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Cave Hill Cemetery

Cave Hill Cemetery

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Tripadvisor (2) · Arboretum
Cave Hill Cemetery is a 296-acre Victorian era National Cemetery and arboretum located at Louisville, Kentucky. Its main entrance is on Baxter Avenue and … See more

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Oct 11, 2018
Went with my wife for Bourbon and Beyond. The festival was great, great artists, lots of tastings and shops.The park was a train wreck, they are not equipped for a large amount of rain, no drainage … Full review by GWVan
Sep 24, 2018
The park hosted the Bourbon and Beyond 2018 event. It rained for days and the second day of event was cancelled. Park & Event Staff couldn't help the rain but wow this place was a mess after the do… Full review by jwcorbett

Articles

The Largest Cemetery In Louisville
Cave Hill Cemetery is a 296-acre Victorian era National Cemetery and arboretum located at 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky, United States. Its main entrance is on Baxter Avenue and there is a secondary one on Grinstead Drive. It is the largest cemetery by area and number of burials in Louisville. Cave Hill was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Cave Hill was chartered in 1848 on what was William Johnston's Cave Hill Farm, then a rural property some distance east of Louisville. Johnston, who died in 1798, had built the first brick house in Louisville on the grounds circa 1788. City officials had purchased part of the land in the 1830s in anticipation of building a railroad through it, and a workhouse was built there. The railroad was built elsewhere, and the land was leased to local farmers. In 1846, Mayor Frederick A. Kaye began investigating the possibility of developing a garden-style cemetery on the grounds, a popular concept at the time. Hartford, Connecticut civil engineer Edmund Francis Lee was hired, who planned a cemetery with winding paths, graves across the tops of hills, and lakes and ponds in the valleys. The Cave Hill Cemetery Co. was chartered in February 1848, and the cemetery was dedicated on July 25, 1848. Reverend Doctor Edward Porter Humphrey delivered the dedicatory address and elaborated on the idea of the garden cemetery, noting, among other things, that "...Reason and taste suggest that should be decorated appropriately by the beautiful productions of our great Creator..." Notable residents include Colonel Sanders and Muhammad Ali.
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Garden-Style Cemetery
Cave Hill Cemetery is a 296-acre Victorian era National Cemetery and arboretum located at 701 Baxter Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky. It is open daily to the public from 8:00 AM to 4:45 PM. Its main entrance is on Baxter Avenue and there is a secondary one on Grinstead Drive. Both former Louisville mayors for whom these streets are named, are buried in Cave Hill Cemetery. It is the largest cemetery by area and number of burials in Louisville. Cave Hill was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. Cave Hill National Cemetery, containing military graves, is also on the National Register, added in 1998. Cave Hill was chartered in 1848 on what was William Johnston's Cave Hill Farm, then a rural property some distance east of Louisville. Johnston, who died in 1798, had built the first brick house in Louisville on the grounds circa 1788. City officials had purchased part of the land in the 1830s in anticipation of building a railroad through it, and a workhouse was built there. The railroad was built elsewhere, and the land was leased to local farmers. In 1846, Mayor Frederick A. Kaye began investigating the possibility of developing a garden-style cemetery on the grounds, a popular concept at the time. Hartford, Connecticut civil engineer Edmund Francis Lee was hired, who planned a cemetery with winding paths, graves across the tops of hills, and lakes and ponds in the valleys. The Cave Hill Cemetery Co. was chartered in February 1848, and the cemetery was dedicated on July 25, 1848. Reverend E. P. Humphrey delivered the dedicatory address, and elaborated on the idea of the garden cemetery, noting, among other things, that ". . .Reason and taste suggest that should be decorated appropriately by the beautiful productions of our great Creator. . ."
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