat Hill
MovieOct 9, 1916

A Romance of Billy Goat Hill

A Romance of Billy Goat Hill released.
The Secret of the Swamp
www.imdb.com
MovieJul 31, 1916

The Secret of the Swamp

The Secret of the Swamp is …
The Secret of the Swamp is a 1916 American drama film written and directed by Lynn Reynolds. The film stars George Hernandez, Myrtle Gonzalez, Fred Church, Frank MacQuarrie, Val Paul and Countess Du Cello. The film was released on July 31, 1916, by Bluebird Photoplays, Inc..
  • Wikipedia
It Happened in Honolulu
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MovieJun 26, 1916

It Happened in Honolulu

It Happened in Honolulu released.
1915
The Missing Man
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MovieJun 21, 1915

The Missing Man

The Missing Man released.
1914
Her Higher Ambition
MovieDec 12, 1914

Her Higher Ambition

Fred, an actor, broken down in health, has come to the west, …
Fred, an actor, broken down in health, has come to the west, where he has fallen in love with Edythe. a simple country girl, the daughter of the sheriff. She tells Fred his suit is hopeless, and that she feels she has been ordained for a great stage career. Fred knows that her singing ambition can never be realized, and furthermore she never will be contented until she has had her fling at the stage. Her father, the sheriff, is trusted with a considerable sum of money for safekeeping by his friend, the ranchman. Edythe pleads to be sent to New York to begin her career, but her father tells her that finances can not permit of it. Edythe's birthday comes, and in her diary her father reads she is expecting that, for her birthday present, he will send her east. He recalls the money entrusted with him, and finally gives it to Edythe, telling her she can go. But Fred, disguised as a theatrical manager, has formed a little scheme of his own. He gives Edythe a hearing, and then informs her he is willing to risk sending her to New York and supplies her with the necessary money. Edyth returns the ranchman's money to her father, and soon leaves. A month goes by, and Edythe returns. Her father informs her of Fred's great sacrifice, and she hurries to offer belated thanks, but she arrives too late, and Edythe bitterly realizes at what cost has been "Her Higher Ambition."
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The Man in the Attic
MovieSep 27, 1914

The Man in the Attic

The ranchman sells his horse to Joe, supposedly a rancher, …
The ranchman sells his horse to Joe, supposedly a rancher, but in reality a counterfeiter. Joe rides into town and passes off a considerable amount of bad money. One of his victims is Fred. Another victim later meets Joe and knocks him from his horse. Joe fires after the man, and the bullet strikes Fred in the hand. Seeing a riderless horse, Fred follows it, as he knows it is the counterfeiter's horse. It brings him to the cabin where Dolly and her father live. Fred has previously met Dolly, and the two love each other. They hear the father coming and Fred goes up into the attic to hide. The sheriff and his men have decided to search all suspicious cabins for the counterfeiters. They arrive at the ranchman's cabin, just as the father is examining a counterfeit bill that Fred has been showing to Dolly. Things look bad for the ranchman, particularly when a deputy finds another roll of money, also counterfeit, which Joe had given him for the horse. A drop of blood falls on the sheriff's arm. He orders his men to search the attic above, and Fred is brought down. Fred tells what he knows, and the sheriff sends some of his men to search Joe's cabin. Counterfeiting apparatus is found and confiscated, Joe is taken a prisoner, and Dolly falls a prisoner to Fred.
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A Rose of Yesterday
MovieSep 20, 1914

A Rose of Yesterday

It was an accidental shot from his rifle that brought the …
It was an accidental shot from his rifle that brought the easterner and Dolly together. The stray bullet cut a rose from the bush that the little girl was caring for. Soon there was another rose in bloom to take its place, and by that time Dolly and Fred were more than friends. Joe, a rejected suitor, attempts to force his attentions on Dolly. She succeeds in getting his gun and orders him from the cabin. Fred hears her screams and hastens back. Outside the cabin he meets Joe, knocking him down, then dashes in. Dolly, thinking the intruder is Joe, fires. Later, after the doctor has arrived and pronounced Fred dead. Dolly, heartbroken with grief, goes to the rose bush, where she recalls the happy moments spent with Fred. Then, seeing the revolver still in her hand, allows it to raise slowly to her temple, but a vision of her aged and lonely father stays her hand, and for his sake she decides to live, though she may never forget her "Rose of Yesterday."
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The Story of the Old Gun
MovieJan 15, 1914

The Story of the Old Gun

Raymond Beahan, a young …
Raymond Beahan, a young chap from the city, pays a visit to his uncle, John Purcell, the sheriff. The day after he arrives, he dresses up in his uncle's hat, cartridge belt, chaps, etc., and is about to take an old gun from the wall to put in his belt when his uncle asks him not to take the gun, as he prizes it very highly. He then tells the boy the story of how the gun came into his possession. The story is so vivid to the boy, that when his uncle leaves him to round up some bandits, and he is left alone in the cabin, he falls asleep and dreams the same story his uncle has just related to him, only HE is the hero. In the dream, in the act of backing out of the bandit's way, he falls over a high cliff, and suddenly awakens to find himself precipitated upon the floor.
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1913
A Snakeville Courtship
MovieDec 27, 1913

A Snakeville Courtship

Jeremiah Green receives a …
Jeremiah Green receives a letter from his niece, stating that she is coming west, and is in the market for a husband. The news scatters fast throughout the western town, and when the fair Sophie arrives, her callers are numerous. One look at the three-hundred-pound debutante is enough to convince the men that they are not eligible for the marriage certificate, especially if Sophie is to be the bride. Many are the humorous incidents brought about by Sophie trying to capture one of the men for a husband, and the way they elude her affords great amusement for the onlooker.
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Lillian Christy
MarriageDecember 1913

Lillian Christy

Lillian Christy is an actress, known for Suspended Sentence …
Lillian Christy is an actress, known for Suspended Sentence (1913), The Mute Witness (1913) and When Youth Meets Youth (1912).
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The End of the Circle
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MovieNov 21, 1913

The End of the Circle

During the early days of the …
During the early days of the west, when those parts were poorly settled. Will Davis, a prospector, landed in a small town, A Mexican girl, Juanita by name, becomes much interested in Davis, and determines that he be hers and hers only. Dom Wilson, a ranchman, plays his cards two ways, first by making love to Juanita, and second by bestowing his attentions on a beautiful young Miss of the village, Eileen Sheridan. Davis meets Miss Sheridan and the two become infatuated with each other. The young prospector proposes to her and she accepts him. The news of the engagement spreads about the town and Will is congratulated heartily by all but Wilson and Juanita, who swear revenge. Juanita's love turns to hate, which makes her as bitter towards Davis as Wilson, and when a woman hates, the flames of hell are as heaven in comparison. Wilson calls on Eileen and tells her that Davis is leading a double life, that he is not true to her. Eileen refuses to believe the ranchman, but when he promises that she can see for herself, she realizes that the terrible statement may be true. Juanita "accidentally" calls on Davis at his cabin, where she tries to embrace him. Making sure that Wilson has led the unsuspecting Eileen within sight of the cabin door, she continues to force her attentions on Davis. The climax comes when Eileen sees the Mexican girl leave the cabin of her sweetheart. Disgusted with the one man she thought the world of, and not taking time to think of the future, Eileen, for spite, marries Don Wilson. Davis sees the two as they leave on a prairie schooner for other parts, and his heart throbs within his breast as though it would break. A few years elapse and we see Wilson, a drunkard of the lowest degree. He has forgotten that he ever loved Eileen and his only thought is of "more whiskey." Eileen's mental strain takes away her physical strength, and she becomes a victim of the white plague. A daughter is brought into the world to curse the unhappy marriage. The family pitch camp by the roadside and Dom becomes very abusive to his wife, when he discovers that they are almost out of provisions. He unhitches one of the horses and rides to the nearest town some miles away, there to sell his horse, the proceeds of which are spent for whiskey and to be gambled away. Eileen becomes worse, and fearing she will die, sends her young daughter in search of her father. Dom, in a drunken stupor, falls over a cliff, which brings about his untimely end. Davis, camping nearby, rushes to the scene to discover that it is his old rival. Davis climbs to the top of the cliff in time to save the life of Wilson's child from a bear. Will Davis carries the child to the prairie schooner, where he recognizes Eileen, Eileen clasps Davis and kisses him fondly, and passes off into another world, leaving the child to be taken care of by her former sweetheart, and he only too willingly promises to take care of her as he would his own.
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The Struggle
MovieOct 4, 1913

The Struggle

Dr. Sharp and his wife, Gretchen, live happily together in a little …
Dr. Sharp and his wife, Gretchen, live happily together in a little western town until the advent of the doctor's brother, Fred, who comes from the east to spend his vacation near his brother. He meets the doctor's wife and immediately falls in love, but visits her only when he knows his brother is away. The doctor learning of Fred's visits, shoots him. He repents, however, when he sees his brother's serious condition and does all he can to restore him. Affairs are happily adjusted when Fred on regaining consciousness begs forgiveness of his brother, and Gretchen assures her husband that she loves him only.
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The Belle of Siskiyou
MovieOct 2, 1913

The Belle of Siskiyou

Unable to bear her father's …
Unable to bear her father's cruelty, May leaves home. Black Moody finds her crying, and wandering around aimlessly. Taking her away, he installs her as barmaid in his saloon. Moody before this has held up the stagecoach, and although the sheriff is rather suspicions of him, he has no positive evidence, until the bandit's wife, furious at his bringing the girl into their home, gives him away. The man is arrested and May is taken back to her home by the young sheriff, to whom the girl's beauty and sweetness has made a strong appeal. A pretty romance between May and the sheriff later develops.
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Why Broncho Billy Left Bear County
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MovieSep 27, 1913

Why Broncho Billy Left Bear County

Through a kindly act Broncho …
Through a kindly act Broncho Billy earns the deep gratitude of Marion Rivers, who presents him with a Bible. Not long afterwards, she comes upon him as he is about to hold up the stage, but at sight of the girl he is overwhelmed with shame and taking out the little Bible promises her that he will live honorably. In the meantime, Marion's father holds up the stage at another point, and one of the stagecoach drivers, mounting a bareback pony, rides off for the sheriff. Broncho Billy sees Rivers get away with the money, and when he hears the sheriff and his men coming, for Marion's sake he goes to warn her father. To shield him, he takes the bags of money and rides away with the men after him. He leaves the money at the mile post with a, note saying: "Sheriff: I'm through with Bear County, this stick-up was my last," and rides across the border.
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Bonnie of the Hills
MovieSep 11, 1913

Bonnie of the Hills

Bonnie, a wholesome girl of the western mountain country, …
Bonnie, a wholesome girl of the western mountain country, becomes engaged to Ralph Stuart, a cowboy, after he promises her that he will stop drinking. John Trent, an Easterner, spending his vacation in the little western town, falls over an embankment. Bonnie and Ralph see him fall and go to his assistance. Ralph notices that his sweetheart is very much concerned about the stranger's wounds, which infuriates him. With Bonnie's help, Trent manages to get back to the hotel. Jealousy drives Ralph to drink. He goes to Bonnie and upbraids her. She returns the ring and dismisses him. Almost insane from whiskey and jealousy, he attempts to kill Trent. Bonnie comes to Trent's assistance and he gets away on her horse. Ralph gives chase and brings Trent to earth in a very sensational manner. Bonnie, however, has followed the men and she pleads with Ralph to spare Trent, whom she has grown to love. Ralph, now sobered, grants her request, even though it is at the expense of his own happiness.
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The Edge of Things
MovieAug 12, 1913

The Edge of Things

Charles Rogers, a ranchman in the far west, received a letter …
Charles Rogers, a ranchman in the far west, received a letter from his eastern partner, George Clayton, saying that he was coming on a visit to the ranch and see how things were progressing. Roger's wife, Evelyn, falls an easy victim to the winning ways of the city man, and becomes madly infatuated with him. One day her husband finds her in his arms and then the heavens fall. In his thirst for revenge, he invites Clayton to go hunting and entices him to the top of a steep precipice, where he attempts to throw him over. The way things turn about, in which Clayton saves Rogers' life, is entertaining in the extreme. Just see it.
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Broncho Billy and the Sheriff's Kid
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MovieFeb 22, 1913

Broncho Billy and the Sheriff's Kid

Broncho Billy, haying …
Broncho Billy, haying disturbed the laws of the state, is thrown into jail. The warden hands the outlaw a cup of water and a piece of stale bread. The latter grabs the warden's hand, pulls it through the bars and threatens the former with a broken arm unless he unlocks the door. Broncho Billy, having gained his freedom, takes to the woods. The sheriff is notified of Broncho Billy's escape and goes after him with a deputy. In the woods, Broncho Billy is surprised at hearing the fall of a body. He rushes in the direction of the noise. He finds a child about five years old unconscious from a fall. He takes the little girl to her home and the mother thanks Broncho Billy. Broncho Billy returns to the woods. The sheriff discovers Broncho Billy in the underbrush, fires at him and shoots him in the wrist. Broncho then returns to the child's home where the mother bandages his wound and promises him protection. The sheriff returns to his home where he finds his child in bed suffering from the fall. Broncho Billy in the next room, trying to reach for a glass of water, accidentally knocks over the wash pan. This arouses the sheriff. He demands that his wife tell him who is in the room. She refuses. Broncho Billy, taking a shotgun and holding it up with one hand enters the room and covers the sheriff. The sheriff's wife explains to her husband how Broncho Billy had helped the injured child. Broncho Billy backs out of the room into freedom.
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Broncho Billy's Gun Play
MovieJan 25, 1913

Broncho Billy's Gun Play

The sheriff of Sioux County, …
The sheriff of Sioux County, Arizona, is notified to locate the bandits' rendezvous. Carl Waters, the sheriff, scouts the country and finally locates them. Returning to the town saloon and dance hall Waters, who is smitten with the fair Caroline Heston, proposes to her. She promises to give her answer the following day. The next morning the sheriff enters the camp of the bandits. Through fear he gives up his oath of office and joins their band. Returning to the dance hall his sweetheart Caroline promises to become his wife if he keeps his oath of office. He hesitates, undecided what to do or to say, and finally leaves the place. Later the bandits visit the saloon. Waters decides that the love of Caroline is worth more than anything else in the world, and telegraphs Broncho Billy, his assistant, to come at once. Broncho Billy arrives. He tells the chief of the bandits, a full blooded Indian, that he would like to join their band. The Indian takes Broncho Billy to a den. Here the Indian pulls a gun on Broncho. Broncho Billy, a cool headed individual, calmly rolls a cigarette and pretends not to notice the Indian. Finished rolling the cigarette, Broncho puts his hand into his inside vest pocket, presumably for a match, but pulls out a revolver and makes the Indian drop his. Broncho Billy then takes him prisoner to jail. The sheriff, Waters, returns to the dance hall, where he tells Miss Heston that he has decided to keep his oath of office. The young couple plan their future happiness.
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1912
The Prospector
MovieDec 12, 1912

The Prospector

A lone prospector comes to a cabin in the woods where he seeks …
A lone prospector comes to a cabin in the woods where he seeks food and lodging. There he meets a woman and her small daughter who put him up. Soon her father and brother, miners, arrive and are uneasy with the stranger. That night, they plan to rob him, but the woman alerts him and helps him fend off his attackers. This gesture moves the prospector to marry the woman.
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Broncho Billy's Heart
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MovieNov 23, 1912

Broncho Billy's Heart

Old Silas Jordan, a settler, …
Old Silas Jordan, a settler, finds that his horse is not able to pull the heavy load demanded, and discovers the well-fed broncho of Jim Davis, a ranchman, staked out near the trail. Jordan deliberately takes the broncho, hitches it to his wagon and drives on. A few hours later he stops to cook dinner, and meets Broncho Billy, who has a great romp with Jordan's children and eats with them. The meal finished, Broncho bids Jordan goodbye and rides on. Late in the afternoon Broncho meets Jim Davis and a bunch of his cowboys, who are on the trail of the missing horse. Davis tells Broncho of the matter, declares that they will string up the man who has stolen the horse, then gallop on. For a moment Broncho studies, then suddenly remembers that Jordan was driving a horse answering Davis' description, and leading another behind the wagon. Realizing the danger of the old settler if he is caught, Broncho rides desperately down the trail, overtakes Jordan and offers to trade horses with him. Jordan agrees, exchange is made, and Jordan goes on. Turning the white horse loose on the trail. Broncho finds a good place nearby to bunk for the night, and has just pillowed his head on his saddle when he sees Davis and the boys gallop up, identify the horse and, thinking it had merely strayed away, gallop back up the trail. With a deep sigh of satisfaction Broncho lights a cigarette and puffs away contentedly, with a grim smile playing over his brown face.
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The Dance at Silver Gulch
MovieNov 19, 1912

The Dance at Silver Gulch

A dance is held one night at …
A dance is held one night at Silver Gulch Hall, and Joe Barton attends, in company with Mildred, his sweetheart. One unwelcome guest is Jim Silver, a cowpuncher, who is an old sweetheart of Mildred's. Mildred's refusal to dance with Silver infuriates him, and he is attempting to embrace her when Joe enters the hall, knocks Silver to the floor, and the two are separated by friends and their guns wrested from them. Silver leaves, swearing vengeance, and a few moments later Joe gallops madly after him to force an apology. Far out on the trail Silver's revolver accidentally explodes in the holster, wounding him severely. A moment later Joe finds him stretched out in the trail with his horse grazing nearby. In a terror of fear Joe gallops away, frightened at the thought that he may be accused of the shooting. Silver is found by Graham, a ranchman, who carries him into the house and summons the doctor. Graham's daughter, Rose, informs the sheriff, who immediately suspects Joe and sets out to find him. Joe is taken as he comes from the town saloon, and the next day is brought to trial. A friend, feeling the evidence is all against Joe, fires a shot through the courthouse window, that enables Joe to escape during the excitement. Reaching his sweetheart's ranch, he is concealed in the loft of the barn. Meanwhile Silver regains consciousness and signs a statement of Joe's innocence in the shooting. This is carried to Mildred by Rose. Joe is called from the barn and immediately starts on a run to town to inform the sheriff. He reaches the office just as the posse is returning from the search, is congratulated by the boys and starts back with the girls as the punchers give them a rousing cheer.
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An Indian's Friendship
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MovieNov 9, 1912

An Indian's Friendship

Broncho is instrumental in …
Broncho is instrumental in saving Yellow Wolf, an Indian, from the wrath of Dan Runnion, a surly cowpuncher, and Runnion swears revenge. His chance comes when he sees a notice from the county sheriff advising that cattle rustlers are at work and for ranchmen to watch their stock. Finding one of Broncho's shirts out on the clothesline, Runnion places an incriminating note in the pocket and steals away. Getting the ranchman, he returns to Broncho's snack and accuses him of being one of the rustlers. The ranchman finds the note in the pocket of Broncho's shirt advising Broncho to come and get his share at the proceeds from the stolen cattle, In a rage he summons his cowboys and Broncho is led away to be hanged. Meanwhile, Yellow Wolf, who has witnessed Runnion writing the incriminating note and heard his threat to get even with Broncho, rides madly to town, summons the sheriff, and they arrive in time to prevent the hanging of Broncho. Yellow Wolf tells the story and the guilty Runnion tries to escape, but is captured and meets his just deserts, while the boys gladly congratulate Broncho on his narrow escape.
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The Tomboy on Bar Z
MovieOct 22, 1912

The Tomboy on Bar Z

Pretty Letty King is the tomboy on Bar Z ranch. She fills the …
Pretty Letty King is the tomboy on Bar Z ranch. She fills the washing pans full of salt and when the boys come in from the corral at noon to wash, an awful time follows when they get their eyes and noses full of the smarting substance. Then Letty ties a lariat to the tablecloth, attaches the other end to a moving buggy and the boys' dinner is deposited on the floor. One morning, in the town store Letty meets Arthur Springer, an easterner, and the bond of affection springs up between them. Letty is also loved by Jim Dunn, a cowboy, and it goes hard with him when Letty returns his ring and announces her engagement to Springer. Two months later the stage drives up and Springer prepares to depart to the city with Letty to be married. The assembled cowboys give them a cheery departure, and Dunn watches the stage disappear down the long trail with dull agony written on his brown face. About this time Bob Blake, county sheriff, receives a notice from the Chief of Police of Cheyenne advising him to arrest Arthur Springer, wanted for wife abandonment. Meeting Dunn and the boys on the trail Blake informs them and a wild ride begins after the stage. Overtaking it the boys force Springer to clamber out and confess his guilt while Letty looks on in horror. Springer is led off under arrest and the boys conduct Letty back to the ranch house where she sobs out her misery until a touch on her shoulder causes her to look up into the kindly face of Dunn. Mutely he holds out the old engagement ring and a moment later the repentant tomboy is clasped in his arms.
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An Indian Sunbeam
MovieSep 28, 1912

An Indian Sunbeam

The accidental overturning of their "prairie schooner" kills a …
The accidental overturning of their "prairie schooner" kills a settler and his wife and leaves their little baby girl, Sunbeam, alone in the world. Discovered by Big Wolf, an Indian brave from a nearby tribe, Sunbeam is adopted and brought up as one of their number. Twelve years later Sunbeam is a beautiful girl and has been told of her parentage by Big Wolf who now loves her. One morning Bob Harris, a cowboy, and his pal are given a drink of water by Sunbeam. Mutual love springs up between she and Harris and she tells him she is not an Indian, but loves them for their goodness. Hiding in the rocks Big Wolf tries to kill the cowboy, but the bullet passes through his hat and he rides on unharmed. Filled with hatred and jealousy Big Wolf resolves that if he cannot have Sunbeam no one else shall win her. Making her a captive in her wigwam that night he ties her to the back of a wild bronco and drives it out upon the plains. In the early gray of morning Bob and his pal are herding the cattle when Bob catches sight of the girl on the bronco's back. Hastening to the corral he secures his lariat and informs the boys who dash out to the rescue. Realizing his plan has failed Big Wolf, who has been hiding nearby, attempts to stab Bob in the back, but is shot dead by one of the cowboys who catches sight of him in time. The bronco is captured and Sunbeam is carried back to the ranch unconscious by Bob. A few weeks later the assembled cowboys give Sunbeam and Harris a rousing send-off as they ride away to be married across the rolling hills.
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The Ranchman's Trust
MovieSep 7, 1912

The Ranchman's Trust

Jim Boulder, a ranchman, receives a letter one morning, from his …
Jim Boulder, a ranchman, receives a letter one morning, from his old friend and chum, George Stapleton, a New Yorker, saying his son Elliott, is coming out to the ranch to pull himself together and to take good care of the boy, above all to keep liquor from him. Next day Elliott arrives and immediately falls in love with Boulder's pretty daughter, Sue. She returns his love and thus arouses the insane jealousy of Bill Dunham, the ranch foreman. A month passes and Bill, discovering that Elliott's weakness is drink, manages to smuggle a bottle of liquor into his room, thinking the young fellow will disgrace himself. Elliott finds the bottle, but resists the temptation and demands to know of Boulder who put it into the room. Boulder confronts Dunham, accuses him, and the foreman confesses. Boulder discharges him. Next afternoon Dunham finds Elliott and Sue together and attempts to kill the young easterner. However, the bullet lodges in the boy's shoulder, creating a painful but not dangerous wound. Sue has him carried into the house by the boys, then Dunham's gun is found on the spot and the boys start in pursuit of the cowardly ruffian. An hour later Durham is brought back at a lariat's end and Boulder is about to have him hanged when Elliott spares his life by declaring him too big a coward to die. Riding Dunham to the creek that marks the state line, the boys drive him across it at gun's point. Some weeks later Elliott and Sue are married in the little town church, and ride off down the trail amidst a shower of rice and old shoes thrown by the gay cowboys, while the hills re-echo the sound of their six-shooters popping in honor of the event.
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A Moonshiner's Heart
MovieJul 27, 1912

A Moonshiner's Heart

Old Seth Stevens and his pretty daughter Vedah, live in their …
Old Seth Stevens and his pretty daughter Vedah, live in their rough hill-shack. Stevens conducts an illicit "still" in an abandoned shanty, and the "moonshine" whiskey is concealed in loads of hay and sold in the nearby town. One of the moonshiners is Tom Jackson, who loves Vedah. Stevens encourages Tom's attentions, but Vedah declares that she does not love the young moonshiner and his heart is broken in consequence. Meanwhile, word of the "still" trickles out to civilization and the county sheriff dispatches Ross Chalmers, a young deputy, into the hills in the guise of a wandering artist, to run down the moonshiners and destroy the "still." One morning as Chalmers is tramping the hills he meets Vedah and speaks with her. The girl is attracted by his culture and good looks, and, in succeeding meetings their friendship ripens into love. Driving to town one morning with a load of whiskey, Tom discovers Chalmers and Vedah in each others' arms. Later word is brought to the moonshiners that Chalmers is a revenue officer, and Tom instantly takes to the hills with his rifle, locates Chalmers and Vedah and is about to savagely shoot the deputy down when Vedah desperately promises to marry him if he will conduct Chalmers to safety. For a moment Tom hesitates, then lowers his rifle and leads them off down the trail. Coming to the parson's cottage, Tom surprises them all by calling him out and ordering him to marry Vedah and Chalmers. Realizing what the young moonshiner is sacrificing, Vedah thanks him with tears of gratitude In her brown eyes and Chalmers wrings his hand warmly. Then while Tom strides away to the hills, stifling the love that cries out within him, Vedah and Chalmers are united in marriage.
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The Sheriff and His Man
MovieMay 18, 1912

The Sheriff and His Man

The Arizona Kid, a notorious …
The Arizona Kid, a notorious outlaw, makes his escape from jail by sawing the bars from the cell window. Next morning this is discovered and reward notices are scattered broadcast offering $1,000 reward for his apprehension and giving his picture for identification. Todd, sheriff of Coyote County, reads one of the notices and locates Arizona in the town saloon. He captures him, then notifies Matthews, sheriff of Gulch County, to come and get his man. Matthews rides across the desert, takes the outlaw, handcuffs him, puts him on a horse and starts back with him to jail. Out in the desert two villainous Mexicans see the sheriff and the prisoner and decide to secure the horses. Stopping Matthews they beg for a drink of water. Matthews hands over his canteen and is murderously struck down with a knife in the hand of one of the rascals Arizona pleads with the men to leave him some water, but they mount their horses and leave him stranded and afoot with the wounded sheriff on his hands. Securing the key from the sheriff's pocket Arizona unlocks the handcuffs, gets Matthews on his back and staggers toward town. After a terrible day's travel he arrives at a prospector's shanty, leaves Matthews, takes his star, borrows a gun and sets out after the Mexicans. He runs them down manacles them and rides back. A week has elapsed and Matthews is on the road to recovery from his wound when Arizona enters with his prisoners. He is about to surrender the star and submit to arrest, when Matthews tells him he is going to make him a deputy, wrings his hand, and hustles the Mexicans out, leaving Arizona to proudly polish the star.
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Broncho Billy and the Bandits
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MovieMay 4, 1912

Broncho Billy and the Bandits

Jim Matthews, express agent …
Jim Matthews, express agent in Red Rock, Arizona, and his daughter Alice, are watching anxiously over the bedside of Mrs. Matthews, who is very ill. An express box of money is now left by the stage and Matthews is ordered to guard it overnight. The "Arizona Kid," a notorious bandit, who has followed the stage and watched while they left the box, now gallops back to the rendezvous of his pals, tells them of the easy chance to rob the office and they start at once. Meanwhile Alice has sent her father for a doctor and is all alone with her sick mother. Suddenly a knock is heard, Alice looks out, sees a shadowy figure, thinks it is the "Arizona Kid," a notice and picture of whom is tacked upon the wall, gets her father's revolver, opens the door and admits Broncho Billy, who has stopped for a night's lodging. Alice relieves him of his guns and, in spite of his protests, backs him into a storeroom and locks the door. A few moments later the bandits gallop up and Alice, realizing her mistake, liberates Broncho, who gets his guns, tells Alice to hint that the money is in the storeroom and that he will do the rest. A moment later the bandits, led by the "Kid," burst in the door and cover Alice. Weakly she nods toward the storeroom and, laughing exultantly, the gang rush in, only to be confronted by Broncho with leveled guns. Quickly disarming them, Broncho backs them out the door at gun's point, while Alice gazes after him with the love light shining in her eyes.
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1911
Broncho Billy's Adventure
MovieDec 30, 1911

Broncho Billy's Adventure

Broncho Billy, on a …
Broncho Billy, on a pilgrimage, pulls up at a small tavern and takes a room there for the night. The pretty daughter of the tavern-keeper has many sweethearts, but the father, fearing he will lose his daughter, starts a row with them, wounding one seriously. Broncho Billy takes the wounded man's part and makes the tavern-keeper provide a bed for him, while the doctor is sent for. The others are determined to lynch the tavern-keeper, but are prevented from doing so by Broncho Billy, who, however, declares that if the girl's sweetheart dies, he will turn her father over to the wounded man's pals. Luckily, the young man recovers and the old tavern-keeper is persuaded to give the young couple his blessing.
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The Lucky Card
MovieMay 27, 1911

The Lucky Card

George Maxwell, a young cowboy, rescues a fever-stricken …
George Maxwell, a young cowboy, rescues a fever-stricken Mexican prospector and carrying him to an inn in the vicinity like a good Samaritan, pays the innkeeper a sum of money to care for the stricken man until he recovers. A few weeks later, when the Mexican recovers and starts to go on his journey again the landlord gives him a card left by Maxwell, giving the name of the rescuer. A few months later Maxwell finds himself in another small western town, awaiting a stagecoach to take him on to his ranch. He seeks to pass away the time in Red "Ike's" dance hall, a typical western amusement place, thronged day and night with Mexican women, cowboys and miners. Innocently he proposes a dance with a young Mexican girl and is about to place his arm around her when a burly Mexican steps between him and the girl and an engagement takes place in which Maxwell comes out the winner. Vowing revenge, the Mexican enlists two or three of his pals in a scheme to get even with the American. The kidnapping is carefully planned and Maxwell falls an easy victim. He is taken to the Mexican's rendezvous and Senorita, his sweetheart, is dragged before him. Death is imminent when the American recognizes one of the men as the man he had rescued a year before. It is then that the Mexican shows his gratitude in quickly cutting Maxwell's bonds and taking out a revolver, prevents the assassination.
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Alkali Ike's Auto
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MovieMay 20, 1911

Alkali Ike's Auto

Both "Alkali" and "Mustang" Pete loved Betty Brown, and the …
Both "Alkali" and "Mustang" Pete loved Betty Brown, and the lady had her hands full in keeping the lovers from shooting each other. One day "Alkali" called on Betty with a pair of handsome saddle horses and asked her to go riding with him. She agreed, but the resourceful "Mustang," driving up with a handsome horse and carriage, carried off the lady. "Alkali" goes to the village inn, inclined to drink himself to death, but finally trades for an old junk automobile his two horses, and clambering in the seat, starts in pursuit of his rival and the lady. Overtaking them, he has no difficulty in persuading Betty to ride with him. But the auto breaks down and "Alkali," endeavoring to fix it, turns on the juice and the rattle-trap car starts down the trail at lightning speed, leaving "Alkali" behind. After a thrilling and exciting ride the car is ditched and poor Betty is thrown headlong into the road.
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The Sheriff's Chum
MovieApr 8, 1911

The Sheriff's Chum

Two young men of a western town, Will Phelps and George …
Two young men of a western town, Will Phelps and George Arden, are in love with the same girl, the belle of the village. Having been pals from boyhood they decide to let the girl choose between them and to abide by her decision without argument or malice. Jessie chooses Phelps, and Arden, although deeply hurt by her decision, presses the hands of both and wishes them happiness. Several years elapse during which time Jessie and Will are married and the latter has become sheriff of the county. It is then that Arden returns and the two men are apparently happy in being together again. Will invites George to luncheon with him and Jessie and George accept. During the meal a deputy rushes in and informs the young sheriff that a prisoner has escaped. Will, before leaving, tells Arden to make himself at home, which Arden proceeds to do but in a manner of which Jessie does not approve. Finding himself alone with his former sweetheart, he endeavors to persuade her to leave her husband and when she refuses seizes her in his arms and kisses her. She runs out into her husband's office, but it is deserted. Will enters as Arden again seizes the frightened wife and springing upon his former pal beats him in fury until the whipped man dashes for the door and safety. It is then that Jessie knows that she has chosen wisely and going to her husband's arms lifts her eyes in thanks to God.
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Across the Plains
MovieApr 1, 1911

Across the Plains

Jennie Lee and her father are on their way to Golden …
Jennie Lee and her father are on their way to Golden California, from a little Kansas farm, traveling in a prairie schooner. At the last settlement visited by the two, the old man, who has a weakness for drink, purchases several bottles of whiskey, which he begins drinking when they have made camp for the night. A lone cowboy calls upon them and finds the old man in a jovial mood and cautions him to beware of the hostile tribe of Indians, through whose country they are now traveling. Unmindful of the warning, Lee continues to drink until thoroughly intoxicated, despite the pleadings of his daughter. Suddenly over the brow of a hill a scouting Indian is seen to appear, sees the wagon and the drunken white, and slipping cautiously away, goes to his Indian village, where he informs the other braves of the trespassing settlers. The Indians leap astride their shaggy pones and with was whoops ride off to make short work of the whites. The girl sees them coming and implores her father to get into the wagon, but he refuses and the girl, knowing that she must act quickly if she would save her own life, springs into the wagon, seizes the reins and urges the horses to their utmost speed. After a long and thrilling ride in which the Indians gradually gain on her, she is joined by the friendly cowboy, who sends a crony who was with him, to a neighboring ranch for help. The girl and cowboy race the Indians and pull up at a deserted shack in which they protect themselves against the Indians until the arrival of the ranchmen, who disperse the Indians. The girl expresses her great joy at being rescued and upon proposal of her cowboy protector that she marry him, she readily agrees.
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1910
Under Western Skies
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MovieAug 6, 1910

Under Western Skies

Kate Allison, an exceptionally beautiful western girl, is …
Kate Allison, an exceptionally beautiful western girl, is engaged to marry a young easterner, a long-time family friend. In the first scene the fiancé is bidding his sweetheart good-bye and he is to be accompanied to the station by his prospective father-in-law. The girl is left alone with a warning that should she be molested by any of the crowd of drunken cowpunchers who would be returning from a dance at a neighboring ranch, not to hesitate to shoot. We arc next shown three young punchers, all intoxicated, riding up to the door of the cottage. All dismount, and one, peering into the window, sees the girl alone. Reelingly they enter to find the girl covering them with a Winchester, but the foremost of the gang strides forward and before she can pull the trigger jerks the gun from her hands. The punchers resolve to play a game of poker to see who will win the young lady. A greasy pack is brought forth and the game starts. The girl sees the desperateness of the situation and resolves to employ desperate means in protecting herself. A card falls on the floor from the hand of the puncher nearest her, and seizing it she scribbles a line across the face and slips it into the puncher's hands. It reads: "I will be yours in marriage if you will protect me from the others." The puncher reads the note, covertly watching the others, then as he looks at the girl a new sensation sweeps over his soul and he nods his head. He starts an altercation, accusing one of the others of cheating, which ends in all the punchers leaving the room to settle the dispute at twenty paces, in the old-fashioned and gentlemanly way. When the puncher returns to the girl he is alone. He tells her she must now make good her promise and swears faithfully to make himself worthy of her. She nods her head, but it is a look of hatred and scorn which she fastens on him as they leave. They are married and go to the cowpuncher's quarters. He apologizes for his poverty but repeats his promise to make her happy if she will give him a chance. Yet she steadfastly refuses to allow him to make love to her. A few months drag by and the former fiancé of the girl traces her to her new home. He demands an explanation and asks her if she loves her husband. She answers angrily that she does not and then eagerly accepts his invitation to return east with him. Without horses or other conveyances it is almost impossible for them to cross the strip of desert which separates them from her father's home, but they resolve to attempt the journey. On the way they become lost, and the last drop of the canteen, which her fiancé had selfishly drained himself, finds them in desperate straits and facing the most cruel of all deaths. The girl stumbles and begs for his assistance, but the panic-stricken young fellow refuses. They stumble upon the bones of a horse and the shock of this sight is the last straw on the camel's back and the girl totters to the ground in a faint. The young fellow offers no assistance, but staggers desperately on. An hour later, dazed and blindly tottering, he falls into the arms of a young prospector, who, after giving the young man restoratives, learns of the woman lost on the trail. The young prospector hurries back on the path indicated by the young fellow and an hour later staggers back into camp with the young girl in his arms. She has regained her senses and recognizes in the prospector her deserted husband. The cowardly young fiancé then asks the girl to go on with him, but she refuses and clings to her husband, whom she has vowed to love and obey forever after.
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The Unknown Claim
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MovieJul 9, 1910

The Unknown Claim

Reuben Ellis and his daughter, Belle, are in hard financial …
Reuben Ellis and his daughter, Belle, are in hard financial straits. Burdened with debts and pressed by persistent creditors, the old man finds but one way to meet his obligations, and that is mortgaging the ranch. Belle tries to console him, but agrees that they must borrow money. Ellis rides into town and applies to a money-lender for a sum sufficient to meet his debts. Walker, the loan agent, agrees to ride out to the ranch and look it over, but after he has viewed the ramshackle buildings and pitiful collection of household furniture he shakes his head and says the place is not worth a cent. Now it happens that one of Ellis' employees, who has been in love with Belle, in wandering over the ranch, discovers an unknown claim, which bears evidence of a good pay streak. He is excitedly making an inspection when he hears voices, and then hides behind a rock as Walker and Ellis come into view. Walker is giving his final verdict, offering a trivial sum for the property. The old man shakes his head and turns away. Walker is about to go, when the ranch-hand stops him and shows him the rich ore deposits of the unknown claim. Walker appreciates the value of the mine and resolves to accept the mortgage from Ellis and, if possible, to secure the ranch property. Cautioning the ranch-hand to be silent, he again interviews Ellis and offers him money on the ranch property. The next day an assayer, accompanying Walker and the ranch-hand, make investigations at the mine. After this the assayer leaves them and, in passing Ellis' ranch house, stops to get a drink. Belle brings him the drink and lingers near him shyly as he questions her. It is a case of mutual infatuation, but young Bartwell, the assayer, makes his departure without making further advances. A year goes by and Ellis, who is still deeply in debt, receives a letter from Walker advising him that the mortgage will fall due that day and unless it is paid he will immediately foreclose. Ellis is in despair, when Belle resolves to go to the money-lender and intercede with him. As she leaves the house she is confronted by young Bartwell, smiling pleasantly at her. He has something important to tell her, he says, and asks her to go for a walk with him. By a lucky accident they pass the mine which Bartwell has assayed the year before and he makes mention of the fact, wondering that it has not been developed. The girl looks surprised and tells him that the property belongs to her father. Then she goes on to explain about the mortgage and how it is likely to be foreclosed at noon that day. Bartwell sees through the whole wicked scheme. He looks at his watch and finds it is after 10. Two hours to make a twelve-mile ride! Bartwell presses a roll of bills into her hand and, helping her into his saddle, tells her to ride like the wind. The ride which follows is thrilling and shows most remarkable horsemanship. At ten minutes to 12 she springs from the saddle in front of Walker's office and enters. One of the rogues, hearing her coming, has attempted to set the clock up ten minutes, but she sees the trick and makes him turn the hand back. Then she offers the money and demands the mortgage. It is turned over to her and she goes out. At the ranch house a few hours later the girl enters breathlessly after her long ride and flourishes the mortgage. The old man tears it up, and Bartwell, who has waited for this opportunity, confesses his love to the girl and is accepted.
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The Bad Man's Last Deed
MovieJul 2, 1910

The Bad Man's Last Deed

Arizona Pete, typical bad …
Arizona Pete, typical bad man, is the hero of the story. The first scene shows him leaving his shack, after adjusting his pistol. He rides into town, enters a saloon and orders drinks for the crowd. A young chap, just out from the east, refuses to drink with him, but is finally persuaded by the cracking of Arizona's pistol aimed at his heels. Pete, now happily inspired by a liberal quantity of "Old Henry," hearing that there is a dance in town, mounts and rides around to the dance hall, Here are gathered the young men and women of the town, dancing merrily in the tune of old Uncle Eb's squeaky violin. Pete enters and breaks up the dance, but during the melee that follows, Pete is shot in the pistol hand and deprived of his weapon. A young girl, feeling sorry for the misguided fellow, offers to bind his wound and he consents. She is the sister of the young easterner of a few scenes before. The sheriff, who has been apprised of Arizona's latest misconduct, resolves that the bad man has held sway long enough in his county, so, organizing a posse of citizens and armed with a petition and plenty of horse-pistols, he rides off to Arizona's shack to inform the latter that there is one too many bad men in Mariposa County, and that he will find it healthier on the other side of the county line, in short, Arizona is threatened with instant death if he dares get in range of the gun of any citizen residing in the county. Arizona sees he is beaten and consents to leave the country. Accompanied by the sheriff and posse he rides to the boundary line, waves his hand and rides out of view. The boys congratulate themselves on having rid themselves sf each a miscreant and turn to ride back to town. A few days later old Jim Wayman, the uncle of the two young eastern people, asks Bob, the boy, to drive a herd of cattle across the county to the nearest market. Bob disposes of the cattle and is persuaded by a pal, accompanying him, to enter a gambling dive and take a hand at poker. Of course he is fleeced out of the entire roll which he obtained from the sale of the cattle and is about to leave despairingly when Arizona Pete enters. The bad man recognizes the boy and understands the situation, then forces the gambler who had fleeced the hoy to return the money. In the exchange of the money, a locket which the boy had is turned over and Arizona recognizes in the face of the ornament the picture of the girl who had bound his hand when he had been shot at the dance hall. The boy explains that this is his sister. Bob is thoroughly intoxicated and Arizona resolves to take him home. An hour or two later they cross the boundary line, and the bad man, aware that he is on deadly ground, trusts to luck to take him through without being seen. They arrive at the ranch house and Bob is taken into the tender hands of his sister, who comes out later, followed by her uncle, to thank him for rescuing the boy. The girl and her uncle, after shaking hands with the bad man, enter the house, and Arizona turns to leave. Just then the sheriff, stopping in the road outside the yard, sees the trespasser and, raising his revolver, fires. Arizona whirls on his heel and falls in the dust. A moment later the girl runs out and is joined by the sheriff. She explains why the bad man broke his promise. "I'm sorry, Pete, I didn't know," he says, taking the dying man by the hand. "That's all right, sheriff," he answers, "it was comin' to me an' I got it. I was a bad man and you were a better shot." Then he turns to the girl and says he will be happy if he can take just one good thing with him. She bends over and kisses him and he dies with a smile on his lips.
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The Girl and the Fugitive
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MovieMar 19, 1910

The Girl and the Fugitive

Minnie Harding, a Western …
Minnie Harding, a Western maiden, is preparing for a hard washing day. Sam, the negro helper, is assisting her with the wash, carrying water and filling the tub. While he is making his third trip to the well, a cowboy rides up to the cottage and asks Minnie for a drink. She goes to get it and the cowboy, taking advantage of her hospitality, makes love to her. Minnie repulses him and the cowboy becomes insulting. When Sam returns he finds Minnie struggling in the arms of the cowboy, but being a coward himself, he runs out to the road to see if other help cannot be secured. Ross White, another cowboy, is cantering by when Sam sees him and tells him that Minnie has been insulted by a strange cowboy. White is a good friend of Minnie's and, hurriedly dismounting, runs to the house. White orders the cowboy away and the latter, menacing White with future revenge, sneaks away. The scene changes to the front of a little Western saloon and gambling house. White rides up, dismounts and enters. Seating himself at a table, he takes a hand in a game of poker, but soon detects that the other cowboys are cheating. White accuses one of the fellows, a quarrel is started, there is a flash of revolvers, a shot is fired, and White breaks through the crowd and runs outside. White hurries to Minnie Harding's cottage and begs that she conceal him from his pursuers. The girl, thankful to White for his defending her earlier in the day, hides him in a closet just as the leader of the cowboys raps at the door. She admits him. The cowboy inquires if White has been near, informing her that they had seen him near the cottage. She shakes her head. The cowboy, finding the girl alone, makes love to her and White is again forced to defend her. But the cowboy is too quick for White this time, and with his gun leveled against White's breast he disarms the latter and ties his hands securely behind him. Then he turns to the door, goes out and fires his revolver twice, the signal to the rest of the men that the fugitive has been caught. But in the meantime Minnie has cut White's bonds and when the cowboy re-enters White lunges at him and disarms him. When the cowboys dash up to the cottage the leader is permitted to step out and state that White has made his getaway again. To make sure that the cowboys will not misconstrue their leader's words. White has pressed the end of the cowboy's revolver against its owner's ribs and threatened to shoot him if the scheme does not work. The scheme does work, as the leader clearly indicates that White has gone off through the woods and that they had better hurry right after him. The cowboys ride away and White drags his captive into the cottage again. After he has made sure that the other cowboys are well out of the way White liberates the leader. Then he turns to Minnie and stretches out his hand. She hesitates and he opens his arms to her. She runs to him and gathering her in his arms he kisses her tenderly. The leader makes a feeble excuse and hurries out of the room.
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The Mexican's Faith
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MovieFeb 26, 1910

The Mexican's Faith

Tony Perez, a Mexican cowpuncher, is driven from …
Tony Perez, a Mexican cowpuncher, is driven from the ranch where he is employed for some misdemeanor or other, and after vainly endeavoring to find work, tries the gate of Dan Farman's ranch, "The Mosquito," and applies for a job. His hard luck story rings true and old Dan, who is of a charitable turn, puts the Mexican to work. Alice Farman, the daughter and "flower of the ranch," is in love with Nat Michaels, the ranch foreman. Perez, who has seen Alice from time to time, becomes deeply infatuated with the girl, and one day when he encounters her alone, he voices his passionate love. The girl shakes her head and scorns him. Perez then insults the girl and attempts to kiss her. A darkey servant, who has been near, sees this, and running to the bunkhouse, summons a number of cowboys. Alice, raging with indignation, tells them that the Mexican had insulted her. The mounted cowboys ask where Perez has gone and when she indicates that he has run to his cabin, they ride off in that direction, telling her they will attend to the "dirty greaser." An hour later they return, with the despairing Mexican their prisoner. He is lashed to hitching post, while one of the cowboys summons Alice. The Mexican is sentenced to a fearful horse-whipping and Alice is invited to administer the lashes, but she revolts against this brutal treatment. The Mexican begs for mercy and finally she forces the cowboys to release him. Perez is immediately reformed and becomes a most faithful and valuable servant. Several weeks elapse and Dick Chalmers, an easterner, arrives at the ranch. He falls in love with Alice, but each proposal he makes is refused by her. The girl at last is forced to confess to her fiancé the annoying attentions paid her by Chalmers, and Michaels, very indignant, tells her that he will make short work of the easterner if he persist in his insults toward her. Chalmers, who is "black" clean through, resolves to have Alice at any price. He engages a Mexican greaser to help him and together they kidnap the girl and carry her to a deserted cabin. Tony Perez, however, has followed them to the cabin and overpowering the Mexican, who is acting as sentinel at the door, rushes into the shack in time to spare Alice from any further indignities at the hands of Chalmers. Perez's knife flashes and would have made quick work of Chalmers had Alice not interfered. Tony understands and draws back, slipping the knife into its sheath. Then Chalmers, realizing his narrow escape, hastily rises and slinks out of the cabin. Tony sinks on his knee and kisses the girl's hand. He has kept the faith.
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The Cowboy and the Squaw
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MovieFeb 19, 1910

The Cowboy and the Squaw

Tom Ripley, a cowpuncher …
Tom Ripley, a cowpuncher from the Circle A ranch, wins the hatred of Jim Simpson, another cowpuncher, when he defends Lightfeather, a pretty squaw, from the insults of Simpson. The affair occurs in the Silver Dollar saloon in Bisbee. Some few days later Lightfeather goes to her protector's cabin and presents him with a pair of fine moccasins. Tom is duly grateful and advises the little Indian maiden that if she is ever annoyed again, not to hesitate to shoot the persecutor. Not long after this meeting Simpson encounters Ripley out on the range on the brink of a precipice. A fight ensues in which Ripley is thrown over the cliff and frightfully wounded on the rocks below. Ripley's riderless horse gallops away and is later seen and recognized by Lightfeather. The squaw mounts the horse and follows the tracks back to the top of the cliff where she finds her good white friend. After much difficulty she assists him back to the cabin and cares for him in his convalescence. Simpson, who has vowed to "get" Ripley at any cost, watches Tom's cabin day and night but the wary Lightfeather has seen him skulking about and keeps a sharp lookout after Tom. Later when she sees Simpson slipping threateningly on Ripley and about to fire at him, she draws her own weapon and a timely shot kills the would-be murderer. Ripley turns to find Simpson lying dead, just behind him, when the little squaw comes from behind her hiding place in the nearby bushes, confessing that she had killed Simpson to save him. Ripley brings up his horse and swinging into the saddle, pulls the squaw up behind him, just as a party of cowboys, who have heard the shot, run upon the scene. A lively chase follows. By numerous tricks Ripley throws his pursuers off the trail and after a long ride draws rein at a little creek, the boundary line of two counties. When he crosses this he knows he will be safe from the sheriff, at least. Pulling a notebook from his pocket Ripley scribbles a line to the sheriff, which be ties to a weed at the water's edge. Some time later the sheriff and his posse arrive at the crossing and find the note. It reads: "Buck Brady, Sheriff: We have crossed the boundary line forever. Good-bye. The squaw only killed a cur, and you know it. Tom Ripley." The sheriff reads the note aloud and turns to his men. "Tom's right," he says, "that Simpson was never no account, nohow." And the little party of cowboys swing leisurely into their saddles and turn their horses' heads toward home.
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1909
The Spanish Girl
MovieDec 18, 1909

The Spanish Girl

The story concerns Lola Gonzales, a Spanish dancing girl, who …
The story concerns Lola Gonzales, a Spanish dancing girl, who falls in love with Tom Wilson, better known by the sobriquet "Bud," foreman of the Circle "A" ranch, and opens with a scene near the ranch house with Lola dancing the old fandango to the entertainment of a half-dozen Mexican vaqueros. Wilson comes on the scene and sending the Mexicans off to work, goes on his way attending to his duties. Lola follows and endeavors to make love to him. Wilson shows that he is not at all affected and tells her that he is engaged to marry Martha Allison, the daughter of his employer. Lola turns away in a jealous rage and vows to break up the affair. A few days go by and Lola again encounters young Wilson. This time Martha is with him. Lola steals away, and is soon joined by Pedro Mayos, her Mexican admirer. Pedro hates the young foreman and they propose a scheme to put Wilson at outs with his sweetheart. Pedro contrives to meet Martha and induces her to go with him for a walk in the orchard. At the same time Lola hunts up Wilson and begs him to go with her for just a little walk. Wilson refuses at first, but hurries away with her when Lola offers to prove that Martha is untrue to him. Lola and he go into the orchard and find Pedro and Martha together. Wilson, fully convinced that Martha is untrue to him, cruelly denounces her and leaves. Martha turns on Pedro indignantly. Lola joins Wilson in another part of the orchard and makes love to him. He is about to take her in his arms when a rider comes upon them and delivers a message. The note informs Wilson that he has been appointed deputy sheriff in place of Hank Smith, lately deceased. Wilson hurries away and Lola is left alone. Pedro comes on the scene and demands recompense for the part he played in spoiling Wilson's love affair. The girl is convinced she has won the foreman and turns coldly away from her Mexican admirer. Pedro, in a rage, strikes her in the face and tells her to be off. Lola, stung by the insult, hurries away to tell her friends of Pedro's brutality. When her story is told to the Mexicans they resolve to lynch Pedro, and ride off to Pedro's shack. Pedro hears that the Mexicans are after him and endeavors to elude them. On the way he meets another Mexican, whom he begs to go in search of the sheriff, then continues his flight. The pursuers soon strike Pedro's trail and track him to a deserted cabin. A lively fight ensues between the Mexicans and Pedro, but the incensed Mexicans soon overpower him, and are about to lynch him when Deputy Wilson rides up. The new deputy's timely arrival saves Pedro's life, the Mexicans are disarmed and sent about their business, and Pedro is handcuffed and started to the jail. On the way Pedro confesses his part of the conspiracy with Lola and thus gains his freedom. Wilson makes all haste to return to Martha and to ask her forgiveness for having misjudged her. The scene ends with the two in each other's arms.
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The Ranchman's Rival
MovieDec 11, 1909

The Ranchman's Rival

Jim Watson, cow puncher, big, brusque man of the plains, …
Jim Watson, cow puncher, big, brusque man of the plains, falls in love with Annie Morgan, the daughter of a fairly prosperous Western ranchman. After a short courtship Annie is won and plans for the marriage are made. Annie and Jim quarrel and at this most opportune time, Walter Milton, a wealthy young Easterner, honks into town in his big four-cylinder touring car, becomes enamored of the pretty Annie and lays plans for the frustration of the happy romance. Milton contrives to obtain an introduction and invites Annie for an auto ride. He laughs at her efforts to resist the temptation and she finally yields. It is the old story of the lure of the gold that glitters. Annie is persuaded by Milton to return Jim's ring and to wed him. Jim is sent away broken-hearted, but resigned in the belief that Milton can make her happier. Milton's intentions are the lowest and most despicable. He arranges with a Mexican "greaser" to pose as a "preacher" and perform the fake ceremony. A clergyman's suit and hat is furnished the Mexican to lend dignity to his lank form, and Milton then drives back to fetch Annie. In the meantime Jim has decided to leave the ranch and, bidding good-bye to his old-time pals, bundles up his few belongings, throws his saddle over his shoulder and starts on the long hike to the railway station. A smartly dressed young woman, a rarity in Jonesville, is pacing up and down the railway station when Jim arrives. As he passes her she looks up and, a little embarrassed, questions him, "I beg pardon, sir, but do you know Walter Milton, my husband?" The big Westerner looks at her kindly, "Walter Milton," then as the truth dawns on him, "your husband!" Explanations follow. Milton left El Paso in the auto for an extensive tour and was to meet her at Jonesville two weeks later. She has arrived somewhat ahead of the time set. Jim tells her to wait, then borrowing a horse, rides at breakneck speed back to the ranch. He traces the auto to the Mexican's shanty, arriving just in time to prevent the wedding. Without any explanation Watson forces Milton and Annie into the auto and orders the chauffeur to drive back to Jonesville. When they arrive at the station Milton is forced to confess to Annie and the rightful Mrs. Milton his nefarious scheme. Jim leaves the trio and saunters over to the post office and general store. A short time later, repentant and ashamed, Annie comes to him and begs forgiveness. Jim's big heart melts and he takes her in his arms and restores the ring to her finger.
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1889
Fred Church
BirthOctober 1889

Fred Church

Fred Church was born.
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