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La Jolla Cove

La Jolla Cove

sandiego.gov
La Jolla Cove is a small cove with a beach that is surrounded by cliffs in La Jolla, San Diego, California. Point La Jolla forms the south side of the … See more

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Jan 23, 2023
I knew before even getting on the plane that I wanted to make a stop at La Jolla Cove to see the sea critters in their natural habitat. I was absolutely not disappointed and spent a good bit of time … Full review by Amber G
Jan 22, 2023
A very nice clean area, with lots to see. Sea lions, pelicans, sea birds. Path along the cliffs offer great views of the ocean, waves and animals. Many small vendors in the park selling touristy s… Full review by dolomitesandbeyond
Jan 16, 2023
The cove was so much more beautiful than I expected! The walk around the cove and the sights were amazing! We saw sea lions and pelicans and the kids walked down to the beach. Even the bathrooms i… Full review by kerian1

Articles

The Jewel of San Diego
Known as "The Jewel" of San Diego, La Jolla features luxury homes, fine dining and upscale shopping that rivals Rodeo Drive. But the real jewels in La Jolla are the beaches, which are freely available for visitors and locals alike. The La Jolla coastline varies dramatically - from 300 foot sea cliffs, to rocky reefs, to golden sand coves, exploring La Jolla’s beaches is an exhilarating and inspiring experience.Where to Go: La Jolla Shores is a mile long crescent of prime sand beach favored by active beachgoers of all interests. Anchored by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography pier, this is a busy swimming area popular among families and surfers alike. Shielded by La Jolla Bay, it is also used as a launching ground for scuba diving and kayaking. At night it's alive with the glow of beach fires and the nervous energy of young adults socializing. Fortified by 300 foot sea cliffs is Torrey Pines City Beach, home to Black's Beach, is located at the northern most point of La Jolla. Difficult and hazardous to access for the public, this spot is favored by local surfers and body boarders. And although nudity is prohibited by law in California,Black's Beach is frequented by those who prefer to enjoy the surf and sand in the buff. La Jolla Cove is the north facing point on the seaward end of the cliffs that form a small deep water bay here. The cliffs are riddled with sea caves of special fascination to kayakers who paddle over from La Jolla Shores Beach. La Jolla Cove itself has a fine little beach, on busy summer days, visitor and locals will flock to the area for terrific swimming and snorkeling afforded by The Cove's sheltered waters and abundance of bright orange Garibaldi fish and other tame marine life. Scuba divers and ocean swimmers use The Cove as a safe point of entry and exit. No surfboards, boogie boards or rafts of any kind are allowed. There is an excellent grass park adjacent to The Cove with bathrooms, showers, picnic tables, a paved pedestrian walkway and several public gazebos. The Children’s Pool, located close to downtown La Jolla, is a small cove protected by a concrete breakwater wall originally built to create a safe swimming area for children. Now, however, the area is a protected area frequented by seals and sea lions who beach themselves on the sand with their young.
maps.roadtrippers.com
Explore La Jolla Cove
La Jolla Cove is one of the most photographed beaches in San Diego, located on the coast just south of Torrey Pines Natural Reserve. La Jolla Cove is also one of the best spots in San Diego for snorkeling and scuba diving. This calm cove is ecologically protected with many animals making their home here, including some bright orange garibaldi. There is parking nearby at paid lots, meters, or even free street parking if you’re lucky. Although it is a small beach, there is still a lot to explore here. Because the water is protected, no surfboards, bodyboards, or floating devices are allowed.Start your day at the Cave Store to check out Sunny Jim’s Cave, the only land accessible cave in La Jolla. All the other caves in La Jolla are only accessible by kayak. Pay the $5 fee for adults or $3 for children 16 and under and take a short walk down the stairs to check out this unique cave. The cave was named by The Wizard of Oz author Frank Baum who noticed that the shape of the cave’s opening resembled a cartoon mascot from the 1920s for British Force Wheat Cereal.After you’re done exploring the cave, walk out to the cliffs just outside the Cave Store to get a bird’s eye view above the cove. Scripps Pier can be seen in the distance to the northeast and the rest of La Jolla Cove awaits to the west. Look around and you’ll find yourself surrounded by seals along the cliffs at Seal Rock. The tide pools down at the beach are also not to be missed.
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