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Museum of Glass

Museum of Glass

museumofglass.org
Tripadvisor (1,282) · Art Museum
The Museum of Glass is a 75,000-square-foot art museum in Tacoma, Washington, dedicated to the medium of glass. Since its founding in … See more

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Jan 19, 2023
Beautiful small museum with stunning glass objects of many different styles, plus an active glass blowing studio with theater seats and live commentary. Highly recommend. Full review by 851elked
Jan 3, 2023
The Hot Shop was set up very well to demonstrate glass working, the video screens showing close-ups of the work being done and PA for explanation were very good (also played many of my favorite songs… Full review by 4dave2shop
Sep 17, 2022
STRONGLY recommend Free 3rd Thursday evenings. Also strongly recommend the live glassblowing demonstration -- we watched for nearly 2 hours and it was like a live movie full of drama (would they fini… Full review by 992carolynw

Articles

Dedicated to the Medium of Glass
The Museum of Glass is a 75,000-square-foot art museum in Tacoma, Washington dedicated to the medium of glass. Since its inception, the Museum of Glass has been committed to creating a space for the celebration of the studio glass movement through nurturing artists, implementing education, and encouraging creativity. History The idea for the Museum of Glass began in 1992 when Dr. Philip M. Phibbs, recently retired president of the University of Puget Sound, had a conversation with Tacoma native and renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly. Dr. Phibbs reasoned that the Pacific Northwest’s contributions to the studio glass movement warranted a glass museum, and just a few weeks later he outlined his idea and rationale for the Museum of Glass to the Executive Council for a Greater Tacoma. The timing of his proposal corresponded with the idea to redevelop the Thea Foss Waterway, and the Chairman of the Council, George Russel, concluded that the Museum of Glass would be the perfect anchor for the renewed waterway. The site for the museum, directly adjacent to the Thea Foss Waterway, was secured in 1995, and two years later acclaimed Canadian architect Arthur Erickson revealed his design for the museum. Construction of the museum began in June 2000, and the steel frame of the iconic hot-shop cone was completed in 2001. Shortly thereafter construction began on the Chihuly Bridge Of Glass to link the museum to downtown Tacoma. The museum opened on July 6, 2002 to thousands of visitors and worldwide accolades. Exhibitions The Museum of Glass galleries are used for temporary exhibitions of 20th- and 21st-century glass. Current Exhibitions Links: Australian Glass and the Pacific Northwest | May 17, 2013 - January 26, 2014 Benjamin Moore: Translucent | February 16, 2013 - October 2013 Northwest Artists Collect | January 19, 2013 - October 2013 Past Exhibitions Maestro: Recent Works by Lino Tagliapietra | July 14, 2012 - January 6, 2013 Origins: Early Works by Dale Chihuly | May 19, 2012 - October 21, 2012 Kids Design Glass | October 31, 2009 - October 30, 2011 Preston Singletary: Echoes, Fire, and Shadows | July 11, 2009 - September 19, 2010 Visiting Artist Program The Museum of Glass hosts internationally-acclaimed and emerging artists through its Visiting Artist Residency Program. The residencies range in length from one day to several weeks, and a piece is selected from each residency for inclusion in the Museum’s collection. Most residencies are streamed online through the museum’s website and conclude in a Conversation with the Artist lecture. Since its opening, the Museum of Glass has partnered with Pilchuck Glass School to produce the Visiting Artist Summer Series in which artists who attend or work at Piilchuck are invited to a residency at the Museum of Glass. The first ever visiting artist to the Museum of Glass was Dale Chihuly at the museum’s opening in 2002.
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