American Actor

John B. O'Brien

  • Dec 13, 1884 - Aug 15, 1936 (age 51)
Search the latest about John B. O'Brien on Bing
1936
John B. O'Brien
PersonalAugust 1936

John B. O'Brien

John B. O'Brien passed away.
1929
Saturday's Lesson
www.imdb.com
MovieNov 9, 1929

Saturday's Lesson

A man dressed as the devil scares the gang into minding their …
A man dressed as the devil scares the gang into minding their mothers.
  • IMDb
Noisy Noises
www.imdb.com
MovieFeb 9, 1929

Noisy Noises

Noisy Noises is a 1929 Our Gang short silent comedy film …
Noisy Noises is a 1929 Our Gang short silent comedy film directed by Robert F. McGowan. It was the 82nd Our Gang short that was released.
  • Wikipedia
1925
Action Galore
MovieNov 3, 1925

Action Galore

A ranger out to capture a wanted criminal is shot at by a pretty …
A ranger out to capture a wanted criminal is shot at by a pretty young girl who mistakes him for a claim jumper.He is later ambushed and left for dead in a burning cabin by the man he's hunting, who his hiding out in a deserted mineshaft. Complications ensue.
  • IMDb
The Desert Demon
MovieOct 4, 1925

The Desert Demon

The Desert Demon released.
Big Red Riding Hood
www.imdb.com
MovieApr 26, 1925

Big Red Riding Hood

Jimmy is asked by the Swedish Government to translate for …
Jimmy is asked by the Swedish Government to translate for educational purpose "Little Red Riding Hood", but he can't afford to buy the book, so he tries reading it at the book shop, ...
  • IMDb
1924
Brothers Under the Chin
MovieApr 13, 1924

Brothers Under the Chin

Brothers Under the Chin released.
Zeb vs. Paprika
reelgood.com
MovieMar 16, 1924

Zeb vs. Paprika

Zeb vs. Paprika is a 1924 silent comedy film starring Stan …
Zeb vs. Paprika is a 1924 silent comedy film starring Stan Laurel. The film is a parody of the classic horse racing event on October 20, 1923, between American Kentucky Derby winner Zev and British Derby winner Papyrus, which attracted a crowd estimated at close to 50,000 people.
  • Wikipedia
Postage Due
www.imdb.com
MovieFeb 17, 1924

Postage Due

Willy Worst (Stan Laurel) is turning a local post office upside …
Willy Worst (Stan Laurel) is turning a local post office upside down and stirs up ill-feelings when trying to send a letter in POSTAGE DUE, a short produced by Hal Roach and directed by a former Keystone Kop.
  • IMDb
1923
The Soilers
www.imdb.com
MovieNov 25, 1923

The Soilers

Bob Canister has struck it rich in Alaska, but another man …
Bob Canister has struck it rich in Alaska, but another man learns of it, and steals Bob's claim with the help of a mercenary sheriff. Canister's men are ready to fight, but Bob backs down rather than resort to violence in front of his girlfriend. Later, though, he goes to the other man's home and confronts him, ready to fight for his claim.
  • IMDb
The Noon Whistle
MovieApr 29, 1923

The Noon Whistle

Stan Laurel's blundering worker drops all kinds of heavy …
Stan Laurel's blundering worker drops all kinds of heavy props on poor James Finlayson, the foreman of a failing lumber company that cannot possibly have enough insurance to cover all the pratfalls. You just knew that big bucket of hot glue was trouble.
  • IMDb
1922
The Black Bag
www.imdb.com
MovieJun 5, 1922

The Black Bag

Billy Kirkwood, a young businessman, travels to New …
Billy Kirkwood, a young businessman, travels to New York City for a vacation. There he comes to the rescue of pretty young Dorothy Calender, escorting her to a taxi because she was being followed by some sinister-looking men. It turns out that the men are thieves who have seen her take an expensive diamond necklace from a store, and are following her to steal it. However, all is not quite as it seems, as Billy is soon to find out.
  • IMDb
The Bride's Play
www.imdb.com
MovieJan 22, 1922

The Bride's Play

An Irish lass is torn between the poet who seduced her and …
An Irish lass is torn between the poet who seduced her and noble man who truly loves.
  • IMDb
1921
Why Girls Leave Home
www.imdb.com
MovieSep 4, 1921

Why Girls Leave Home

Why Girls Leave Home is a lost 1921 American silent drama …
Why Girls Leave Home is a lost 1921 American silent drama film produced by Harry Rapf for Warner Bros. It was the only film from the studio to make a profit in 1921. The poster for the film was featured in the 1962 film Gypsy.
  • Wikipedia
A Daughter of the Law
www.imdb.com
MovieJul 15, 1921

A Daughter of the Law

Eddie, the son of a police …
Eddie, the son of a police officer, gets involved with a criminal gang. His sister Nora finds him and tries to convince him to leave the gang, but he refuses, and his father will have nothing to do with him. Jim, Nora's boyfriend, discovers that the gang is planning to rob a house and he tips off the police. Things go horribly wrong, however, and the gang's members wind up kidnapping Nora and threatening to kill her unless her father helps free the rest of the gang from prison.
  • IMDb
Love's Penalty
www.imdb.com
MovieJun 1, 1921

Love's Penalty

Love's Penalty is a 1921 American drama film written and …
Love's Penalty is a 1921 American drama film written and directed by John Gilbert. The film stars Hope Hampton, Irma Harrison, Mrs. Phillip Landau, Percy Marmont, John B. O'Brien, and Virginia Valli. The film was released in June 1921, by Associated First National Pictures.
  • Wikipedia
Thunder Island
www.imdb.com
MovieJun 1, 1921

Thunder Island

Thunder Island released.
1920
The Stealers
en.wikipedia.org
MovieOct 3, 1920

The Stealers

The Stealers is a 1920 American silent drama film directed by …
The Stealers is a 1920 American silent drama film directed by Christy Cabanne.
  • Wikipedia
Bride 13
www.imdb.com
MovieSep 10, 1920

Bride 13

Bride 13 is a 1920 American thriller film serial directed by …
Bride 13 is a 1920 American thriller film serial directed by Richard Stanton, and the first film serial made by Fox. It is considered to be a lost film. Bride 13 was promoted as romantic film.
  • Wikipedia
Wings of Pride
MovieAug 1, 1920

Wings of Pride

Wings of Pride released.
1917
The Unforseen
MovieOct 22, 1917

The Unforseen

The Unforseen is a lost 1917 silent film drama directed by John …
The Unforseen is a lost 1917 silent film drama directed by John B. O'Brien and starring Olive Tell and David Powell. It was distributed through the Mutual Film Company. It is based on a 1903 Broadway play, The Unforeseen(spelling of play varies from the film), by Robert Marshall.
  • Wikipedia
Bab's Diary
en.wikipedia.org
MovieOct 7, 1917

Bab's Diary

Bab's Diary is a 1917 American silent romantic comedy film …
Bab's Diary is a 1917 American silent romantic comedy film directed by J. Searle Dawley, and starring Marguerite Clark. The film's scenario was written by Martha D. Foster, based on the screen story "Her Diary" by Mary Roberts Rinehart. This was the first in a trilogy of Babs films all starring Clark.
  • Wikipedia
Souls Triumphant
www.imdb.com
MovieMay 20, 1917

Souls Triumphant

Souls Triumphant released.
1916
Destiny's Toy
www.imdb.com
MovieJun 15, 1916

Destiny's Toy

Young Nan was rescued from a shipwreck by a man who …
Young Nan was rescued from a shipwreck by a man who becomes her foster father. Years later, when he dies, she moves to a nearby city and unknowingly gets involved with a criminal gang. When the gang attempts and fails to rob wealthy Thomas Carter's home, Nan finally discovers what they are and tells the police all she knows, resulting in the imprisonment of Bad Riley, the gang's leader. Grateful, the Carter family takes Nan into their home, to replace a young daughter who had drowned years before, and the young son, Rev. Robert Carter, begins a romance with her. However, the jailed Riley soon escapes and comes after Nan.
  • IMDb
The Flying Torpedo
en.wikipedia.org
MovieMar 12, 1916

The Flying Torpedo

In the future (1921), an alliance of several foreign countries plot …
In the future (1921), an alliance of several foreign countries plot to attack the US. American officials, coming to the realization that the country is basically defenseless, offer $1,000,000 to anyone who can come up with a weapon to defeat the invaders. Winthrop Clavering, a writer and inventor, hears of the reward and tells his friend Bartholomew Thompson, a scientist and inventor who has been working on developing flying torpedo. However, enemy agents have also heard about Thompson's project, and set out to kill him and steal his plans.
  • IMDb
The Little Mascot
MovieJan 16, 1916

The Little Mascot

The Little Mascot released.
The Foundling
www.imdb.com
MovieJan 2, 1916

The Foundling

After his beloved wife dies in childbirth, David King scorns …
After his beloved wife dies in childbirth, David King scorns his newborn daughter and leaves for Italy to pursue his artistic career. While King becomes a prominent painter, his child, called Molly O, grows up in an orphanage, unaware of her father's identity. When fame and fortune fail to bring him happiness, King fills with remorse and yearns for his forgotten daughter. Upon his return to New York, he inquires after Molly O at the orphanage, but is tricked into taking the director's illegitimate niece instead. Molly O now resides with Mrs. Grimes, a cruel boarding house mistress, who treats her more as a servant than a daughter. When Molly O tries to save her brood of puppies from the dog catcher, she meets King in the street, and he, taken with her charm, brings her to his home to live. Following a series of incidents involving the impostor daughter and her thieving mother, King discovers Molly O's real identity and happily reunites with her.
  • IMDb
1915
Captain Macklin
www.imdb.com
MovieApr 22, 1915

Captain Macklin

Royal Macklin, a cadet at WEst Point, is discharged for a …
Royal Macklin, a cadet at WEst Point, is discharged for a misdemeanor, and the father of Beatrice, Macklin's sweetheart, order her to break the engagement. Macklin goes to Honduras, in the midst of a revolution, and joins the Patriot army of General LaGuerre in the fight against Alvarez and his rebels. Macklin proves his valor in battle and saves the life of General Laguerre. But Beatrice and her father, having found that Macklin was innocent of the charge that caused his dismissal, are in Honduras and have been captured by Alvarez.
  • IMDb
The Legend Beautiful
MovieJan 4, 1915

The Legend Beautiful

Indolent Jose and industrious, avaricious Pietro, like Jacob …
Indolent Jose and industrious, avaricious Pietro, like Jacob and Esau, are brothers. Rachel loves Jose, but admires Pietro for his enterprise. However, she refuses to marry either of them. The Padre suggests to the boys' aged father, that he tell his sons that the neglected fields have gold in them, in order to rouse Jose. Pietro immediately applies himself to searching for the gold, and in his greed deserts his father, who is cared for on his dying bed by Jose. Rachel at last consents to marry Jose, and Pietro, seeing that he is about to lose the girl, drugs his brother's wine and induces him to sell his share of the patrimony. Jose, on coming to himself, in shame and despair, wanders away. Returning a few weeks later, he learns that that very hour his brother has married Rachel. He goes to a certain rock and putting the gold he has received from Pietro underneath, with a note swearing revenge to the death, he cunningly informs his brother that there is one rock he has overlooked. Pietro and his bride discover the money and the challenge. Several years later finds Pietro reduced to poverty and stricken with illness. Jose, well-armed with gold and thirsty for his long-plotted revenge, sends his knife to his brother by a traveler, and then, stopping at the cottage which was once his home, he falls asleep. Meanwhile, Leah, the eight-year-old child of Pietro, has been listening to the Padre's story of the Legend Beautiful. She comes to the cottage with her basket full of bread and lilies and wakens the sleeping stranger. He hears with amazement that she is his brother's child, and her recital of the legend stirs him to repentance. Falling on his knees in the hut, he is vouchsafed a vision of the Christ. Then he hastens to Pietro's house and clasping his brother in his arms, begs his forgiveness. Not long after, Pietro succumbs to his sickness. On the threshold of taking holy orders, Jose learns of his brother's death. He and Rachel at last are united.
  • IMDb
1914
The Folly of Anne
MovieNov 14, 1914

The Folly of Anne

Anne leaves her country town to embark upon a career as a …
Anne leaves her country town to embark upon a career as a writer in the city. She takes a hall bedroom and applies herself to her stories. The landlady is dubious. Anne goes to a publisher and is turned down. She goes to a second publisher and meets with the same fate. It gets to be an old story after a while, and her fund of money is almost gone. One by one she burns her manuscripts to heat soup, until she has but one story left. The landlady demands the rent in advance, and Anne is evicted. Chased from stoop to stoop by the policeman, she at length finds the key of one of the houses under the doormat and takes refuge inside. The young man, who is the owner of the place, presently returns to get some articles he has forgotten. Not finding the key, he enters through the window and Anne takes him for a burglar. She sees him putting things in his suit case. Finding an old revolver, she holds him up, and proposes that he teach her to be a burglar too. He enjoys the joke awhile, then he tells Anne who he is. She recognizes the name of a publisher who ninety-nine times has turned down her literary efforts by mail. Handing him the last story remaining, she compels him to sit down then and there and read it. Thus begins a romance which makes Anne's career a double success.
  • IMDb
The Second Mrs. Roebuck
MovieAug 23, 1914

The Second Mrs. Roebuck

Mabel Mack's mother is …
Mabel Mack's mother is deserted by her father and the mother dies. All that Mabel retains of her family history is a group photograph of her father, mother and herself, in a locket which she always wears. Mabel becomes a stenographer for the rich Samuel Roebuck and marries him, becoming a second mother to his little girl, who has learned to love her when visiting her father at the office. The marriage is a bitter blow to Roebuck's sister Katherine, who has been the mistress of the house since the death of his first wife. Previous to the marriage of Roebuck and Mabel, Roebuck had objected to an intimacy between Katherine and an actor named Francis Carryl. He had forbidden Katherine to have anything more to do with Carryl, and as Katherine was dependent on her brother, she has pretended to obey. After the marriage of Roebuck and Mabel, Katherine seeks in every way to humiliate Mabel on account of her uncultured ways. Mabel learns of Katherine's secret intimacy with Carryl, who desires to marry her on account of her supposed wealth. When Mabel discovers that Carryl is her own father, she realizes what a blow it will be to her husband to have his sister marry such a scoundrel and she interferes, warning Carryl not to carry out his intentions. But Katherine naturally misunderstands the evident recognition of Carryl and Mabel and is filled with jealousy and rage. She repudiates Carryl and telephones for Roebuck for the purpose of exposing his wife's supposed previous relations with Carryl. Roebuck arrives and Carryl is forced, by the group photograph, to acknowledge himself as Mabel's father. Roebuck forgives Mabel. Carryl slinks away and Katherine finding herself whipped humbly bows to the inevitable. Mabel permits her husband to think that it was she who had come to meet Carryl, her father, and that Mabel's only offense had been that she had supposed Mabel was meeting a lover and had sought to expose her. Thus Katherine's intended elopement is kept a secret and she becomes Mabel's friend.
  • IMDb
The Angel of Contention
www.imdb.com
MovieJul 5, 1914

The Angel of Contention

Nettie is beloved by all the …
Nettie is beloved by all the boys in the mining camp. Magoon, a big, jovial miner, loves her most of all, however, and asks her to become his wife. Nettie is in love with Colter, a young Easterner, and though it pains her to do so, tells Magoon of the fact. Magoon leaves town to become sheriff of the adjoining county. A murder is committed in the mining camp, and Colter is unjustly accused. Nettie rescues him from jail and sends him to Magoon. The sheriff with admirable self-sacrifice hides his rival, and, when the posse arrives, points out what Nettie has done for the boys of the mining camp. Colter is released, and all the boys escort him back to Nettie.
  • IMDb
1911
A Western Redemption
www.imdb.com
MovieOct 21, 1911

A Western Redemption

Tom Perkins, a Chicago youth, is arrested, charged with being …
Tom Perkins, a Chicago youth, is arrested, charged with being one of the carbarn bandits, to whom is attributed a series of bold robberies. The disgraced parents also suffer for their son's crimes, the elder Perkins being thrown out of a job, and they are forced to leave their rented cottage, on account of the bad character of their son. Perkins and his wife then go west to begin life anew. Tom, liberated from prison, goes west and becomes a bandit. He and his pal, Steve Ray, rob an express office in a general store, which is in charge of Tom's father, though the fact is unknown to Tom. Later, when he discovers that he has robbed his own father, he forces Ray to accompany him to the sheriff's office, where Tom confesses and asks that they be made to pay for their crime. In later years, when Tom is again released, he seeks out his parents, and having given proof of his reformation, obtains their blessing.
  • IMDb
Spike Shannon's Last Fight
www.imdb.com
MovieAug 26, 1911

Spike Shannon's Last Fight

'Spike' Shannon, a pugilist by …
'Spike' Shannon, a pugilist by occupation, signs to fight a 10-round bout, with another young knight of the ring. A contract is drawn and 'Spike' and his backers leave the office of the promoter. On the street they encounter a young couple, evidently at outs, but which proves later, upon the girl's explanation, to be a flirtation, in which she has no desire to take part. The masher has insolently insulted her. 'Spike' takes in the situation at once and with his strong right arm knocks the dude sprawling. 'Spike' then offers to assist the young lady with her basket of washing and is graciously permitted. At the girl's home Nora Flannigan introduces the young Irishman to her mother, who says he may be permitted to call. The affair ends in 'Spike' throwing up the 'sponge' to the little god Cupid and the two are engaged to be married, when the catastrophe occurs. On the day of the match she learns that he is a pugilist and in tears tells him that he must either give up the fight or give her up, which he at first reluctantly refuses to do, but later visits the promoter at the club's training quarters and tells this official he refuses to go into the ring. Six months later finds the young couple married. Nora is ill and only an expensive operation can save her life. In desperation 'Spike' finally goes to the office of the promoter and asks an opportunity to go into the ring again. The promoter refuses him, but 'Spike is given a chance when Joe, one of the combatants of a bout scheduled to be fought that night is hurt and 'Spike' put in his place. The fight scenes in this picture are remarkably realistic, and the bout going four rounds, in which 'Spike,' after a hard battle, is the victor, thus winning enough money to pay for the operation, which saves Nora's life.
  • IMDb
Alkali Ike's Auto
www.imdb.com
MovieMay 20, 1911

Alkali Ike's Auto

Both "Alkali" and "Mustang" Pete loved Betty Brown, and the …
Both "Alkali" and "Mustang" Pete loved Betty Brown, and the lady had her hands full in keeping the lovers from shooting each other. One day "Alkali" called on Betty with a pair of handsome saddle horses and asked her to go riding with him. She agreed, but the resourceful "Mustang," driving up with a handsome horse and carriage, carried off the lady. "Alkali" goes to the village inn, inclined to drink himself to death, but finally trades for an old junk automobile his two horses, and clambering in the seat, starts in pursuit of his rival and the lady. Overtaking them, he has no difficulty in persuading Betty to ride with him. But the auto breaks down and "Alkali," endeavoring to fix it, turns on the juice and the rattle-trap car starts down the trail at lightning speed, leaving "Alkali" behind. After a thrilling and exciting ride the car is ditched and poor Betty is thrown headlong into the road.
  • IMDb
Across the Plains
MovieApr 1, 1911

Across the Plains

Jennie Lee and her father are on their way to Golden …
Jennie Lee and her father are on their way to Golden California, from a little Kansas farm, traveling in a prairie schooner. At the last settlement visited by the two, the old man, who has a weakness for drink, purchases several bottles of whiskey, which he begins drinking when they have made camp for the night. A lone cowboy calls upon them and finds the old man in a jovial mood and cautions him to beware of the hostile tribe of Indians, through whose country they are now traveling. Unmindful of the warning, Lee continues to drink until thoroughly intoxicated, despite the pleadings of his daughter. Suddenly over the brow of a hill a scouting Indian is seen to appear, sees the wagon and the drunken white, and slipping cautiously away, goes to his Indian village, where he informs the other braves of the trespassing settlers. The Indians leap astride their shaggy pones and with was whoops ride off to make short work of the whites. The girl sees them coming and implores her father to get into the wagon, but he refuses and the girl, knowing that she must act quickly if she would save her own life, springs into the wagon, seizes the reins and urges the horses to their utmost speed. After a long and thrilling ride in which the Indians gradually gain on her, she is joined by the friendly cowboy, who sends a crony who was with him, to a neighboring ranch for help. The girl and cowboy race the Indians and pull up at a deserted shack in which they protect themselves against the Indians until the arrival of the ranchmen, who disperse the Indians. The girl expresses her great joy at being rescued and upon proposal of her cowboy protector that she marry him, she readily agrees.
  • IMDb
1910
Hank and Lank: As Sandwich Men
MovieNov 22, 1910

Hank and Lank: As Sandwich Men

Hank and Lank have inside …
Hank and Lank have inside information that it's meal time, but it looks as if they would have to skip a meal or two until Hank's fertile brain maps out a royal road to a big feed. Into the "Ragout Restaurant" goes Hank, and soon returns wearing a pair of large signboards proclaiming the goodness of the bill of fare at the eating house. Hank is rewarded by a fine feed, for he has managed to steer a large crowd to the restaurant. Now it's Lank's turn. He has seen how easily Hank earned the big eats, and loses no time in applying to the "Apax" restaurant. They have seen that the rival house has increased its patronage by advertising, and Lank soon is at large upon the community with a pair of boards upon which the name "Apax" appears in large letters. But carrying the heavy sandwich is strenuous work, and Lank stops frequently to rest. While loafing on a corner two boys, intent upon mischief, fix upon him as a likely victim. A painter happens along at this moment, and they appropriate his paint and brushes. Stealing up behind the unsuspecting Lank, they quickly obliterate the letter "X" from his sign. Lank innocently strolls away, followed by Hank, who has come upon the scene in time to see the fun. Lank's wanderings lead him to an alley where a gang of Irish laborers are eating their noonday lunch. Lank thinks that this is an auspicious place to display the restaurant ad, and walks boldly by. However, these loyal sons of Erin do not welcome an invitation to eat at the "A.P.A." restaurant. A box of newly mixed mortar is convenient for their purposes, and Lank is treated to a most "mortarfying" bath in the plastic material.
  • IMDb
Pals of the Range
www.imdb.com
MovieOct 22, 1910

Pals of the Range

The scene opens in the bunk house of the Lazy K Ranch, where …
The scene opens in the bunk house of the Lazy K Ranch, where we see Jack Hartley and his pal Jack Smythe. Hartley has just received a letter from the east, in which his mother asks him for money. Hartley is much depressed. He is broke and sees no immediate prospect of recouping his fortunes. Smythe, learning of Hartley's dilemma, offers his roll to his pal, who gratefully accepts it. Some time later the two boys meet Clara, the daughter of a neighboring ranchman, and both fall in love with her. For a time it seems a fair field and no favor, but at last she seems to show preference for Smythe. The two boys discuss the matter at the bunk house, and decide to write her letters of proposal and abide by her decision. They write and mail their letters, and she replies, accepting Smythe. Hartley goes for the mail, and his weak nature asserting itself, he surreptitious opens the letters before returning to the ranch house. His own letter is superscribed "Dear Jack," and reading it he finds that he is rejected. The other letter, accepting Smythe, is headed "To My Sweetheart," and Hartley sees the possibility of changing the letters in their respective envelopes and so making Smythe believe that he is the rejected one. He puts his plan into operation, and Smythe, upon receiving his letter of rejection, immediately announces his intention of going prospecting into the desert, He leaves at once, never suspecting the treachery of his pal, and the girl, believing herself jilted, is easily persuaded to marry Hartley. After the wedding the latter's conscience troubles him to such an extent that he confesses his miserable deed, and Clara, turning upon him in indignation and disgust, demands that he at once go into the desert and bring Smythe back to her. Cowering before her indignation, he goes in search of his pal. Smythe, prospecting in the burning desert, is beset by Indians, and although he escapes with his life, they get his horse and pack mules. He makes a running fight of it, holding them back with difficulty, and, at last, exhausted, and almost dead of thirst, he is about to give up the unequal fight when Hartley arrives. Hartley at once rides to the defense of his pal and together they hold back the savages for a time, but Hartley is wounded. He realizes that both of them cannot escape, and urges his pal to take the horse and make his escape. Smythe at last does so, and Hartley, covering the other's retreat, is killed by the attacking Indians, but not before he knows that he has saved the life of his pal and so made restitution for his treachery.
  • IMDb
A Flirty Affliction
MovieSep 21, 1910

A Flirty Affliction

Pretty Molly is afflicted with a peculiar nervous disease and …
Pretty Molly is afflicted with a peculiar nervous disease and after having tried many doctors is finally referred to a certain great specialist, who has had success with cases similar to her own. To briefly describe Molly's ailment would be in stating that the muscles of her throat and neck were uncontrollable, causing her to throw back her head in a way resembling a person beckoning to another. Molly goes to see the doctor, who expresses himself able to cure the case and prescribes certain medicine. But as Molly turns to go the unruly head is thrown back and the old M.D. is almost convinced the young lady is flirting with him. As Molly passes through the reception room where one or two young gentlemen are waiting to see the doctor, the peculiar nod is again repeated and the young fellows, each believing the nod to be an invitation, rise and precipitately follow her out. On the street Molly causes more excitement when she appears to solicit the company of a dignified lawyer, who, nevertheless, likes her looks and starts off after her until he is summarily dismissed with the threat of arrest for annoying a perfectly respectable young lady. An innocent mail man is the next victim, and he is similarly dispensed with. An old chap in the company of his wife is also beguiled by the unfortunate girl's peculiar nod and receives a sound berating not only from her but from his watchful spouse. Even Hans, the little bass drummer of the German band, is bewitched by the involuntary Circe and gets his drum smashed for his trouble. The climax comes when Officer O'Rourke falls a victim to the young lady's nod and is told that his services as a protector are certainly not needed. During the argument the captain, O'Rourke's superior, comes on the scene and orders the patrolman on his way. The girl has reached home and she thanks the captain for his protection. But as she opens the door those unruly muscles work again and the captain accepts the invitation. This is the last hope, and the poor girl slams the door in the captain's face.
  • IMDb
The Pony Express Rider
MovieSep 17, 1910

The Pony Express Rider

"Pony" O'Brien, or Number 3 …
"Pony" O'Brien, or Number 3 of the relay between two desert-bound western cities, draws his horse before his sweetheart's house and lingers somewhat longer with his packet of mail as he tells her the good news of a raise in salary which means they will soon be ready to marry. The girl is delighted and her father, coming on the scene, congratulates them and gives them his blessing. "Pony" is hardly on his way again when Jim Allison, a puncher employed by Holmes, the girl's father, approaches Mary and hesitatingly asks her to marry him. At the girl's refusal and her confession that she is already engaged, Allison turns angrily on his heel, fully resolved to leave the ranch. He looks up the old man and tells him his intentions. Holmes coolly hands him his pay and asks for no explanation. Allison, he believes, is not trustworthy, and his going is good riddance. Some time later Allison is stopped by two highwaymen, ordered to dismount and is dragged off by them through a winding, rocky defile which ends abruptly in a small cavern. Entering the cavern, Allison makes out in the uncertain light the vague figures of a half dozen men who spring to their feet and draw their revolvers. The appearance of the other two, however, puts them at ease, and their attitude of defense gives way to curiosity. Allison soon learns that the leader of the gang is "Red" Patterson, a bandit, whose name is the terror of every household in the vicinity. Batterson asks him to choose between death and loyalty to the gang, and Allison chooses the latter. The next day the bandit puts him to test by ordering him to "get" "Pony" O'Brien, the express rider. Allison mounts his horse and rides away, fixing his destination at the post station where he knows "Pony" will make his start on the long ride through the mountains. "Pony" is soon seen to mount his horse, while Allison watches and sets out cautiously on his trail. At a lonely place in the mountains he overtakes the rider, orders him from his horse and viciously knocks him senseless with the butt of his pistol. A second later, with the express rider's bag, he mounts his horse and tears down the trail to the rendezvous of the bandits. Batterson is pleased with the success of his new recruit, but is doubly surprised when this latter, opening the flap of the mail bag, sees something which causes him to suddenly change his purpose. Quick as a flash he draws his revolver and with the surprised crowd covered he backs out of the den, leaps on his horse and rides away. He finds the rider still unconscious by the side of the road, and hurrying off through the bushes brings back his hat full of water, which soon revives him. "Pony" mechanically feels for his gun, but the other man waves it back. "I want that picture of Mary," he says, indicating the photo of Mary, pasted inside the rider's bag flap. Then he goes on to explain his love for the girl, his rejection by her and his short career as a bandit He don't want to go bad; he wants the picture of Mary to keep him straight. "Pony" gives him the picture, stretches out his hand, and then the two part.
  • IMDb
He Met the Champion
MovieSep 14, 1910

He Met the Champion

Willie Nutt, an aspirant to athletic honors, thinks he sees some …
Willie Nutt, an aspirant to athletic honors, thinks he sees some easy money when he reads Professor Brawn's notice in the lobby of a theater offering $100 to anyone who will put him on his back. Willie resolves to make a try, and passing a book store observes in the window a volume labeled, "How to Wrestle." No sooner seen than bought, and Willie immediately goes into training. Willie reads the book as he walks home, and becomes interested in the passage, "grab your opponent by the calf of the left leg and force him on his knee." Willie wants to experiment, and a passing Chinaman, with a bundle of wash on his back, is the victim. The two are soon struggling together, and a lively match ensues until the Chinaman breaks away and runs down the street yelling "murder" and "police." Willie's next victim is an automobilist, stretched out under his machine, hammering at a loose bolt. Willie drags the chauffeur from under the machine, throws down a blanket for a mat and proceeds to lay about the surprised fellow for all he is worth. The autoist resents the attack, however, and Willie is somewhat the worse for the encounter when he is kicked on his way. Willie's other victims are a chap scrubbing a walk, a woman beating a carpet and a young fellow washing windows. Willie gets off comparatively easy with the two former, but when the window washer gets him he hurls him through the window onto a dining table, demolishing an excellent repast. He does not linger long, however, but is hurled out the window again, bruised and sore. After other adventures Willie feels he has had sufficient training and goes to the theater to meet the champion. When the usual invitation is extended the audience, Willie is on his feet and with his valuable book in his hand goes to meet the champion. The following scene is one of the funniest ever. Willie constantly consults his book, and is an easy mark for the big wrestler. The latter finally takes him by the neck, hurls him around his head several times and deposits him on the mat, flat on his back. After some time Willie is able to arise and then and there makes the solemn resolve: "Never again!"
  • IMDb
Under Western Skies
www.imdb.com
MovieAug 6, 1910

Under Western Skies

Kate Allison, an exceptionally beautiful western girl, is …
Kate Allison, an exceptionally beautiful western girl, is engaged to marry a young easterner, a long-time family friend. In the first scene the fiancé is bidding his sweetheart good-bye and he is to be accompanied to the station by his prospective father-in-law. The girl is left alone with a warning that should she be molested by any of the crowd of drunken cowpunchers who would be returning from a dance at a neighboring ranch, not to hesitate to shoot. We arc next shown three young punchers, all intoxicated, riding up to the door of the cottage. All dismount, and one, peering into the window, sees the girl alone. Reelingly they enter to find the girl covering them with a Winchester, but the foremost of the gang strides forward and before she can pull the trigger jerks the gun from her hands. The punchers resolve to play a game of poker to see who will win the young lady. A greasy pack is brought forth and the game starts. The girl sees the desperateness of the situation and resolves to employ desperate means in protecting herself. A card falls on the floor from the hand of the puncher nearest her, and seizing it she scribbles a line across the face and slips it into the puncher's hands. It reads: "I will be yours in marriage if you will protect me from the others." The puncher reads the note, covertly watching the others, then as he looks at the girl a new sensation sweeps over his soul and he nods his head. He starts an altercation, accusing one of the others of cheating, which ends in all the punchers leaving the room to settle the dispute at twenty paces, in the old-fashioned and gentlemanly way. When the puncher returns to the girl he is alone. He tells her she must now make good her promise and swears faithfully to make himself worthy of her. She nods her head, but it is a look of hatred and scorn which she fastens on him as they leave. They are married and go to the cowpuncher's quarters. He apologizes for his poverty but repeats his promise to make her happy if she will give him a chance. Yet she steadfastly refuses to allow him to make love to her. A few months drag by and the former fiancé of the girl traces her to her new home. He demands an explanation and asks her if she loves her husband. She answers angrily that she does not and then eagerly accepts his invitation to return east with him. Without horses or other conveyances it is almost impossible for them to cross the strip of desert which separates them from her father's home, but they resolve to attempt the journey. On the way they become lost, and the last drop of the canteen, which her fiancé had selfishly drained himself, finds them in desperate straits and facing the most cruel of all deaths. The girl stumbles and begs for his assistance, but the panic-stricken young fellow refuses. They stumble upon the bones of a horse and the shock of this sight is the last straw on the camel's back and the girl totters to the ground in a faint. The young fellow offers no assistance, but staggers desperately on. An hour later, dazed and blindly tottering, he falls into the arms of a young prospector, who, after giving the young man restoratives, learns of the woman lost on the trail. The young prospector hurries back on the path indicated by the young fellow and an hour later staggers back into camp with the young girl in his arms. She has regained her senses and recognizes in the prospector her deserted husband. The cowardly young fiancé then asks the girl to go on with him, but she refuses and clings to her husband, whom she has vowed to love and obey forever after.
  • IMDb
The Ranchman's Feud
www.imdb.com
MovieJun 11, 1910

The Ranchman's Feud

Hiram Matthews, a western ranchman, owns an apple …
Hiram Matthews, a western ranchman, owns an apple orchard which borders on the property of Jesse Forsyth. The former and his wife are picking apples in the orchard from a tree, the branches of which droop over the fence of the Forsyth property. Forsyth and Matthews have never been on good terms and when the former, who has brooded long over supposed ills done him by Matthews, finds this latter and his wife trespassing on his property, he orders them off at the point of a shotgun. Matthews argues that as the tree is planted upon his ground he is the owner of the fruit on the branches which overlap the two properties. The other man disagrees and threatens to shoot Matthews if he dares trespass. Matthews summons the sheriff, who advises him to go to law. Matthews' son now returns from an eastern college and, unaware of the enmity between his father and Forsyth, meets the latter's daughter. It is a case of love at first sight, but Forsyth coming on the scene of the tete-a-tete, orders his enemy's son from the premises and drags the girl into the house. Young Jack Matthews goes home and persuades his father to call on Forsyth, and endeavors to patch up the old misunderstanding. Matthews agrees and goes to the Forsyth homestead and offers to forget old misunderstandings and to be friends, but Forsyth is obstinate and refuses to shake hands. The next day young Jack dispatches a boy with a note for Nellie, Forsyth's daughter. The note is delivered, but the girl's father, slipping quietly upon her, suspects that the note is from Jack and as she walks away toward the trysting place he follows stealthily after. Jack meets the girl and they are again at their love-making when Forsyth, enraged at young Matthews' persistency, breaks up the scene and again orders Jack away. The latter argues with the old man and follows him away as he drags Nellie towards the house. There is another argument and Forsyth draws his revolver and shoots the young lover. Jack makes his way home and is carried into the house by his father's sympathetic cowboys. The elder Matthews then organizes a little party of his own and rides away to get the sheriff, after which they ride to the Forsyth's. The old man is expecting them and when they slip quietly upon the house they find the grim looking muzzle of the old man's Winchester thrust out at the open window and pointed threateningly at them. Nellie comes on the scene and offers to talk with her father. In the end he is pacified and offers to accompany the sheriff to the Matthews' home. He is taken before Jack, who, realizing that Nellie will suffer if he incriminates the old man, refuses to identify Forsyth as his assailant. Forsyth, much to the regret of the boys and the elder Mathews is allowed to go. The next day Jack suffers a relapse and is taken with a violent fever, raging in his delirium and calling for his sweetheart, Nellie. The doctor thinks that the only hope for the boy is to see Forsyth's daughter and upon his advice Mrs. Matthews, accompanied by a cowboy, calls on Forsyth. She pleads for him to let Nellie accompany her that her boy's life may be saved, which, after some argument, he agrees to do. Nellie even persuades him to join them. In the end Jack is apparently well on the road to recovery when Nellie slips tenderly into his arms, and the two old men are brought together by the girl, who makes them promise that in the future they will be nothing but the best of pals and pardners.
  • IMDb
Away Out West
www.imdb.com
MovieJun 4, 1910

Away Out West

The opening scene of the story is in a Nevada mining town, the …
The opening scene of the story is in a Nevada mining town, the hub of the gold center. Herbert Mills, a young chap from the east, with his partner, Walter Daniels, an experienced miner, are about to set out on a prospecting trip through the mountains. There is the usual hustle and bustle in loading the pack mules with their paraphernalia and the next scene finds them well on the trail, a scarcely discernible thread winding up through the mountains. Later in the day they draw up at a miner's hut and are attracted by the voice of an aged miner. They enter and find the old prospector very close to death. Daniels shows his surliness and hard-heartedness in advising his pal to let the old chap die, but Mills waves him aside and administers to the enfeebled old man. The latter is revived, but knowing that his life is fast drawing to a close, brings out a chart describing a mine, stating that it is very rich. The chart is delivered to young Mills, who eases the old man in his last battle with life, then withdraws to show the partner that kindness is sometimes very richly rewarded. The next evening finds the two prospectors in the middle of the desert but still a day's journey to the mine as described in the old miner's chart. After tethering their burros and making camp for the night they turn in for much-needed sleep. Young Daniels awakens in the night and is seized with an evil desire to rob his partner of the latter's share in the mine. While Mills is soundly sleeping, Daniels steals the chart from the sleeping man's pocket, packs up the mules with such tools and other material as he may need, and slips quietly away, after emptying Mills' water canteen. In the early morning Mills awakens and discovers his partner's treachery, that he has been left to die in the desert. He realizes the horror of the situation, but summoning his courage he strikes off through the desert, following the faint trail taken by his partner. Suddenly all trace of the trail vanishes and he awakens to the fact that he is hopelessly lost. The blazing sun on his back and the hot ankle-deep dust of alkali and sand underfoot soon exhaust him and he drops in a crumpled heap, desperately tired and thirsty. In the meantime Daniels has arrived at the mine and is gloating over the prospects of his gobbling the entire riches. He enters the dim cave and disappears in the darkness. Next is shown a scene, taken within the mine, of the figure of Daniels silhouetted against the narrow shaft of light making his way into the mine. The following scene is one of the cleverest bits of camera work ever seen in moving picture; the interior of the mine. Here Daniels discovers the rich pay-streak and makes a hasty calculation of the immense wealth the mine contains. But he has no sooner touched the gold than a blinding light flashes above him and he sees in a vision his comrade Mills, lying unconscious under the blazing sun on the desert sand. There follows a fight in the man's soul between conscience and avaricious greed. But in the end the former conquers and Daniels, sorry and repentant, hurries out of the mine, saddles a horse and hurries to the rescue of his comrade. He finds him unconscious, just as the vision had pictured, but not beyond his aid. Water and food soon revive him and Daniels, hoisting him into the saddle, drives hurriedly back to the mine and reveals the vast wealth it contains. Then, to make up for his blackguardly action of the night before, he offers Mills the whole mine and declares he will withdraw, but Mills forgives him and insists on his staying. The affair ends with the two shaking hands and avowing eternal comradeship, not to again be severed by selfish greed.
  • IMDb
The Bad Man and the Preacher
MovieApr 16, 1910

The Bad Man and the Preacher

"Snake" Williams, typical bad …
"Snake" Williams, typical bad man, and a little group of cowboys are found loitering lazily about the Snakeville, Ariz. barroom, when the noon-day stage coach out of Phoenix rumbles around pike and deposits one lone passenger. Interest is immediately aroused and as the stage coach pulls out, Snake, the constant bully, sidles up to the newly arrived stranger to inquire the latter's business, explaining at the same time that although the town has no mayor or reception committee, he will be pleased to do the honors. Following the statement Snake invites the stranger into the "Silver Dollar" for any refreshments the gentleman might desire, with the recommendation that "Old Henry" is about the best the "Silver Dollar" affords. "I am a minister of the Gospel," answers the Rev. James Smyth, "I do not indulge in liquor of any kind." This blunt affront almost sweeps the bully off his feet, while the other boys gather about to view the poor and indiscreet pastor's quick extermination. But before Snake has an opportunity to vent his wrath, Rev. Smyth turns on his heel and disappears around the corner. Two days later we find the Rev. Smyth in front of the little frame church posting a notice to the effect that, "Services will be held here today at 2 P.M." extending an invitation to all to attend. Snake Williams, who fears that the affront from the preacher might question his title, calls his little crowd of bad men together and announces solemnly that no services will be held in Mustang this day. With his rowdies at his heels he rides off to the little frame church and proceeds to riddle the notice with bullets from his Colts. The services are in progress and shortly after the shots are fired the preacher comes out, demanding to know the reason for this desecration of the Sabbath. Snake starts a row and forces the preacher into a fistic battle. The two fight strenuously, Snake sometimes on top, sometimes the preacher. But in the end a straight-from-the-shoulder wallop sends Snake rolling in the dust and the awed cowboys, seeing their chief defeated, rally to the preacher's standard and finally enter the church, leaving Snake and Rev. Smyth to further discuss matters. "Preacher," says Snake, condescendingly, "you're a wonder, an' if you'll forgive a pore sinner..." Rev. Smyth stretches out his hand. Snake grasps it gratefully and upon the pastor's invitation enters the church.
  • IMDb
The Ranger's Bride
www.imdb.com
MovieApr 9, 1910

The Ranger's Bride

The story concerns Bill Dunham, a droll cow-puncher, who finds …
The story concerns Bill Dunham, a droll cow-puncher, who finds that home without a wife may have its advantages, "but durned few," and a good woman who can sew on buttons and make flapjacks is worth more than much silver and gold and the liberties of single blessedness. Opportunity knocks at Bill's door. Indeed, it comes in the form, almost, of a veritable slap in the face, a flagrant dare, an invitation as a guest of honor at Dame Opportunity's table, and it comes at the psychological moment when Bill is struggling with a shirt that needs mending and in the form of an advertisement in the "Mustang Bugle" to the effect that "a lone spinster, with a large fortune, who can cook and sew, desires a husband." So Bill writes a letter to the spinster stating that he will be her tootsum henceforth and forever more, with instructions how to reach the village of Mustang. Bill's secret, however, becomes public property when the boys, his pals, follow him to the mail box and get the letter. It is a revelation and a surprise to think that their Bill would make a matrimonial venture. No! No! Something must be done to prevent the marriage. There is much scheming among them before the day the spinster is, or was, due to arrive, and in the meantime the boys have hatched up a good scheme. Bill arises early on the day of his wedding, makes a grand toilet, dons a "biled" shirt and enlists the help of the boys in getting into a white collar. In the meantime two of the boys have rigged out, one as a woman and the other as a clergyman, with female and clerical garb, respectively. At last the stage is due and the spinster and clergyman ride down to meet it. The two are loaded into the stage and the other boys return to get the groom. Bill is reluctant about parting with his gun, but who ever heard or wearing artillery to a wedding? However, it is impossible to persuade him to part with his chaps, and it is an amazing spectacle he presents, togged out in an outrageous costume, half dress suit and half cowboy costume! In the end he meets the spinster, an affectionate creature with a face like a hatchet. Bill is paralyzed when he sees her, and when the parson steps forth to officiate, Bill breaks loose from the boys and runs down the road, wildly shouting for help, with the boys, the spinster and the parson in pursuit. After a comical chase, Bill, whose short legs and heavy body will not permit him to cover much ground, is overhauled and forced to marry the spinster. But when he is left alone with the damsel something about the makeup of the latter arouses his suspicions, and jerking off his pal's wig the revelation is complete. At first inclined to fight, he is soon pacified, and laughs at the joke, happy to think that it is a joke. In the end Bill is completely cured of "that lovin' feelin'" and resolves that single blessedness with its many disadvantages is better than taking a hand in the game of matrimony.
  • IMDb
Method in His Madness
MovieMar 16, 1910

Method in His Madness

A doddering old gentleman, …
A doddering old gentleman, out for his morning's constitutional, suffers an attack of epilepsy in front of a saloon in the country town. Pedestrians run to his rescue and the barkeeper of the saloon brings out a good jolt of whiskey to revive the stricken one. A tramp who has noted the accident, has also mentally noted the glass of whiskey, and being thirsty for a drink himself, he turns away, a brilliant scheme revolving in his mind. A few minutes later the tramp in passing another saloon is seen to fall and go into violent contortions. A crowd gathers and the saloonkeeper comes out with the dose of whiskey. "Weary" is delighted, and meeting an old tramp friend of his, puts him wise to the little game. They return to the first saloon and the second tramp has a fit. The unsuspecting bartender comes out with the usual glass of whiskey, and the tramp is revived. The bartender, however, sees into their scheme and watches them heading for the saloon further down the street. "Weary" and his pal, under the influence of the first drinks, have grown reckless and resolve to work the trick on every saloon in the community. They return to saloon number two, but the bartender of saloon number one has beat them there and put his competitor next to the tramps' scheme. Both tramps go into violent fits and the saloonkeepers rush out. Each carries a seltzer bottle and it is not booze, but a cold spray of seltzer, that restores the two tramps to their senses.
  • IMDb
The Mexican's Faith
www.imdb.com
MovieFeb 26, 1910

The Mexican's Faith

Tony Perez, a Mexican cowpuncher, is driven from …
Tony Perez, a Mexican cowpuncher, is driven from the ranch where he is employed for some misdemeanor or other, and after vainly endeavoring to find work, tries the gate of Dan Farman's ranch, "The Mosquito," and applies for a job. His hard luck story rings true and old Dan, who is of a charitable turn, puts the Mexican to work. Alice Farman, the daughter and "flower of the ranch," is in love with Nat Michaels, the ranch foreman. Perez, who has seen Alice from time to time, becomes deeply infatuated with the girl, and one day when he encounters her alone, he voices his passionate love. The girl shakes her head and scorns him. Perez then insults the girl and attempts to kiss her. A darkey servant, who has been near, sees this, and running to the bunkhouse, summons a number of cowboys. Alice, raging with indignation, tells them that the Mexican had insulted her. The mounted cowboys ask where Perez has gone and when she indicates that he has run to his cabin, they ride off in that direction, telling her they will attend to the "dirty greaser." An hour later they return, with the despairing Mexican their prisoner. He is lashed to hitching post, while one of the cowboys summons Alice. The Mexican is sentenced to a fearful horse-whipping and Alice is invited to administer the lashes, but she revolts against this brutal treatment. The Mexican begs for mercy and finally she forces the cowboys to release him. Perez is immediately reformed and becomes a most faithful and valuable servant. Several weeks elapse and Dick Chalmers, an easterner, arrives at the ranch. He falls in love with Alice, but each proposal he makes is refused by her. The girl at last is forced to confess to her fiancé the annoying attentions paid her by Chalmers, and Michaels, very indignant, tells her that he will make short work of the easterner if he persist in his insults toward her. Chalmers, who is "black" clean through, resolves to have Alice at any price. He engages a Mexican greaser to help him and together they kidnap the girl and carry her to a deserted cabin. Tony Perez, however, has followed them to the cabin and overpowering the Mexican, who is acting as sentinel at the door, rushes into the shack in time to spare Alice from any further indignities at the hands of Chalmers. Perez's knife flashes and would have made quick work of Chalmers had Alice not interfered. Tony understands and draws back, slipping the knife into its sheath. Then Chalmers, realizing his narrow escape, hastily rises and slinks out of the cabin. Tony sinks on his knee and kisses the girl's hand. He has kept the faith.
  • IMDb
The Outlaw's Sacrifice
www.imdb.com
MovieJan 29, 1910

The Outlaw's Sacrifice

Matt Malone, a highwayman …
Matt Malone, a highwayman and night rider who has long baffled the police authorities, loves Nona McMahon, posing with her as a cowboy from up country. The McMahons are in trouble and old McMahon has been forced to mortgage the homestead. The money lender has been lenient up to this time, but, struck by the beauty of Nona McMahon, he endeavors to win her love. But she declines his offer. The lender, named McDermott, threatens foreclosure. In the meantime, Malone has been idle. It is his desire to make one grand coup and quit the game for good. He hears that the mountain stage coach is soon to carry a large amount of gold, and he decides to make a try for the loot. The hold-up occurs, but it's not as profitable as he expected. Also, he fears his identity has been discovered. He returns to his dugout, resolved to see his sweetheart and then quit the country. On his way to the girl's home he sees a notice posted by the sheriff, offering a reward of $5,000 for Malone's capture. He shoots down the sign and rides off to McMahon's. The girl greets him pleasantly. Their conversation drifts to McMahon's financial troubles, and the girl shows Malone a note from McDermott, stating that $5,000 must be paid the day after or they must vacate. Malone decides to tell the girl everything, and insists that she turn him over to the sheriff and gain the reward. He thrusts a revolver in her hands just as the sheriff enters. The manacles are slipped on and Malone and the sheriff go into the jail as the girl drops sobbing on the doorstep.
  • IMDb
1909
The Ranchman's Rival
MovieDec 11, 1909

The Ranchman's Rival

Jim Watson, cow puncher, big, brusque man of the plains, …
Jim Watson, cow puncher, big, brusque man of the plains, falls in love with Annie Morgan, the daughter of a fairly prosperous Western ranchman. After a short courtship Annie is won and plans for the marriage are made. Annie and Jim quarrel and at this most opportune time, Walter Milton, a wealthy young Easterner, honks into town in his big four-cylinder touring car, becomes enamored of the pretty Annie and lays plans for the frustration of the happy romance. Milton contrives to obtain an introduction and invites Annie for an auto ride. He laughs at her efforts to resist the temptation and she finally yields. It is the old story of the lure of the gold that glitters. Annie is persuaded by Milton to return Jim's ring and to wed him. Jim is sent away broken-hearted, but resigned in the belief that Milton can make her happier. Milton's intentions are the lowest and most despicable. He arranges with a Mexican "greaser" to pose as a "preacher" and perform the fake ceremony. A clergyman's suit and hat is furnished the Mexican to lend dignity to his lank form, and Milton then drives back to fetch Annie. In the meantime Jim has decided to leave the ranch and, bidding good-bye to his old-time pals, bundles up his few belongings, throws his saddle over his shoulder and starts on the long hike to the railway station. A smartly dressed young woman, a rarity in Jonesville, is pacing up and down the railway station when Jim arrives. As he passes her she looks up and, a little embarrassed, questions him, "I beg pardon, sir, but do you know Walter Milton, my husband?" The big Westerner looks at her kindly, "Walter Milton," then as the truth dawns on him, "your husband!" Explanations follow. Milton left El Paso in the auto for an extensive tour and was to meet her at Jonesville two weeks later. She has arrived somewhat ahead of the time set. Jim tells her to wait, then borrowing a horse, rides at breakneck speed back to the ranch. He traces the auto to the Mexican's shanty, arriving just in time to prevent the wedding. Without any explanation Watson forces Milton and Annie into the auto and orders the chauffeur to drive back to Jonesville. When they arrive at the station Milton is forced to confess to Annie and the rightful Mrs. Milton his nefarious scheme. Jim leaves the trio and saunters over to the post office and general store. A short time later, repentant and ashamed, Annie comes to him and begs forgiveness. Jim's big heart melts and he takes her in his arms and restores the ring to her finger.
  • IMDb
1884
John B. O'Brien
BirthDecember 1884

John B. O'Brien

John B. O'Brien was born.
Back to top
  • Data from
  • Wikipedia
  • IMDb
  • Wikidata
  • Freebase
  • Select images from
  • TiVo
Wikipedia text under CC-BY-SA license